Topics

C&O MW Tenders


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

Attached are four views of former C&O steam locomotive tenders downgraded to MW service, which makes them "sort-of freight" cars. 

From the photos Bill McClure shared a few weeks back, I gather that most C&O outfit trains included at least one tender. Possibly the size of the tender varied with the size of the train. They probably carried coal for heating and/or cooking stoves until this was switched to natural gas, and likely also carried water for showers. I'm not sure if the water was fit to drink; MW tank cars for this purpose on some roads were marked "potable water". I see no such markings here.

All four cars were located together in Gordonsville, Virginia, around 1985-1986. There was quite a bit of old MW equipment held here at that time for eventual scrapping.

Enjoy the photos. Comments are always welcome.

Next time, Burro cranes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆



Jim King
 

Garth … I saw several Vanderbilt tenders (4- and 6-axle) in MOW service while living in Virginia in the 80s.  Definitely “eye catching” in a consist of old boxcars and passenger cars.  There were a few floating around Gladstone and Clifton Forge back then.

 

Jim King

http://smokymountainmodelworks.com/

 


mel perry
 

garth:
were the fuel bunkers converted also?
thanks
mel perry


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020, 1:50 PM Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Friends,

Attached are four views of former C&O steam locomotive tenders downgraded to MW service, which makes them "sort-of freight" cars. 

From the photos Bill McClure shared a few weeks back, I gather that most C&O outfit trains included at least one tender. Possibly the size of the tender varied with the size of the train. They probably carried coal for heating and/or cooking stoves until this was switched to natural gas, and likely also carried water for showers. I'm not sure if the water was fit to drink; MW tank cars for this purpose on some roads were marked "potable water". I see no such markings here.

All four cars were located together in Gordonsville, Virginia, around 1985-1986. There was quite a bit of old MW equipment held here at that time for eventual scrapping.

Enjoy the photos. Comments are always welcome.

Next time, Burro cranes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Attachments:


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Mel,

I think the bunkers continued to be used for some years to supply coal for heating and possibly cooking needs to the MW trains, as stated in my original post. Maybe not. Some C&O maven might be able to add more to this.

This raises an interesting question. How were the bunkers refilled after steam was discontinued? A conveyor of some sort, or were at least some coal towers maintained and kept loaded for the MW trains? Hmmm. And how long did coal stoves last in cabooses. Or did the end of steam and a ready coal supply abruptly bring on conversion of camp cars and cabooses to gas or oil heating?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆



On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 5:35 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
garth:
were the fuel bunkers converted also?
thanks
mel perry


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020, 1:50 PM Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Friends,

Attached are four views of former C&O steam locomotive tenders downgraded to MW service, which makes them "sort-of freight" cars. 

From the photos Bill McClure shared a few weeks back, I gather that most C&O outfit trains included at least one tender. Possibly the size of the tender varied with the size of the train. They probably carried coal for heating and/or cooking stoves until this was switched to natural gas, and likely also carried water for showers. I'm not sure if the water was fit to drink; MW tank cars for this purpose on some roads were marked "potable water". I see no such markings here.

All four cars were located together in Gordonsville, Virginia, around 1985-1986. There was quite a bit of old MW equipment held here at that time for eventual scrapping.

Enjoy the photos. Comments are always welcome.

Next time, Burro cranes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Attachments:


Mont Switzer
 

Garth and all,

 

Many (most?) coaling towers also had provisions for storing and dispensing sand.  That function kept some coaling towers in use well beyond their time.

 

The two that I am most familiar with are the Monon at Lafayette, IN, Shops and the K&IT Youngtown Yard in Louisville, KY.  Both were dispensing sand into the late 1960's.  Both were built from reinforced concrete.

 

Mont Switzer 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford [mallardlodge1000@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2020 4:57 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] C&O MW Tenders

Mel,

I think the bunkers continued to be used for some years to supply coal for heating and possibly cooking needs to the MW trains, as stated in my original post. Maybe not. Some C&O maven might be able to add more to this.

This raises an interesting question. How were the bunkers refilled after steam was discontinued? A conveyor of some sort, or were at least some coal towers maintained and kept loaded for the MW trains? Hmmm. And how long did coal stoves last in cabooses. Or did the end of steam and a ready coal supply abruptly bring on conversion of camp cars and cabooses to gas or oil heating?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆



On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 5:35 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
garth:
were the fuel bunkers converted also?
thanks
mel perry


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020, 1:50 PM Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Friends,

Attached are four views of former C&O steam locomotive tenders downgraded to MW service, which makes them "sort-of freight" cars. 

From the photos Bill McClure shared a few weeks back, I gather that most C&O outfit trains included at least one tender. Possibly the size of the tender varied with the size of the train. They probably carried coal for heating and/or cooking stoves until this was switched to natural gas, and likely also carried water for showers. I'm not sure if the water was fit to drink; MW tank cars for this purpose on some roads were marked "potable water". I see no such markings here.

All four cars were located together in Gordonsville, Virginia, around 1985-1986. There was quite a bit of old MW equipment held here at that time for eventual scrapping.

Enjoy the photos. Comments are always welcome.

Next time, Burro cranes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Attachments:


Bill McClure
 

The coal bunkers on C&O MOW tenders were left as-built.

Bill McClure


Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 01:58 AM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford wrote:
This raises an interesting question. How were the bunkers refilled after steam was discontinued? A conveyor of some sort, or were at least some coal towers maintained and kept loaded for the MW trains?
That's what they make shovels for. The men on work trains were mostly rated as laborers anyway... want heat tonight... shovel enough coal into the bunker to last us the week.

Hmmm. And how long did coal stoves last in cabooses. Or did the end of steam and a ready coal supply abruptly bring on conversion of camp cars and cabooses to gas or oil heating?
Long after the steam era, and long after the time period of this list. I can still remember chasing a South Shore (an electric line) freight down the street in Michigan City with the smell of coal smoke waffing from the caboose stack. This was in the early seventies.

The Soo Line never changed the stoves in their wood cabooses, some of which were still in service in the 1970's. Coal was supplied from a coal box adjacent to the caboose tie-up track.

Dennis Storzek


 
 


mopacfirst
 

I was in some Santa Fe cabooses in 1969/70 sitting in storage in Wichita, awaiting rebuilding or scrapping, most likely scrapping since the West Wichita shops had just closed.  They all had cast iron stoves.  While I don't remember a coal box, there certainly wasn't any other form of heat.

Ron Merrick


mofwcaboose <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

No railroad was more dedicated then the C&O in using old tenders for coal & water in the camp trains. A roster published by the C&O Historical Society shows numbers in the "T" series going as high as 308, plus twelve in Wreck train service (with a "W" prefix) and one odd man out numbered X111.

These rosters all specify coal and water capacity. For example, T-239 was rated for 16 tons of coal and 8000 gallons of water.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jun 10, 2020 4:49 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] C&O MW Tenders

Friends,

Attached are four views of former C&O steam locomotive tenders downgraded to MW service, which makes them "sort-of freight" cars. 

From the photos Bill McClure shared a few weeks back, I gather that most C&O outfit trains included at least one tender. Possibly the size of the tender varied with the size of the train. They probably carried coal for heating and/or cooking stoves until this was switched to natural gas, and likely also carried water for showers. I'm not sure if the water was fit to drink; MW tank cars for this purpose on some roads were marked "potable water". I see no such markings here.

All four cars were located together in Gordonsville, Virginia, around 1985-1986. There was quite a bit of old MW equipment held here at that time for eventual scrapping.

Enjoy the photos. Comments are always welcome.

Next time, Burro cranes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆



Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Mont,

Yes, the C&O coal tower here in Charlottesville was retained for sanding until the yard was downsized around 1989. The tower is still standing, though derelict. Somebody bought it to turn into a dwelling, but that project went down the tubes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 8:17 AM Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...> wrote:

Garth and all,

 

Many (most?) coaling towers also had provisions for storing and dispensing sand.  That function kept some coaling towers in use well beyond their time.

 

The two that I am most familiar with are the Monon at Lafayette, IN, Shops and the K&IT Youngtown Yard in Louisville, KY.  Both were dispensing sand into the late 1960's.  Both were built from reinforced concrete.

 

Mont Switzer 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford [mallardlodge1000@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2020 4:57 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] C&O MW Tenders

Mel,

I think the bunkers continued to be used for some years to supply coal for heating and possibly cooking needs to the MW trains, as stated in my original post. Maybe not. Some C&O maven might be able to add more to this.

This raises an interesting question. How were the bunkers refilled after steam was discontinued? A conveyor of some sort, or were at least some coal towers maintained and kept loaded for the MW trains? Hmmm. And how long did coal stoves last in cabooses. Or did the end of steam and a ready coal supply abruptly bring on conversion of camp cars and cabooses to gas or oil heating?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆



On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 5:35 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
garth:
were the fuel bunkers converted also?
thanks
mel perry


On Wed, Jun 10, 2020, 1:50 PM Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Friends,

Attached are four views of former C&O steam locomotive tenders downgraded to MW service, which makes them "sort-of freight" cars. 

From the photos Bill McClure shared a few weeks back, I gather that most C&O outfit trains included at least one tender. Possibly the size of the tender varied with the size of the train. They probably carried coal for heating and/or cooking stoves until this was switched to natural gas, and likely also carried water for showers. I'm not sure if the water was fit to drink; MW tank cars for this purpose on some roads were marked "potable water". I see no such markings here.

All four cars were located together in Gordonsville, Virginia, around 1985-1986. There was quite a bit of old MW equipment held here at that time for eventual scrapping.

Enjoy the photos. Comments are always welcome.

Next time, Burro cranes.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Attachments: