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Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)


Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, Aug 6, 2020 at 09:57 AM, Douglas Harding wrote:

I would second the suggestion the gons contain forms for concrete work. Look like larger versions of the forms I remember using when pouring foundation walls.

 

I also agree. While most of the panel form systems for residential work were plywood, or plywood on a steel frame, A lot of the really big panel forms meant to be set in place with a crane were steel or aluminum fabrications.
http://www.aluminumconcreteforms.com/crane_set_concrete_forms.htm

Dennis Storzek


Douglas Harding
 

I would second the suggestion the gons contain forms for concrete work. Look like larger versions of the forms I remember using when pouring foundation walls.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of mopacfirst
Sent: Thursday, August 6, 2020 11:27 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

 

Those could very well literally be 'forms' for concrete work, either for a retaining wall (dike or levee) or a large formed concrete structure.  Could have been something being constructed at the time of the explosion.  Texas City and the areas near Galveston have had levees for a long time, and they use concrete walls in areas where there isn't room for an earthen dike, and sometimes there was a concrete wall at the core of an earthen levee.

Ron Merrick


Richard Townsend
 

The one just beyond that has a different type of curved roof: concave.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: gary laakso <vasa0vasa@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Aug 6, 2020 9:25 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

The curved rood boxcar next to the #3 on the print, very likely is Northern Pacific.
 
Gary Laakso
Northwest of Mike Brock
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 6, 2020 9:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)
 
Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)
A photo from the Portal To Texas History website:
Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.
Site of the Texas City disaster.
Can anyone identify the loads with more specificity? Caption says "large forms".
Thanks
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


mopacfirst
 

Those could very well literally be 'forms' for concrete work, either for a retaining wall (dike or levee) or a large formed concrete structure.  Could have been something being constructed at the time of the explosion.  Texas City and the areas near Galveston have had levees for a long time, and they use concrete walls in areas where there isn't room for an earthen dike, and sometimes there was a concrete wall at the core of an earthen levee.

Ron Merrick


gary laakso
 

The curved rood boxcar next to the #3 on the print, very likely is Northern Pacific.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 6, 2020 9:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

 

Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

A photo from the Portal To Texas History website:

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth11869/m1/1/?q=freight%20yard

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Site of the Texas City disaster.

Can anyone identify the loads with more specificity? Caption says "large forms".

Thanks

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Gondolas With "Large Forms" Loads (1947)

A photo from the Portal To Texas History website:

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth11869/m1/1/?q=freight%20yard

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Site of the Texas City disaster.

Can anyone identify the loads with more specificity? Caption says "large forms".

Thanks

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA