Photo: Stenciling Freshly Painted NKP Box Car 27676


Bob Chaparro
 


Richard Brennan
 

At 03:59 PM 5/10/2020, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:
<snip>
http://cdm16066.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16066coll27/id/8731/rec/47
Is that a shop-built tool for taking the 'bulge' from freight damage out of the stamped steel ends?
I didn't even think that was possible!


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Bob and List Members,
 
Thanks Bob for the interesting images and the links.
 
There are some other views on this site as well, one is at the link below. Can anyone ID the road name on the gondola, I want to say N&W, but it is difficult to say really. The full resolution image can be seen at...
 
 
Some additional image info can be found at ...
 
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

From: Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2020 6:59 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Stenciling Freshly Painted NKP Box Car 27676
 


Benjamin Hom
 

Claus Schlund asked:
"Can anyone ID the road name on the gondola, I want to say N&W, but it is difficult to say really. The full resolution image can be seen at...
http://cdm16066.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=coal&CISOPTR=6&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=9512&DMHEIGHT=9512&DMX=0&DMY=0&DMTEXT=railroad&DMROTATE=0 

Some additional image info can be found at ...
http://cdm16066.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/coal/id/6/rec/83 


N&W Class GG gon.  Photo from the Virginia Tech Norfolk Southern collection:


Ben Hom



 







Lee
 

the straight arms have a chain and what looks like a hoist, so with that and the missing coupler I would say that's how they are changing out the coupler without having to lift by hand.

Lee Stoermer
Aldie, VA


On Sunday, May 10, 2020, 07:24:00 PM EDT, Richard Brennan <rbrennan@...> wrote:


At 03:59 PM 5/10/2020, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:
><snip>
>http://cdm16066.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16066coll27/id/8731/rec/47

Is that a shop-built tool for taking the 'bulge' from freight damage
out of the stamped steel ends?
I didn't even think that was possible!


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
-------------------- 





Charles Peck
 

The coupler is there, but the knuckle is laying on the ground below it.
This rig seems to be using the knuckle pin as a fixed pivot point.  With 
that hefty jack for power, I can see making metal move.  
Chuck Peck 


On Sun, May 10, 2020 at 11:32 PM Lee via groups.io <leetrains=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
the straight arms have a chain and what looks like a hoist, so with that and the missing coupler I would say that's how they are changing out the coupler without having to lift by hand.

Lee Stoermer
Aldie, VA


On Sunday, May 10, 2020, 07:24:00 PM EDT, Richard Brennan <rbrennan@...> wrote:


At 03:59 PM 5/10/2020, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:
><snip>
>http://cdm16066.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16066coll27/id/8731/rec/47

Is that a shop-built tool for taking the 'bulge' from freight damage
out of the stamped steel ends?
I didn't even think that was possible!


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
-------------------- 





Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Thanks Ben! Appreciated!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

From: Benjamin Hom
Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2020 9:04 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Stenciling Freshly Painted NKP Box Car 27676
 
Claus Schlund asked:
"Can anyone ID the road name on the gondola, I want to say N&W, but it is difficult to say really. The full resolution image can be seen at...
http://cdm16066.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=coal&CISOPTR=6&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=9512&DMHEIGHT=9512&DMX=0&DMY=0&DMTEXT=railroad&DMROTATE=0 

Some additional image info can be found at ...
http://cdm16066.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/coal/id/6/rec/83 
 
 
N&W Class GG gon.  Photo from the Virginia Tech Norfolk Southern collection:
 
 
Ben Hom
 
 
 




 
 
 
 


thmsdmpsy
 

I would say that is a coupler change.  After replacing the coupler, they'll reinstall the existing knuckle and regage the assembly.  If it still passes the gage, then they will replace the knuckle.  As always, Tom

On Sunday, May 10, 2020, 08:42:46 PM PDT, Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:


The coupler is there, but the knuckle is laying on the ground below it.
This rig seems to be using the knuckle pin as a fixed pivot point.  With 
that hefty jack for power, I can see making metal move.  
Chuck Peck 


On Sun, May 10, 2020 at 11:32 PM Lee via groups.io <leetrains=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
the straight arms have a chain and what looks like a hoist, so with that and the missing coupler I would say that's how they are changing out the coupler without having to lift by hand.

Lee Stoermer
Aldie, VA


On Sunday, May 10, 2020, 07:24:00 PM EDT, Richard Brennan <rbrennan@...> wrote:


At 03:59 PM 5/10/2020, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:
><snip>
>http://cdm16066.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16066coll27/id/8731/rec/47

Is that a shop-built tool for taking the 'bulge' from freight damage
out of the stamped steel ends?
I didn't even think that was possible!


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
-------------------- 





Dennis Storzek
 

http://cdm16066.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16066coll27/id/8731/rec/47

Why does everybody keep making this about the coupler? It's an END STRAIGHTENER. The rod back to the knuckle pin is the anchor. When the guy with the welder's goggles at the left in the picture raises the jack, the handle of which he is resting his hand on, the rig pulls against the coupler, while the two legs above push on the end. The guys with the sledges are there to help it along, really there to make a racket so the foreman knows they are working and stays in his office. The light block and tackle hung on the running board bracket is only there to help position the push legs, using the chain draped over the legs.

Dennis Storzek


Roger Huber <trainpainter@...>
 

Such an interesting picture demonstrating hard work and ingenuity at it's finest. I love those ladder/platforms!

Roger Huber
Deer Creek Locomotive Works


On Thursday, May 14, 2020, 01:18:41 PM CDT, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:


http://cdm16066.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16066coll27/id/8731/rec/47

Why does everybody keep making this about the coupler? It's an END STRAIGHTENER. The rod back to the knuckle pin is the anchor. When the guy with the welder's goggles at the left in the picture raises the jack, the handle of which he is resting his hand on, the rig pulls against the coupler, while the two legs above push on the end. The guys with the sledges are there to help it along, really there to make a racket so the foreman knows they are working and stays in his office. The light block and tackle hung on the running board bracket is only there to help position the push legs, using the chain draped over the legs.

Dennis Storzek


Mark Vinski
 

I wonder if it would be possible to photo etch an HO stencil for the dimensional data so we could avoid the use of decals.

Mark Vinski


Charles Peck
 

Almost anything can be done if you throw enough money and time into it.
Getting paint to behave in those tight spaces would be the second challenge.
I suspect you would have to really hate decals to go the stencil method.
Doing your own pad printing might be cheaper and easier. 
Chuck Peck

On Thu, May 14, 2020 at 9:20 PM mvlandsw <mvlandsw@...> wrote:
I wonder if it would be possible to photo etch an HO stencil for the dimensional data so we could avoid the use of decals.

Mark Vinski


Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, May 14, 2020 at 06:20 PM, mvlandsw wrote:
I wonder if it would be possible to photo etch an HO stencil for the dimensional data so we could avoid the use of decals.

Mark Vinski
That's pretty much what dry transfer lettering is / was; the ink without the decal film. Problem si, they tend to be hard tp position. Does anyone still make dry transfers since CDS left the market?

Dennis Storzek


mark_landgraf
 

How about using a 3D printer process to deliver paint thru a small bore needle ?

I'm not aware of anybody doing this. 

Mark Landgraf


On Thu, May 14, 2020 at 9:52 PM, Charles Peck
<lnnrr152@...> wrote:
Almost anything can be done if you throw enough money and time into it.
Getting paint to behave in those tight spaces would be the second challenge.
I suspect you would have to really hate decals to go the stencil method.
Doing your own pad printing might be cheaper and easier. 
Chuck Peck

On Thu, May 14, 2020 at 9:20 PM mvlandsw <mvlandsw@...> wrote:
I wonder if it would be possible to photo etch an HO stencil for the dimensional data so we could avoid the use of decals.

Mark Vinski


mel perry
 

ozark miniatures bought the business
they are in the process of revampimg
the listings, if you need something
that cds carried, call them, also cds
canadian distributor, at last check, was
still in business
mel perry

On Thu, May 14, 2020, 7:09 PM Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:
On Thu, May 14, 2020 at 06:20 PM, mvlandsw wrote:
I wonder if it would be possible to photo etch an HO stencil for the dimensional data so we could avoid the use of decals.

Mark Vinski
That's pretty much what dry transfer lettering is / was; the ink without the decal film. Problem si, they tend to be hard tp position. Does anyone still make dry transfers since CDS left the market?

Dennis Storzek


Douglas Harding
 

Clover House still makes and sells dry transfers.  http://cloverhouse.com/Cart/

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Thursday, May 14, 2020 9:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Stenciling Freshly Painted NKP Box Car 27676

 

On Thu, May 14, 2020 at 06:20 PM, mvlandsw wrote:

I wonder if it would be possible to photo etch an HO stencil for the dimensional data so we could avoid the use of decals.

Mark Vinski

That's pretty much what dry transfer lettering is / was; the ink without the decal film. Problem si, they tend to be hard tp position. Does anyone still make dry transfers since CDS left the market?

Dennis Storzek