Topics

Photo: Loading Packard Automobile Crates


Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Garth,
 
Some, perhaps most, automobiles were shipped as “kits” circa 1905.
 
Nice shot of the truck.  Too bad we can’t see more of the boxcars.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 2:30 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Loading Packard Automobile Crates
 
Bob,
 
Unless those crates contain spare parts, or are part of a "kit", they are far too small for a whole car.
 
In the early days before Evans racks, autos were sometimes shipped in crates (via freight cars; mandatory content). I wonder if this continued into later times for overseas shipments. Recently I was watching a Smithsonian channel documentary on the Raj in India. One of the sahibs had a very nice Packard auto, pretty much a luxury car for the time. Would this have been crated for shipment? I suspect so.
 
I owe my life to a 1948 Packard semi-limo my father bought used around 1954. We were rear-ended while stopped by a drunk driver in a Cadillac the police estimated was going well over 60 miles an hour. Our car went airborne, and was thrown all the way across a 4-lane intersection. We all had minor injuries, but my father was able to nurse the car the ten or so miles to our home. The Caddie was winched up onto a flatbed and hauled off to the junkyard. My father immediately bought another used Packard. Those autos were built like the tanks Packard engines powered during the war.
 
But I digress.
 
Yours Aye,
 
 
Garth Groff  🦆
 
On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 1:59 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Loading Packard Automobile Crates

A 1905 photo from the Wayne State University Libraries:

https://digital.library.wayne.edu/item/wayne:CFAIEB01e765

Click on "Open Image in Viewer".

This image can be enlarged quite a bit but loads slowly.

Description: "1921-22 Packard truck, left side view, unloading Packard crates into boxcars."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Bob,

Unless those crates contain spare parts, or are part of a "kit", they are far too small for a whole car.

In the early days before Evans racks, autos were sometimes shipped in crates (via freight cars; mandatory content). I wonder if this continued into later times for overseas shipments. Recently I was watching a Smithsonian channel documentary on the Raj in India. One of the sahibs had a very nice Packard auto, pretty much a luxury car for the time. Would this have been crated for shipment? I suspect so.

I owe my life to a 1948 Packard semi-limo my father bought used around 1954. We were rear-ended while stopped by a drunk driver in a Cadillac the police estimated was going well over 60 miles an hour. Our car went airborne, and was thrown all the way across a 4-lane intersection. We all had minor injuries, but my father was able to nurse the car the ten or so miles to our home. The Caddie was winched up onto a flatbed and hauled off to the junkyard. My father immediately bought another used Packard. Those autos were built like the tanks Packard engines powered during the war.

But I digress.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 1:59 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Loading Packard Automobile Crates

A 1905 photo from the Wayne State University Libraries:

https://digital.library.wayne.edu/item/wayne:CFAIEB01e765

Click on "Open Image in Viewer".

This image can be enlarged quite a bit but loads slowly.

Description: "1921-22 Packard truck, left side view, unloading Packard crates into boxcars."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Loading Packard Automobile Crates

A 1905 photo from the Wayne State University Libraries:

https://digital.library.wayne.edu/item/wayne:CFAIEB01e765

Click on "Open Image in Viewer".

This image can be enlarged quite a bit but loads slowly.

Description: "1921-22 Packard truck, left side view, unloading Packard crates into boxcars."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA