Santa Fe Fe-24 and Fe-28 photos


Todd Sullivan
 

I have been looking on the web for several days trying to find clear photos of Santa Fe's class Fe-24 and Fe-28 50' double door boxcars.  I have a kit for each (P2K for Fe-24, Branchline for Fe-28), and I need to know what kind of trucks each one had, and check out other details before I proceed with the builds.

Can anyone help?

Many thanks,

Todd Sullivan


Tony Thompson
 

Todd Sullivan wrote:

I have been looking on the web for several days trying to find clear photos of Santa Fe's class Fe-24 and Fe-28 50' double door boxcars.  I have a kit for each (P2K for Fe-24, Branchline for Fe-28), and I need to know what kind of trucks each one had, and check out other details before I proceed with the builds.

    The FE-24 cars got ASF A-3 trucks later (many were delivered with Allied Full Cushion). The -28s were delivered with A-3. This from the Hendrickson book on ATSF auto cars.

Tony Thompson




Benjamin Hom
 

Todd Sullivan asked:
"I have been looking on the web for several days trying to find clear photos of Santa Fe's class Fe-24 and Fe-28 50' double door boxcars.  I have a kit for each (P2K for Fe-24, Branchline for Fe-28), and I need to know what kind of trucks each one had, and check out other details before I proceed with the builds. Can anyone help?"

Richard Hendrickson's article in the October 1995 issue of Railmodel Journal has a Frank Ellington collection photo of an Fe-24 converted to express service still in freight lettering (pages 22-23).


Ben Hom


mopacfirst
 

Here's what some of them looked like near the end: 

Many of them got sidesill reinforcement that looked basically as if they'd been built that way.  And I think these are still A-3 trucks.

Ron Merrick


Todd Sullivan
 

Thank you, Tony, Ben & Ron.  The photos are very helpful.

Todd Sullivan


Jim Gates
 

Specifically, the 200 Fe-24 delivered for passenger service came with the Allied Full Cushion. The other 300 came with Barber S2 trucks. When 100 of these were modified for passenger service some got A-3 trucks. And most of the original passenger service cars either traded with the remaining freight ones or received A-3 trucks. All the Allied full Cushions disappeared in the late 40s. There are pictures of Fe-24 cars with other experimental trucks in the late 40s, these were short lived one shots.

Jim Gates

On Friday, April 24, 2020, 05:59:04 PM CDT, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


Todd Sullivan wrote:

I have been looking on the web for several days trying to find clear photos of Santa Fe's class Fe-24 and Fe-28 50' double door boxcars.  I have a kit for each (P2K for Fe-24, Branchline for Fe-28), and I need to know what kind of trucks each one had, and check out other details before I proceed with the builds.

    The FE-24 cars got ASF A-3 trucks later (many were delivered with Allied Full Cushion). The -28s were delivered with A-3. This from the Hendrickson book on ATSF auto cars.

Tony Thompson




Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

     With Todd having raised questions about the Santa Fe's 50 ft. Auto/Furniture cars I'd like to raise some
further questions. When I was in high school I used to keep a record of the reporting marks and car numbers
of none home road cars I saw at various points within New England and now wish they had been saved. The 
specific reason for this today is that I do not remember seeing that many 50 ft.cars of any type in Northern
New England. Logically it would seem that automobiles being delivered to dealerships in smaller towns in the
region could have come in either 40 or 50 Auto cars. That said it would also seem that the 50 ft. auto cars 
used wo;d have been from roads like the GTW, NYC, Erie and possibly a few LV cars. Did the PM, DT&I,
AA or Wabash even roster such cars? The PM had some 50 ft. cars but they were largeky restricted for 
the PM"s Canadian lines having been constructed in Canada.The DT&I had over 200 50 ft. auto cars some 
of which were set up to handle auto parts and could have gone to the Ford Assembly plant in Somerville or 
the GMC plant in Framingham, MA  but I don't know that for certain. I have fnd n record for the AA having any 
50 ft. box cars while the Wabash had some 150 auto cars or 50 ft. in length 25 of which were even equipped 
with end doors but Wabash cars in my experience were a rare  car in Northern New England. Can anyone 
speak definitively about this? If cars from other roads of this specific design were to be found in the region 
what is a likely cargo for them? I realize there were some 50 ft. cars of lumber received from the Pacific 
Northwest but the only 50 ft. cars I remember in this service were No. Pac. cars purchased 2nd hand of the 
Pennsy's round roof variety, the last such car I saw having been in Arlington, Mass. in 1972, 25 years after the 
period I model. It would seem that Sou. Pac. or UP cars of this type might be a possibility with lumber out of 
Oregon but I can't think what a Santa Fe car, for example, might have carried. Who might have some thoughts 
for loads in cars of this type from Western roads?

My est, Don Valentine




Tim O'Connor
 


You sure about that Jim ? None of these cars have steam or signal lines.


On 4/25/2020 2:04 AM, Jim Gates via groups.io wrote:
Specifically, the 200 Fe-24 delivered for passenger service came with the Allied Full Cushion. The other 300 came with Barber S2 trucks. When 100 of these were modified for passenger service some got A-3 trucks. And most of the original passenger service cars either traded with the remaining freight ones or received A-3 trucks. All the Allied full Cushions disappeared in the late 40s. There are pictures of Fe-24 cars with other experimental trucks in the late 40s, these were short lived one shots.

Jim Gates
On Friday, April 24, 2020, 05:59:04 PM CDT, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


Todd Sullivan wrote:

I have been looking on the web for several days trying to find clear photos of Santa Fe's class Fe-24 and Fe-28 50' double door boxcars.  I have a kit for each (P2K for Fe-24, Branchline for Fe-28), and I need to know what kind of trucks each one had, and check out other details before I proceed with the builds.

    The FE-24 cars got ASF A-3 trucks later (many were delivered with Allied Full Cushion). The -28s were delivered with A-3. This from the Hendrickson book on ATSF auto cars.

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


Don,

There's nothing wrong with the questions, but it occurs to me that you
could answer these questions for yourself with Equipment Registers.



On 4/25/2020 8:56 AM, Donald B. Valentine via groups.io wrote:
     With Todd having raised questions about the Santa Fe's 50 ft. Auto/Furniture cars I'd like to raise some
further questions. When I was in high school I used to keep a record of the reporting marks and car numbers
of none home road cars I saw at various points within New England and now wish they had been saved. The 
specific reason for this today is that I do not remember seeing that many 50 ft.cars of any type in Northern
New England. Logically it would seem that automobiles being delivered to dealerships in smaller towns in the
region could have come in either 40 or 50 Auto cars. That said it would also seem that the 50 ft. auto cars 
used wo;d have been from roads like the GTW, NYC, Erie and possibly a few LV cars. Did the PM, DT&I,
AA or Wabash even roster such cars? The PM had some 50 ft. cars but they were largeky restricted for 
the PM"s Canadian lines having been constructed in Canada.The DT&I had over 200 50 ft. auto cars some 
of which were set up to handle auto parts and could have gone to the Ford Assembly plant in Somerville or 
the GMC plant in Framingham, MA  but I don't know that for certain. I have fnd n record for the AA having any 
50 ft. box cars while the Wabash had some 150 auto cars or 50 ft. in length 25 of which were even equipped 
with end doors but Wabash cars in my experience were a rare  car in Northern New England. Can anyone 
speak definitively about this? If cars from other roads of this specific design were to be found in the region 
what is a likely cargo for them? I realize there were some 50 ft. cars of lumber received from the Pacific 
Northwest but the only 50 ft. cars I remember in this service were No. Pac. cars purchased 2nd hand of the 
Pennsy's round roof variety, the last such car I saw having been in Arlington, Mass. in 1972, 25 years after the 
period I model. It would seem that Sou. Pac. or UP cars of this type might be a possibility with lumber out of 
Oregon but I can't think what a Santa Fe car, for example, might have carried. Who might have some thoughts 
for loads in cars of this type from Western roads?

My est, Don Valentine


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Don,

D&H had 10 50-foot double-door boxcars in series 25000-25009. These were ex-PRR cars. I don't know when the D&H bought them, but they are in my October 1958 ORER. They had special racks for automobile radiators, in other words, in auto parts service. One is preserved on the Cooperstown & Charlotte Valley. My photo was taken in the early 1990s when the museum equipment was stored in Oneonta.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff 🦆

On Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 8:56 AM Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
     With Todd having raised questions about the Santa Fe's 50 ft. Auto/Furniture cars I'd like to raise some
further questions. When I was in high school I used to keep a record of the reporting marks and car numbers
of none home road cars I saw at various points within New England and now wish they had been saved. The 
specific reason for this today is that I do not remember seeing that many 50 ft.cars of any type in Northern
New England. Logically it would seem that automobiles being delivered to dealerships in smaller towns in the
region could have come in either 40 or 50 Auto cars. That said it would also seem that the 50 ft. auto cars 
used wo;d have been from roads like the GTW, NYC, Erie and possibly a few LV cars. Did the PM, DT&I,
AA or Wabash even roster such cars? The PM had some 50 ft. cars but they were largeky restricted for 
the PM"s Canadian lines having been constructed in Canada.The DT&I had over 200 50 ft. auto cars some 
of which were set up to handle auto parts and could have gone to the Ford Assembly plant in Somerville or 
the GMC plant in Framingham, MA  but I don't know that for certain. I have fnd n record for the AA having any 
50 ft. box cars while the Wabash had some 150 auto cars or 50 ft. in length 25 of which were even equipped 
with end doors but Wabash cars in my experience were a rare  car in Northern New England. Can anyone 
speak definitively about this? If cars from other roads of this specific design were to be found in the region 
what is a likely cargo for them? I realize there were some 50 ft. cars of lumber received from the Pacific 
Northwest but the only 50 ft. cars I remember in this service were No. Pac. cars purchased 2nd hand of the 
Pennsy's round roof variety, the last such car I saw having been in Arlington, Mass. in 1972, 25 years after the 
period I model. It would seem that Sou. Pac. or UP cars of this type might be a possibility with lumber out of 
Oregon but I can't think what a Santa Fe car, for example, might have carried. Who might have some thoughts 
for loads in cars of this type from Western roads?

My est, Don Valentine




Tim O'Connor
 


Here's one in 1962


On 4/25/2020 10:38 AM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford wrote:
Don,

D&H had 10 50-foot double-door boxcars in series 25000-25009. These were ex-PRR cars. I don't know when the D&H bought them, but they are in my October 1958 ORER. They had special racks for automobile radiators, in other words, in auto parts service. One is preserved on the Cooperstown & Charlotte Valley. My photo was taken in the early 1990s when the museum equipment was stored in Oneonta.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff 🦆

On Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 8:56 AM Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
     With Todd having raised questions about the Santa Fe's 50 ft. Auto/Furniture cars I'd like to raise some
further questions. When I was in high school I used to keep a record of the reporting marks and car numbers
of none home road cars I saw at various points within New England and now wish they had been saved. The 
specific reason for this today is that I do not remember seeing that many 50 ft.cars of any type in Northern
New England. Logically it would seem that automobiles being delivered to dealerships in smaller towns in the
region could have come in either 40 or 50 Auto cars. That said it would also seem that the 50 ft. auto cars 
used wo;d have been from roads like the GTW, NYC, Erie and possibly a few LV cars. Did the PM, DT&I,
AA or Wabash even roster such cars? The PM had some 50 ft. cars but they were largeky restricted for 
the PM"s Canadian lines having been constructed in Canada.The DT&I had over 200 50 ft. auto cars some 
of which were set up to handle auto parts and could have gone to the Ford Assembly plant in Somerville or 
the GMC plant in Framingham, MA  but I don't know that for certain. I have fnd n record for the AA having any 
50 ft. box cars while the Wabash had some 150 auto cars or 50 ft. in length 25 of which were even equipped 
with end doors but Wabash cars in my experience were a rare  car in Northern New England. Can anyone 
speak definitively about this? If cars from other roads of this specific design were to be found in the region 
what is a likely cargo for them? I realize there were some 50 ft. cars of lumber received from the Pacific 
Northwest but the only 50 ft. cars I remember in this service were No. Pac. cars purchased 2nd hand of the 
Pennsy's round roof variety, the last such car I saw having been in Arlington, Mass. in 1972, 25 years after the 
period I model. It would seem that Sou. Pac. or UP cars of this type might be a possibility with lumber out of 
Oregon but I can't think what a Santa Fe car, for example, might have carried. Who might have some thoughts 
for loads in cars of this type from Western roads?

My est, Don Valentine



Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


John Barry
 

Oh, but they do!  

The Fe-24s numbered 4100-4399 carried the BX mechanical designation with a note that they were equipped for high speed passenger service with steel wheels, steam and signal lines.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


On Saturday, April 25, 2020, 10:24:51 AM EDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



You sure about that Jim ? None of these cars have steam or signal lines.


On 4/25/2020 2:04 AM, Jim Gates via groups.io wrote:

Specifically, the 200 Fe-24 delivered for passenger service came with the Allied Full Cushion. The other 300 came with Barber S2 trucks. When 100 of these were modified for passenger service some got A-3 trucks. And most of the original passenger service cars either traded with the remaining freight ones or received A-3 trucks. All the Allied full Cushions disappeared in the late 40s. There are pictures of Fe-24 cars with other experimental trucks in the late 40s, these were short lived one shots.

Jim Gates
On Friday, April 24, 2020, 05:59:04 PM CDT, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


Todd Sullivan wrote:

I have been looking on the web for several days trying to find clear photos of Santa Fe's class Fe-24 and Fe-28 50' double door boxcars.  I have a kit for each (P2K for Fe-24, Branchline for Fe-28), and I need to know what kind of trucks each one had, and check out other details before I proceed with the builds.

    The FE-24 cars got ASF A-3 trucks later (many were delivered with Allied Full Cushion). The -28s were delivered with A-3. This from the Hendrickson book on ATSF auto cars.

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Thomas Birkett
 

When I was doing time studies on repair of wrecks in Topeka Shops in the 1970s,  I was surprised to see odd holes punched ( not burned with a torch) in the body bolsters of FE-24s. A little investigation led me to former passenger service assignments. Seems like I was also able to find where the brackets had been removed that held up the end valves and piping. All of the Allied Full Coil trucks were gone by this time.
Tom Birkett, Bartlesville


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S® 6, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: John Barry <northbaylines@...>
Date: 4/25/20 10:07 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Santa Fe Fe-24 and Fe-28 photos

Oh, but they do!  

The Fe-24s numbered 4100-4399 carried the BX mechanical designation with a note that they were equipped for high speed passenger service with steel wheels, steam and signal lines.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


On Saturday, April 25, 2020, 10:24:51 AM EDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



You sure about that Jim ? None of these cars have steam or signal lines.


On 4/25/2020 2:04 AM, Jim Gates via groups.io wrote:

Specifically, the 200 Fe-24 delivered for passenger service came with the Allied Full Cushion. The other 300 came with Barber S2 trucks. When 100 of these were modified for passenger service some got A-3 trucks. And most of the original passenger service cars either traded with the remaining freight ones or received A-3 trucks. All the Allied full Cushions disappeared in the late 40s. There are pictures of Fe-24 cars with other experimental trucks in the late 40s, these were short lived one shots.

Jim Gates
On Friday, April 24, 2020, 05:59:04 PM CDT, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


Todd Sullivan wrote:

I have been looking on the web for several days trying to find clear photos of Santa Fe's class Fe-24 and Fe-28 50' double door boxcars.  I have a kit for each (P2K for Fe-24, Branchline for Fe-28), and I need to know what kind of trucks each one had, and check out other details before I proceed with the builds.

    The FE-24 cars got ASF A-3 trucks later (many were delivered with Allied Full Cushion). The -28s were delivered with A-3. This from the Hendrickson book on ATSF auto cars.

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Bob Chaparro
 

I seem to recall the Allied full-cushion trucks were banned from interchange about 1959 due to excessive derailments.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA 
 


Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Hi Tim,

    Unfortunately ORER's don't provide any info regarding use or usual  routes. They do, However,
tell me that your ATSF 10338 was one of 50 cars in the 10300-10350 group that list no special features 
such as being equipped for passenger service. What is shown is that they were simply 50 ft. cars with 
15 ft. staggered doors,

My best, Don Valentine


Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Thanks Garth,

    Unfortunately the D&H had no 50 ft. box cars in my era when the 17000 series 40 ft. steel cars they 
rostered were the longest boxcars they had. Lots of 36 ft. wood sheathed cars were still present, however.
Somehow I suspect you are not far from I-81 which is a road I see too much of between here and your area.
At least the Schenectady - Binghampton portion of it is quite scenic though not a much fun as when the D&H 
still owned the paralleling rails. Sometimes I still use NY Rt. #7 just to bring back old memories and will have
to swing up to Cooperstown one of thes e days and see what is lleft there.

My best, Don Valentine


mopacfirst
 

The photo of AT 10338 clearly shows a shop date of 11-46 (Topeka).  Conjecturing, this one could have been moved to freight service, repainted and had the steam and signal lines removed.  The other three photos show cars as new, the picture filename says 1941.  Conjecturing again, they could have had the steam and signal lines installed at Topeka after receipt.  Tom Birkett's observations match with this conjecture.

My Santa Fe freight car books have moved, but I have not, so I have no other data points to contribute.

Ron Merrick


Craig Wilson
 

GTW did roster 50-foot cars with end doors.  Some lasted long enough to be sold off to other railroads (I remember one that ended up on the Michigan Northern Ry post-1976 and I am certain that the end doors were welded shut by that time).

Wabash also had some although it is uncertain that any would have wandered into New England.

As to the Ann Arbor (and I know more about their freight car fleet than any sane person ought to) it rostered NO 50-foot boxcars.  There were 1920's-built single sheath cars including the one modeled by Speedwitch.  These were neat cars with taller-than-usual Hutchins ends and were built as door-and-a-half cars with many of them converted to single door cars.  Rob Adams wrote a comprehensive history of them for Ted Culotta's Prototype Railroad Modeling, Vol 2 and there is a picture of one of them in Maine on the BAR loaded with pulpwood.  Some had racks for battery loading as the Globe-Union Company had a battery plant in Owosso, Michigan.  Interesting operation that received zinc in Canadian Pacific boxcars and shipped batteries all over the place but, again, doubtful if any made it to New England.  It wasn't until the DT&I assumed control of the AA (straying over the time line but in the interest of a complete answer) that there were any 50-foot cars with AA reporting marks.  Small groups of DT&I cars were given "A.A." reporting marks and AA compass heralds to make it easier for assigned cars to be routed back to their shippers.  There were both ACF and P-S built cars but none with end doors.

Craig Wilson


Steve SANDIFER
 

According to Richard Hendrickson: “The first 200 FE-24s were delivered with steam and signal lines, marker lamp brackets, and special paint jobs for passenger express service.…The Santa Fe’s passenger-equipped FE-24s numbered 10000-10199 had Allied Full Cushion pedestal trucks and were painted coach green (dark olive) with black roofs and underbodies. Stenciling was Dulux gold and included the system maps and slogans that were then being applied to all of the Santa Fe’s box, automobile, and refrigerator cars….The other 300 FE-24s numbered 10200-10499 were assigned to general merchandise service and painted the usual freight scheme… When the volume of express shipments grew dramatically after…WWI, the Santa Fe installed passenger equipment on another hundred FE-24s in 1943 and assigned them to express service. Shortly afterward, all of the FE-24 express cars were given passenger car numbers in the 4100-4399 series, leaving on the FE-24s numbered 10300-10499 in the freight car pool. Also as they were repainted, the express cars lost their maps and slogans. About the same time, there was a great flurry of truck swapping among the FE-24s. It had been found that the Allied Full Cushion trucks, though smoother riding than conventional freight trucks, were prone to derailment. When the truck manufacturer was unable to cure this problem, the Santa Fe equipped the express service FE-24s with Barber S-2 Stabilized freight trucks removed from freight service FE-24s, supplemented with some new ASF A-3 Ride Control trucks. The Allied trucks removed from the express car fleet were then installed on FE-24s in the freight car fleet. When derailment problems with Allied trucks persisted even at freight train speeds, they were taken out of service entirely in the late 1940s and were banned by the AAR in interchange service by the mid-1950s…. Four different trucks were installed on four express service FE-24s in the late 1940s: 4108 had Keystone trucks, 4197 had Chrysler FR-5-D trucks, 4230 had LFM trucks, and 4281 had Scullin trucks. None of these trucks performed significantly better than the Barber and ASF freight trucks to justify their added expense and all of the FE-24s in both express and freight service eventually ended up rolling on Barber S-2 and ASF A-3 freight trucks with built in bolster snubbers. Then in the mid-1960s express FE-24s in the 4100-4178 series were equipped with roller bearing trucks.”

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2020 9:25 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Santa Fe Fe-24 and Fe-28 photos

 


You sure about that Jim ? None of these cars have steam or signal lines.


On 4/25/2020 2:04 AM, Jim Gates via groups.io wrote:

Specifically, the 200 Fe-24 delivered for passenger service came with the Allied Full Cushion. The other 300 came with Barber S2 trucks. When 100 of these were modified for passenger service some got A-3 trucks. And most of the original passenger service cars either traded with the remaining freight ones or received A-3 trucks. All the Allied full Cushions disappeared in the late 40s. There are pictures of Fe-24 cars with other experimental trucks in the late 40s, these were short lived one shots.

Jim Gates

On Friday, April 24, 2020, 05:59:04 PM CDT, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

 

 

Todd Sullivan wrote:



I have been looking on the web for several days trying to find clear photos of Santa Fe's class Fe-24 and Fe-28 50' double door boxcars.  I have a kit for each (P2K for Fe-24, Branchline for Fe-28), and I need to know what kind of trucks each one had, and check out other details before I proceed with the builds.

 

    The FE-24 cars got ASF A-3 trucks later (many were delivered with Allied Full Cushion). The -28s were delivered with A-3. This from the Hendrickson book on ATSF auto cars.

 

Tony Thompson

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Jim Gates
 

The originally passenger equipped cars were 10000 to 10199. The 100 that were converted were 10200 to 10299. These were renumber 4100 to 4399. Most of these kept there passenger equipment until the end of passenger service. 10338 was never passenger equipped. It is one of the cars that ended up with a swapped set of Allied Full Cushion trucks. 10326 did also, probably quite a few more.

The other photos Tim sent were either builder's photos are at delivery. I agree that the steam hoses do not appear to be installed. The same can be said for the builder's photos in Richard's book. It is possible these items were not installed until after delivery. In service photos do show the steam lines.

Jim Gates

On Saturday, April 25, 2020, 12:45:13 PM CDT, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:


The photo of AT 10338 clearly shows a shop date of 11-46 (Topeka).  Conjecturing, this one could have been moved to freight service, repainted and had the steam and signal lines removed.  The other three photos show cars as new, the picture filename says 1941.  Conjecturing again, they could have had the steam and signal lines installed at Topeka after receipt.  Tom Birkett's observations match with this conjecture.

My Santa Fe freight car books have moved, but I have not, so I have no other data points to contribute.

Ron Merrick