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Photo: PRR Flatcar 47068 With Grader Load


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRR Flatcar 47068 With Grader Load

A 1948 photo from the Newberry Library:

http://collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/nby_rrlife/id/305/rec/49

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

It's my understanding, based on comments by a professional railroader who was a load inspector, that the blades of earth moving equipment normally were blocked, separating the blade from the car deck. Apparently not so in this photo.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


 

Have an aerial view of the ramp at Santa Fe's Vernon (CA) Team. The ramp is in the lower left with heavy equipment on two flat cars above it.
Andy Jackson
Santa Fe Springs CA



Bill Keene
 

Nice photo. Good find! 

One of the loads into Burlington on my Gridley Branch could be some type of construction or road grading equipment. Considering the time period of 1952-53 a grader would be a good selection for surfacing all of those gravel county roads in east central Kansas. 

The question to the group is … does someone have recommendations for post-war to mid-‘50s construction equipment models?

Thanks & Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Jul 1, 2020, at 10:43 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: PRR Flatcar 47068 With Grader Load
A 1948 photo from the Newberry Library:
This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.
It's my understanding, based on comments by a professional railroader who was a load inspector, that the blades of earth moving equipment normally were blocked, separating the blade from the car deck. Apparently not so in this photo.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

In HO scale …

Artitech has an excellent Cat D7 dozer in several variations, and nice little gasoline crawler crane.
GHQ has a fine Cat D8 in a couple versions
Norscott has a Cat-12 road grader
Stewart has a Euclid scraper, rather crude, but workable, and just reissued
Don Mills has a Euclid bottom-dump
Many of the old ROCO Mini-Movers are useable, though the scrapers are oversized for HO
The Woodland Scenics dozer is like a Cat D8 but way undersized … with a little work it makes an acceptable HO D6
Classic Construction Models has/had several HO crawlers and dozers … but they are EXPENSIVE
First Gear has a decent IH TD-25 crawler/dozer. Unfortunately it’s a bit too modern for your specs (1959), and the working metal tracks are a bit crude. Still, not bad overall and similar to the earlier TD-24.

There may be a few others, but most are either out of scale or very crude … some near unrecognizable. There are some nice models of more modern machines, but that’s not what you requested.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jul 1, 2020, at 2:53 PM, Bill Keene via groups.io <bill41@...> wrote:

Nice photo. Good find! 

One of the loads into Burlington on my Gridley Branch could be some type of construction or road grading equipment. Considering the time period of 1952-53 a grader would be a good selection for surfacing all of those gravel county roads in east central Kansas. 

The question to the group is … does someone have recommendations for post-war to mid-‘50s construction equipment models?

Thanks & Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Jul 1, 2020, at 10:43 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: PRR Flatcar 47068 With Grader Load
A 1948 photo from the Newberry Library:
This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.
It's my understanding, based on comments by a professional railroader who was a load inspector, that the blades of earth moving equipment normally were blocked, separating the blade from the car deck. Apparently not so in this photo.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA



Richard Townsend
 

Woodland Scenics has some nice models. Rio Grande Models has a bunch of terrific construction equipment models, but I suspect they are too old for your time period, plus their website has a big CLOSED on the home page.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Keene via groups.io <bill41@...>
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Jul 1, 2020 11:53 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Flatcar 47068 With Grader Load

Nice photo. Good find! 

One of the loads into Burlington on my Gridley Branch could be some type of construction or road grading equipment. Considering the time period of 1952-53 a grader would be a good selection for surfacing all of those gravel county roads in east central Kansas. 

The question to the group is … does someone have recommendations for post-war to mid-‘50s construction equipment models?

Thanks & Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Jul 1, 2020, at 10:43 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: PRR Flatcar 47068 With Grader Load
A 1948 photo from the Newberry Library:
This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.
It's my understanding, based on comments by a professional railroader who was a load inspector, that the blades of earth moving equipment normally were blocked, separating the blade from the car deck. Apparently not so in this photo.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


gtws00
 

The Artitec are available Built up and painted or in a resin kit. They are beautiful little models.
Attached is a photo of two without the blade installed that I built from their kits. At least one will be  a load on a CB&Q Fm-11 flat.
The blade will be mounted to the deck next to the Cat D7
George Toman 


Craig Wilson
 

Attached is a photo of the Artitec dozer mounted on an NKP flatcar.  This particular version came with the blade detached.  I particularly like that the operator's seat/controls has a canvas "tarp" covering for shipping.  The Artitec items are pricey but can by justified for a single loaded car.

Craig Wilson



Daniel A. Mitchell
 

I agree that Artitec models are “pricey”, but compared to what? Their product is of far better quality than most of their competition. The only comparable items I can think of are a few soft-metal kits that also are not cheap, and some (perhaps even better) investment-cast brass models that are about four times pricier yet!

Example: Classic Construction Models 1:87 Cat D11R Carrydozer Track-Type Tractor at $410!  That’s right, over $400 for little HO crawler tractor.  It is a beautiful little model with fully working tracks (vastly nicer than the crude working tracks on the First Gear IH tractor). While this is a far more modern tractor than being discussed, and a large one at that, it makes the Artistic model seem inexpensive in comparison.

CCM has done a number of other HO models at very high prices, including some stripping shovels and draglines selling at over $4000.

“You gets what you pays for” (sometimes less but rarely more).

Dan MItchell
==========

On Jul 2, 2020, at 11:24 AM, Craig Wilson <agecompanyphotog@...> wrote:

Attached is a photo of the Artitec dozer mounted on an NKP flatcar.  This particular version came with the blade detached.  I particularly like that the operator's seat/controls has a canvas "tarp" covering for shipping.  The Artitec items are pricey but can by justified for a single loaded car.

Craig Wilson


<FM.NKP3307.NKP3290.jpg>


Eric Hansmann
 

A nice summary of the Artitec Cat D7 Kit construction was authored by George Toman and posted on the Resin Car Works blog in January 2019. 

The post illustrates the kit quality and should give any reader a solid start on building one. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Jul 2, 2020, at 1:56 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

I agree that Artitec models are “pricey”, but compared to what? Their product is of far better quality than most of their competition. The only comparable items I can think of are a few soft-metal kits that also are not cheap, and some (perhaps even better) investment-cast brass models that are about four times pricier yet!

Example: Classic Construction Models 1:87 Cat D11R Carrydozer Track-Type Tractor at $410!  That’s right, over $400 for little HO crawler tractor.  It is a beautiful little model with fully working tracks (vastly nicer than the crude working tracks on the First Gear IH tractor). While this is a far more modern tractor than being discussed, and a large one at that, it makes the Artistic model seem inexpensive in comparison.

CCM has done a number of other HO models at very high prices, including some stripping shovels and draglines selling at over $4000.

“You gets what you pays for” (sometimes less but rarely more).

Dan MItchell
==========


al_brown03
 

I haven't loaded my pretty little Artitec D7 onto a flatcar yet, because I'm not sure what car is appropriate: 40-foot? 50-foot? 40-ton? 50-ton? 70-ton?

TIA,

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

The Artitec model Cat D7 is a WWII vintage machine. With minor modifications it is typical of such crawlers made from the 1930s to 1950’s. Of course they lasted much longer, and some are still around. Such early model Cat D7, similar to the Artitec model, weighs about 12 tons. Add a couple more for the blade and winch … perhaps 16 tons max. Thus any common flatcar can carry one, and most could carry two.

The D7’s larger stablemate, the D8, is in the 18-20 ton range depending on accessories. The GHQ Cat D8 is also a WWII vintage machine.

Modern D7 crawlers are larger and heavier, and look different.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jul 2, 2020, at 4:15 PM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

A nice summary of the Artitec Cat D7 Kit construction was authored by George Toman and posted on the Resin Car Works blog in January 2019. 

The post illustrates the kit quality and should give any reader a solid start on building one. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Jul 2, 2020, at 1:56 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

I agree that Artitec models are “pricey”, but compared to what? Their product is of far better quality than most of their competition. The only comparable items I can think of are a few soft-metal kits that also are not cheap, and some (perhaps even better) investment-cast brass models that are about four times pricier yet!

Example: Classic Construction Models 1:87 Cat D11R Carrydozer Track-Type Tractor at $410!  That’s right, over $400 for little HO crawler tractor.  It is a beautiful little model with fully working tracks (vastly nicer than the crude working tracks on the First Gear IH tractor). While this is a far more modern tractor than being discussed, and a large one at that, it makes the Artistic model seem inexpensive in comparison.

CCM has done a number of other HO models at very high prices, including some stripping shovels and draglines selling at over $4000.

“You gets what you pays for” (sometimes less but rarely more).

Dan MItchell
==========


Bruce Smith
 

Al,

1938-
Length 160 in (410 cm)
Width 97 in (250 cm)
Height 96 in (240 cm)
Weight 31,870 lb (14,460 kg)

One will easily fit on a 40 foot, 40-ton flat. Two can probably fit.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of al_brown03 <abrown@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 3:32 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Flatcar 47068 With Grader Load
 
I haven't loaded my pretty little Artitec D7 onto a flatcar yet, because I'm not sure what car is appropriate: 40-foot? 50-foot? 40-ton? 50-ton? 70-ton?

TIA,

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Mont Switzer
 

Al,

When I was building D-8's I talked to a guy who owned one or two of them.   I concluded from the conversation that a 70T flat would not handle 2 of them. 

I've googled other CAT models and base data was pretty complete.  Many CAT model designations remained consistent over the years. 

You can buy  pre and post CAT touch up paint at many farm/fleet stores.  The color changed around 1970 when they took the lead out of their paint. 

Mont Switzer 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: al_brown03 <abrown@...>
Date: 7/2/20 4:32 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Flatcar 47068 With Grader Load

I haven't loaded my pretty little Artitec D7 onto a flatcar yet, because I'm not sure what car is appropriate: 40-foot? 50-foot? 40-ton? 50-ton? 70-ton?

TIA,

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


al_brown03
 

Thanks everyone! A 40-footer it is.

AL B.