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Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

A circa 1907 photo from the University of Washington:

https://digitalcollections.lib.washington.edu/digital/collection/curtis/id/1489/rec/105

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit but I cannot discern the reporting marks.

Location: Chlopeck Fish Co. packing warehouse on Railroad Ave., Seattle.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Bob,
 
Perhaps it is a live fish car or a live oyster transport car. I have some vague memory these were discussed on this list in the past, maybe very distant past...
 
Somehow the term “Stillwell Live Oyster car” sticks in my head.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 
 
 

From: Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 07, 2020 2:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company
 

Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

A circa 1907 photo from the University of Washington:

https://digitalcollections.lib.washington.edu/digital/collection/curtis/id/1489/rec/105

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit but I cannot discern the reporting marks.

Location: Chlopeck Fish Co. packing warehouse on Railroad Ave., Seattle.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Andy Laurent
 

Bob,

I see "PACIFIC" and a 50000-series number on the right-center of the car's frame.  Union, Southern, Missouri...?  Interesting car, I wonder if it was classified as a gondola, hopper, or tank car.

Andy L.
Wisconsin


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
How about the link below? Look similar?
 
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

From: Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Thursday, May 07, 2020 3:15 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company
 
Hi Bob,
 
Perhaps it is a live fish car or a live oyster transport car. I have some vague memory these were discussed on this list in the past, maybe very distant past...
 
Somehow the term “Stillwell Live Oyster car” sticks in my head.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 
 
 
From: Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 07, 2020 2:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company
 

Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

A circa 1907 photo from the University of Washington:

https://digitalcollections.lib.washington.edu/digital/collection/curtis/id/1489/rec/105

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit but I cannot discern the reporting marks.

Location: Chlopeck Fish Co. packing warehouse on Railroad Ave., Seattle.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 12:37 PM, Andy Laurent wrote:
I see "PACIFIC" and a 50000-series number on the right-center of the car's frame.  Union, Southern, Missouri...?  Interesting car, I wonder if it was classified as a gondola, hopper, or tank car.
Looks like a drop bottom gondola of coal to me, although the unloading crew at the right end are not availing themselves of the drop door feature. Canneries use a lot of steam, and those two large stacks behind the car should provide a clue as to where it comes from. More interesting to me is the express car spotted to the far right; at least some of the product went out as fresh fish.

Dennis Storzek


Donald B. Valentine
 

Good for you Claus,

     I wondered about that too but had forgotten about the oyster car. But let's take a hard look at the car.

1. There appear to be no hoppers beneath the carbody proper as on a hopper car.

2. It is too tall to be easily shoveled out or to find traps to open on the floor.

3. There is a walkway showing on the sides that could be to stand on when dumping live oysters,
    or fish into tanks.

4. What we can see of the inside of the car really looks to light for a car used in coal service.

5. There are also two wheels along the top edge that could be used to open valves to drain the tanks.
    Some might say to crank open traps but with all that material on top of them I'd say you've got to be
    kidding! That does appear to be a boiler plant behind it however. Is the car #17116 or #17115?

   It will take some effort to convince me this is any type of hopper car or high side gondola.

Cordially, Don Valentine


John Riddell
 

According to the 1891 ORER, NP 50355 was one of 356 NP coal gondolas in series 50201-50999. Inside length 33.4, inside width 7-4, inside height 2-11, capacity 4,000.

 

John Riddell

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Steve SANDIFER
 

As I understand it, only one of Stillwell’s oyster cars was ever built.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 2:47 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

 

Hi List Members,

 

How about the link below? Look similar?

 

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

From: Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)

Sent: Thursday, May 07, 2020 3:15 PM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

 

Hi Bob,

 

Perhaps it is a live fish car or a live oyster transport car. I have some vague memory these were discussed on this list in the past, maybe very distant past...

 

Somehow the term “Stillwell Live Oyster car” sticks in my head.

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Bob Chaparro via groups.io

Sent: Thursday, May 07, 2020 2:53 PM

Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

 

Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

A circa 1907 photo from the University of Washington:

https://digitalcollections.lib.washington.edu/digital/collection/curtis/id/1489/rec/105

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit but I cannot discern the reporting marks.

Location: Chlopeck Fish Co. packing warehouse on Railroad Ave., Seattle

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Jack Mullen
 

On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 02:27 PM, John Riddell wrote:
According to the 1891 ORER, NP 50355 was one of 356 NP coal gondolas in series 50201-50999. Inside length 33.4, inside width 7-4, inside height 2-11, capacity 4,000.
I think that the car in question may indeed be a Northern Pacific coal car, but with a 2' 11" IH, this probably isn't the right series. Height of the sides in the photo appears to be in the 5' to 6' range.

Jack Mullen


Thomas Evans
 

An oyster car would have a roof, which this one doesn't.
There were coal hoppers built to a similar design, although the ones I've seen were much smaller.
These had the dump doors tucked way up under the car so they wouldn't show in the photo.
Here's a photo (ACF photo via Frank Ellington).

Tom


Schuyler Larrabee
 

But John, the car in the photo CLEARLY has an inside height well in excess of 2’-11”.  Based on the men in the photo, the IH must be more on the order of at least 6’-0”.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Riddell
Sent: Thursday, May 07, 2020 5:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

 

According to the 1891 ORER, NP 50355 was one of 356 NP coal gondolas in series 50201-50999. Inside length 33.4, inside width 7-4, inside height 2-11, capacity 4,000.

 

John Riddell

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 08:39 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
But John, the car in the photo CLEARLY has an inside height well in excess of 2’-11”.
Measured from where? The dimension is intended to be measured from a flat floor, but these new fangled hopper bottom gondolas don't have a flat floor, the outlets are at frame level and the floor, such as it is, slopes up from there. So where exactly is this dimension supposed to be taken from? If the guy submitting the data chose the top of the slope sheet as the "floor", the sides likely only extend 2'-11" higher. Really need a top of sides over rail dimension to make any sense of it.

Dennis Storzek


David Allen
 

Folks:

Consider NP 70049-70073, 35T cap, IL=33'1", IW=7'11", IH=5'9". Plans in American Engineer 70, 1896, pg34
Twenty five cars blt and still in 1906 ORER, only 15 left in 1911 ORER.

Dave Allen


San Antonio & San Francisco <sanantonio-sanfrancisco@...>
 

J, et al,

Actually, there were three Stillwell Oyster Cars that were built. Car A, Car B, and Car C. Cars B and C were involved in a train wreck enroute to the railroad from the builder and were completely destroyed and never replaced. Car A survived and was used for a short time, however, was discontinued because the loading and unloading process and the inability to keep the oysters fresh by changing out the water in the brine tanks brought about its demise. There are great pictures of Car A, however B and C may not exist. I've post up pictures of Car A for everyone. I am having the top vents and decals made for all three cars. Cars were painted dark blue, which is very rare for the era, as blue pigment paints were not readily available and the pigments didn't last under the effects of the sun. Letting is either white or silver.

Levi


Steve SANDIFER
 

Great info. Thanks.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of San Antonio & San Francisco
Sent: Saturday, May 9, 2020 8:25 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

 

J, et al,

Actually, there were three Stillwell Oyster Cars that were built. Car A, Car B, and Car C. Cars B and C were involved in a train wreck enroute to the railroad from the builder and were completely destroyed and never replaced. Car A survived and was used for a short time, however, was discontinued because the loading and unloading process and the inability to keep the oysters fresh by changing out the water in the brine tanks brought about its demise. There are great pictures of Car A, however B and C may not exist. I've post up pictures of Car A for everyone. I am having the top vents and decals made for all three cars. Cars were painted dark blue, which is very rare for the era, as blue pigment paints were not readily available and the pigments didn't last under the effects of the sun. Letting is either white or silver.

Levi


Jack Mullen
 

On Fri, May 8, 2020 at 08:12 AM, David Allen wrote:
Consider NP 70049-70073, 35T cap, IL=33'1", IW=7'11", IH=5'9". Plans in American Engineer 70, 1896, pg34
Yes, I think you nailed it.  Plans match the photo. Thanks!
Here's a link to the cited issue, from the Linda Hall Library.
http://lhldigital.lindahall.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/rrjournal/id/6045

Jack Mullen