Okay You Gondola Devotees


gary laakso
 

While the company service tank cars and the DRGW 4-8-4 are extra eye candy, the DGRW gondola in the foreground on the left is the subject of this question.  What are the cut holes on the side of the car for?  I have not seen that feature in a gondola before.  Note too, the gusset plates cover part of the inside of the car, not just the top of the end and side.   The car also has wonderful residue of gunk in it that has not been cleaned out.

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1947-Jan-Salt-Lake-City/i-DsQZffL/A 

 

Gary “I know the Grande did things differently” Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Richard Townsend
 

I think what you are seeing is the side sheathing angling in toward the center of the car, not cut out holes. You can see that on the inside of the car relative to the opposite side.


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Gary,

Look at the similar car in the upper right of this photo to see what Richard means.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  

On Wed, Dec 2, 2020 at 1:05 PM Richard Townsend via groups.io <richtownsend=netscape.net@groups.io> wrote:
I think what you are seeing is the side sheathing angling in toward the center of the car, not cut out holes. You can see that on the inside of the car relative to the opposite side.






Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Gary,

Looks like a drop-bottom gon to me.

Pax,


Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

-----------------------------------------

From: "gary laakso"
To: "stmfc"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday December 2 2020 12:58:35PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Okay You Gondola Devotees

While the company service tank cars and the DRGW 4-8-4 are extra eye candy, the DGRW gondola in the foreground on the left is the subject of this question.  What are the cut holes on the side of the car for?  I have not seen that feature in a gondola before.  Note too, the gusset plates cover part of the inside of the car, not just the top of the end and side.   The car also has wonderful residue of gunk in it that has not been cleaned out.

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1947-Jan-Salt-Lake-City/i-DsQZffL/A 

 

Gary “I know the Grande did things differently” Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


gary laakso
 

Hi Ralph:

 

It is.  Look at the top of the double riveted strap between the Rio and Grande.  There is at the top of the strap a cut into the side of the gondola and there are 5 others along the side near the top.  Yes, it is a drop-bottom but what at the 6 cuts at the top of the sides for?

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ralph W. Brown
Sent: Wednesday, December 2, 2020 11:51 AM
To: 'main@RealSTMFC.groups.io' <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Okay You Gondola Devotees

 

Hi Gary,

 

Looks like a drop-bottom gon to me.

 

Pax,

 

 

Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

-----------------------------------------

From: "gary laakso"
To: "stmfc"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday December 2 2020 12:58:35PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Okay You Gondola Devotees


While the company service tank cars and the DRGW 4-8-4 are extra eye candy, the DGRW gondola in the foreground on the left is the subject of this question.  What are the cut holes on the side of the car for?  I have not seen that feature in a gondola before.  Note too, the gusset plates cover part of the inside of the car, not just the top of the end and side.   The car also has wonderful residue of gunk in it that has not been cleaned out.

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1947-Jan-Salt-Lake-City/i-DsQZffL/A 

 

Gary “I know the Grande did things differently” Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


vapeurchapelon
 

Gary,
 
there are no open cuts! The inside vertical ribs are coming THROUGH the side wall at that area, and they are still vertical, and what you think are cuts are just the shadows of those ribs.
 
Greetings
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953
 
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 02. Dezember 2020 um 20:57 Uhr
Von: "gary laakso" <vasa0vasa@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] Okay You Gondola Devotees

Hi Ralph:

 

It is.  Look at the top of the double riveted strap between the Rio and Grande.  There is at the top of the strap a cut into the side of the gondola and there are 5 others along the side near the top.  Yes, it is a drop-bottom but what at the 6 cuts at the top of the sides for?

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ralph W. Brown
Sent: Wednesday, December 2, 2020 11:51 AM
To: 'main@RealSTMFC.groups.io' <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Okay You Gondola Devotees

 

Hi Gary,

 

Looks like a drop-bottom gon to me.

 

Pax,

 

 

Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

-----------------------------------------

From: "gary laakso"
To: "stmfc"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday December 2 2020 12:58:35PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Okay You Gondola Devotees

 

While the company service tank cars and the DRGW 4-8-4 are extra eye candy, the DGRW gondola in the foreground on the left is the subject of this question.  What are the cut holes on the side of the car for?  I have not seen that feature in a gondola before.  Note too, the gusset plates cover part of the inside of the car, not just the top of the end and side.   The car also has wonderful residue of gunk in it that has not been cleaned out.

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1947-Jan-Salt-Lake-City/i-DsQZffL/A 

 

Gary “I know the Grande did things differently” Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 


Douglas Harding
 

That is a drop bottom gon. Some of the doors are open inside. And the bottom of the sides slope inward. There is a structural brace running along the side below the side

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gary laakso
Sent: Wednesday, December 2, 2020 11:58 AM
To: 'stmfc' <realstmfc@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Okay You Gondola Devotees

 

While the company service tank cars and the DRGW 4-8-4 are extra eye candy, the DGRW gondola in the foreground on the left is the subject of this question.  What are the cut holes on the side of the car for?  I have not seen that feature in a gondola before.  Note too, the gusset plates cover part of the inside of the car, not just the top of the end and side.   The car also has wonderful residue of gunk in it that has not been cleaned out.

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1947-Jan-Salt-Lake-City/i-DsQZffL/A 

 

Gary “I know the Grande did things differently” Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Corey Bonsall
 

<cracks knuckles>

To start with, those are either the big 70k series (46ft IL, b 1922) or it's little cousin 45k series (42ft IL, b 1926) offset gondolas.  Built a bit different (and larger) than almost any other GS gondola of the period.

The low angle lighting, coupled with the traditional wintertime inversion smog of the SLC valley makes those shadows look like a feature or a hole, but if they were, I think we would see a different shade.

Regarding the top feature:  think about how an offset hopper of the same era has the added pressed steel stampings at the top of the bulge of the car outside, in order to continue the stress member rib from the inside of the car to the outside on it's way up to the top rail.  This is the same thing, although much shorter.  These cars had the sides come in towards the center for the last 6 inches or so of height, and needed something to connect the width of the top rail to the inside support rib, in this case a pressed Z shape ,with all of the mind-smashing angles to allow pass-through rivets to connect it all together and make a solid load-supporting member.

All of the early D&RGW GS Gons (36ft 40000-42500, 40ft 43000-43349, 42ft 45000-45499, and 46ft 70000-70699) had interior ribs; the 36ft & 40ft had 3, the 42ft & 46ft offset had 7 ribs per side.  The little cousin 36ft 40k series up in the right hand corner looks like it has one for each exterior rib, because the 10 inch wooden extension boards to increase cubic capacity needed something added to tie it back into the main structure.

And the top corner gussets?  It seems to be hit or miss on a lot of the drop bottom cars I've seen, but considering the inside ribs would make loading anything other than loose loads a challenge (can't stack crates or mill products the full width), that overhang isn't really eating any cubic space above it, and might give the corner some added tension strength if cramming it full of something dense and somewhat fluid.

My two cents, considering the time I've spent studying on those glorious battleships...

Corey Bonsall


akerboomk
 

Same general principle as an offset side hopper


--
Ken Akerboom


dave w
 

On Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 10:37 AM, Corey Bonsall wrote:
but considering the inside ribs would make loading anything other than loose loads a challenge
Given the huge volumes of commerce based around coal dispersal on and off the RG, then old ones diverted to a variety of other bulk products on the road when the first hoppers arrived in 1953, there isn't really a problem of retaining them in revenue service. The Grande wasted nothing as you know, and the extreme life expectancy was one of the ways of getting ROI they enjoyed (and demanded of operations),
regards davew