Topics

automobile boxcars


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Jim and List Members,
 
Jim wrote: "Back in 1922, judge for yourself however to me, it does appear the automakers were getting 5 autos in 50 foot cars"
 
Interesting reading, thanks Jim for the scan of the letter. I would say though, that in 1922, 50 foot boxcars would have been somewhat rare in railroading in general.
 
That being said, Railmodel Journal July 1995 page 16 sez "The Northern pacific was an early exponent of 50-foot auto cars, receiving a 1,000 cars [sic] in the 6000-6999 series from General American in 1923"
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: np328
Sent: Friday, December 04, 2020 2:55 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] automobile boxcars

While looking through some paperwork, I recalled a post from last month where Tim O' asked "could it handle 5 autos inside?"
While providing no answers to the 16 foot opening or the 16F5 , read the middle paragraph of the attachment. 
Back in 1922, judge for yourself however to me, it does appear the automakers were getting 5 autos in 50 foot cars.    Jim Dick - St. Paul, MN


np328
 

While looking through some paperwork, I recalled a post from last month where Tim O' asked "could it handle 5 autos inside?"
While providing no answers to the 16 foot opening or the 16F5 , read the middle paragraph of the attachment. 
Back in 1922, judge for yourself however to me, it does appear the automakers were getting 5 autos in 50 foot cars.    Jim Dick - St. Paul, MN


Tim O'Connor
 

Garth

16F-5 yes

I don't know what it means - but the car has a 16 foot wide door opening - could it handle 5 autos inside?


On 11/20/2020 12:08 PM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford wrote:
Tim and friends,

What I didn't see mentioned in this thread (or missed) is the coding on and below the strip. Did this indicate the make and model of vehicle for which these racks were configured, or was it a pool number which would pretty much amount to the same thing? As models changed, particularly as wheelbases changed, the Evans racks had to be adjusted or modified to fit. I can't read what's on the strip, but the text below it seems to read "16F5".

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

 

On Fri, Nov 20, 2020 at 11:13 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Here is a better view of the white stripe on an SP XMR car repainted in 1958. This car also has the 'combination' roof
for stowage of the interior automobile rack.


On 11/19/2020 11:04 PM, Guy Wilber via groups.io wrote:
Bill wrote:

“One of the comments says, The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).”

The 3” wide white stripe was the original standard marking for cars equipped with auto loading devices as adopted by the ARA in 1933.  The stripe was to be applied to the right door, though (early on) many roads decorated both doors.  

The right door on SP 64210 is obscured by the automobile, but the stripe is (more than likely) there.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Guy Wilber
 

Bob Chaparro asked,

“Was the white stripe requirement ever dropped?”

Not within the timeframe of this list.  I doubt it was ever dropped, the cars simply fell out of favor as railroads progressed with larger open rack type equipment of the late 1950s and into the 1960s. 

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

N

Not

_,_._,_


william darnaby
 

My NMRA reprint of the 1/53 ORER has all of this info on page 721 just preceding a 9 page listing of all cars for all roads so equipped.  Check your ORER’s of that period.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Guy Wilber via groups.io
Sent: Friday, November 20, 2020 11:48 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] automobile boxcars

 

Garth Groff wrote:

 

“What I didn't see mentioned in this thread (or missed) is the coding on and below the strip. Did this indicate the make and model of vehicle for which these racks were configured, or was it a pool number which would pretty much amount to the same thing? As models changed, particularly as wheelbases changed, the Evans racks had to be adjusted or modified to fit. I can't read what's on the strip, but the text below it seems to read "16F5"

 

The door marking had nothing to do with makes and models of automobiles.

 

Evans Type “F” Auto Loaders with a total of 16 chain tubes or a combination of tubes and floor brackets to accommodate five automobiles.  Typically, only in a fifty foot car.

 

Guy Wilber

Reno, Nevada


Guy Wilber
 

Garth Groff wrote:

“What I didn't see mentioned in this thread (or missed) is the coding on and below the strip. Did this indicate the make and model of vehicle for which these racks were configured, or was it a pool number which would pretty much amount to the same thing? As models changed, particularly as wheelbases changed, the Evans racks had to be adjusted or modified to fit. I can't read what's on the strip, but the text below it seems to read "16F5".

The door marking had nothing to do with makes and models of automobiles.

Evans Type “F” Auto Loaders with a total of 16 chain tubes or a combination of tubes and floor brackets to accommodate five automobiles.  Typically, only in a fifty foot car.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


vapeurchapelon
 

When I see the bulbous end I think loading/ unloading must have been very rough... ;-)
 
Johannes
Modeling the early postwar years up to about 1953
 
Gesendet: Freitag, 20. November 2020 um 17:13 Uhr
Von: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] automobile boxcars

Here is a better view of the white stripe on an SP XMR car repainted in 1958. This car also has the 'combination' roof
for stowage of the interior automobile rack.


On 11/19/2020 11:04 PM, Guy Wilber via groups.io wrote:
Bill wrote:
 
“One of the comments says, The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).”
 
The 3” wide white stripe was the original standard marking for cars equipped with auto loading devices as adopted by the ARA in 1933.  The stripe was to be applied to the right door, though (early on) many roads decorated both doors.  
 
The right door on SP 64210 is obscured by the automobile, but the stripe is (more than likely) there.
 
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Kenneth Montero
 

Notice the tubes sticking below the floor. Chains used with the loaders were stored there when not in used with the auto-loaders.
 
Ken Montero

On 11/20/2020 11:13 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
 
 

Here is a better view of the white stripe on an SP XMR car repainted in 1958. This car also has the 'combination' roof
for stowage of the interior automobile rack.


On 11/19/2020 11:04 PM, Guy Wilber via groups.io wrote:
Bill wrote:
 
“One of the comments says, The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).”
 
The 3” wide white stripe was the original standard marking for cars equipped with auto loading devices as adopted by the ARA in 1933.  The stripe was to be applied to the right door, though (early on) many roads decorated both doors.  
 
The right door on SP 64210 is obscured by the automobile, but the stripe is (more than likely) there.
 
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Bob Chaparro
 

Was the white stripe requirement ever dropped?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Tim and friends,

What I didn't see mentioned in this thread (or missed) is the coding on and below the strip. Did this indicate the make and model of vehicle for which these racks were configured, or was it a pool number which would pretty much amount to the same thing? As models changed, particularly as wheelbases changed, the Evans racks had to be adjusted or modified to fit. I can't read what's on the strip, but the text below it seems to read "16F5".

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

 

On Fri, Nov 20, 2020 at 11:13 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Here is a better view of the white stripe on an SP XMR car repainted in 1958. This car also has the 'combination' roof
for stowage of the interior automobile rack.


On 11/19/2020 11:04 PM, Guy Wilber via groups.io wrote:
Bill wrote:

“One of the comments says, The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).”

The 3” wide white stripe was the original standard marking for cars equipped with auto loading devices as adopted by the ARA in 1933.  The stripe was to be applied to the right door, though (early on) many roads decorated both doors.  

The right door on SP 64210 is obscured by the automobile, but the stripe is (more than likely) there.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


Here is a better view of the white stripe on an SP XMR car repainted in 1958. This car also has the 'combination' roof
for stowage of the interior automobile rack.


On 11/19/2020 11:04 PM, Guy Wilber via groups.io wrote:
Bill wrote:

“One of the comments says, The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).”

The 3” wide white stripe was the original standard marking for cars equipped with auto loading devices as adopted by the ARA in 1933.  The stripe was to be applied to the right door, though (early on) many roads decorated both doors.  

The right door on SP 64210 is obscured by the automobile, but the stripe is (more than likely) there.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Guy Wilber
 

Bill,

You are most welcome, but I jumped the gun...follows is the correct date and information from an earlier post.

The ARA adopted the white stripe as an indicator for cars equipped with permanent auto racks on May 3, 1934. As originally adopted Note 13 to Figure 1 of the Manual read: Note 13-- For automobile boxcars, equipped with automobile loading racks, a 3-inch white stripe is to be painted on the right hand door, facing side of cars, extending full width of door, approximately 3 feet above the floor line and, immediately above this stripe the words, "Auto Rack" are to be stenciled in white letters 2 inches high; this marking to be applied to both sides of car. 

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada
,_


Bill Parks
 

Guy - 

Thanks for the info

--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Guy Wilber
 

Bill wrote:

“One of the comments says, The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).”

The 3” wide white stripe was the original standard marking for cars equipped with auto loading devices as adopted by the ARA in 1933.  The stripe was to be applied to the right door, though (early on) many roads decorated both doors.  

The right door on SP 64210 is obscured by the automobile, but the stripe is (more than likely) there.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada



Bill Parks
 

One of the comments says "The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).

--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


mel perry