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Virginian Freight Cars


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

I'm taking a brief break from the C&O, and today offering three Virginian photos for your interest and approval. All photos were taken circa 1982-1985 or so by myself.

Pulpwood car 809 was spotted in the NS (ex-N&W) yard at Crewe. According to my trusty October 1958 ORER, this car was from series 800-834. Between the bulkheads it was 42 1/2 feet with an overall length of 46 feet and a capacity of 110,000 pounds. In 1958 the Virginian rostered just 77 LP flat cars. How many were left by 1985 is unknown, but 809 was probably one of the last, and actually this car may have been in the dead line.

Hopper 1112 came from series 1000-2499. It was 40 feet inside, with a volume of 2573 cubic feet and a capacity of 140,000 pounds. Note the repair plates along the bottom of the car side. I found this car on the rarely-used interchange track between the NS (ex-Southern) and CSX (ex-C&O) in Charlottesville also around 1985. This is certainly unusual, but maybe it held a special grade of coal of some sort (it is loaded). It does prove that you could have an occasional VGN hopper car off home rails.

Hopper 27116 came from series 27000-27499. It is a 33' IL car with a volume of 2041 cubic feet and a capacity of 110,000 pounds. I found this one at the NS (ex-N&W) coal yard in Norfolk in 1982 or 1983. A few Virginian cars still showed up there, as did some from the Nickel Plate Road, but these were actually NS home-road cars by then. Sadly, this shot isn't in very good focus. One of the lens elements in my Canon FTB had shifted, though I didn't know it. I shot quite a few fuzzy shots with the 50 mm lens (it worked fine with wide-angle and telephoto lenses).

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Matt Goodman
 

It’s interesting that the streaking/fading down from the lettering is rust colored - not white. I just weathered a batch of cars with a white fade last week. If I’d seen this photo when Garth initially went it, I may have tried the rust on a few letters. 

Maybe this is typical for hoppers, and I’m only now starting to pay attention? 

Anyway, I’ll file this in my reference folder. I model 50 years earlier, but I can’t imagine steel and coal reacted much differently then vs 1985. 

Thanks Garth. 

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On May 22, 2020, at 10:51 AM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:


Friends,

I'm taking a brief break from the C&O, and today offering three Virginian photos for your interest and approval. All photos were taken circa 1982-1985 or so by myself.

Pulpwood car 809 was spotted in the NS (ex-N&W) yard at Crewe. According to my trusty October 1958 ORER, this car was from series 800-834. Between the bulkheads it was 42 1/2 feet with an overall length of 46 feet and a capacity of 110,000 pounds. In 1958 the Virginian rostered just 77 LP flat cars. How many were left by 1985 is unknown, but 809 was probably one of the last, and actually this car may have been in the dead line.

Hopper 1112 came from series 1000-2499. It was 40 feet inside, with a volume of 2573 cubic feet and a capacity of 140,000 pounds. Note the repair plates along the bottom of the car side. I found this car on the rarely-used interchange track between the NS (ex-Southern) and CSX (ex-C&O) in Charlottesville also around 1985. This is certainly unusual, but maybe it held a special grade of coal of some sort (it is loaded). It does prove that you could have an occasional VGN hopper car off home rails.

Hopper 27116 came from series 27000-27499. It is a 33' IL car with a volume of 2041 cubic feet and a capacity of 110,000 pounds. I found this one at the NS (ex-N&W) coal yard in Norfolk in 1982 or 1983. A few Virginian cars still showed up there, as did some from the Nickel Plate Road, but these were actually NS home-road cars by then. Sadly, this shot isn't in very good focus. One of the lens elements in my Canon FTB had shifted, though I didn't know it. I shot quite a few fuzzy shots with the 50 mm lens (it worked fine with wide-angle and telephoto lenses).

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Jun 24, 2020 at 07:12 PM, Matt Goodman wrote:
I can’t imagine steel and coal reacted much differently then vs 1985. 
 
But paint did. The National Environmental Protection Act of 1970 was not kind to paint manufacturers, forcing them to stop using a lot of traditional materials, all to the detriment of paint performance.

I think what you are looking at is the original black paint is at the end of its useful life, the entire surface eroded to the point where rust is bleeding through. Note the brown cast, compared to the newer black paint on the patch panels. The pigment washing off the letters is white, but it is mixing with the rust residue to become a light brown. A general wash of brown over the whole car would likely duplicate the effect, but I'm not sure you want to. That general overall haze of rust does not seem to be common in steam era photos, unless it is dust from the environment, such as found on the iron ore roads.

Dennis Storzek