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[Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Erie Gondola with Slope Sheets


Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Todd;

 

Glad you asked!

 

This was an event dreaded by most, when things got out of control under the “floor” of the blast furnace, and it required draining of the molten iron mass into something called The Salamander, due to its shape.  Think pigs, but much, much bigger.  This was a dangerous process.

 

The demands of WW2 caused the loss of many specialized people from the industry, and replacement with people that often didn’t know what they were looking at.

 

There were signs a blast furnace was going out of control.  If it did, they literally had to drill through the walls containing the base beneath the floor, then dig slowly through until they could tap the salamander into the sand beds pictured.

 

This process ate up HUNDREDS of freight cars for wall debris, fill removal, cinder removal, burden removal, and cooled salamander material (mostly iron broken up) recycling.  Those cars are proof of process.

 

There are extremely few photos that show this event.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Todd Sullivan via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2020 5:33 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Erie Gondola with Slope Sheets

 

OK, Elden, I'll bite.  What's the salamander?

Todd Sullivan


Todd Sullivan
 

OK, Elden, I'll bite.  What's the salamander?

Todd Sullivan


Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Group;

 

These are two of my favorites:  tapping the salamander at USS’s Carrie Furnace #4, 1941. 

 

There’s the same Erie class gon back there under the tap floor of the blast furnace, if I am seeing this right.  Not yet converted to hopper bottom.

 

There was a lot of debris generated in a tap of the salamander, hence the URR twin and Erie gon.

 

This would make a FABULOUS modeling scene or switching layout!

 

Ask me about the salamander……

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Barry
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2020 1:55 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Erie Gondola with Slope Sheets

 

Garth,

 

Despite the pesky pipe, I read the number as Erie 37511, as documented in Steve's diagram and line 46, page 174 of the Jan 53 ORER.  It's listed as an HT; Hopper, 4 hopper Cross Dump, All Steel, Self-Clearing.  44' IL, 9'5 IW, 9'4 height above rail.

 

John Barry

 

ATSF North Bay Lines 

Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

Lovettsville, VA

 

 

707-490-9696 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Tuesday, December 22, 2020, 11:41:41 AM EST, Steve and Barb Hile <shile@...> wrote:

 

 

Here is the diagram sheet for anyone interested.

 

Steve Hile

 

Here is the diagram sheet for anyone who is interested.

 

Steve Hile

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2020 10:25 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Erie Gondola with Slope Sheets

 

The December 1940 Model Railroader featured plans and a builder image of the original version of the Erie 70-ton coal gons. I think the sloped sheets and hopper discharge doors were a late 1930s modification. Attached is a photo of a slightly different view and a 1923 builder image.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2020 8:39 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Erie Gondola with Slope Sheets

 

Garth Groff wrote:

"Today I was scanning some interurban photos of the Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley (Laurel Line). In the background of one I spotted this very unusual Erie hopper/gondola which I offer for your enlightenment, commentary and . . . well, why not say it . . . entertainment. 

 

The car appears to be about 40', but with sides around 9' above the rail, much lower than the adjacent hoppers (probably around 10' 3" or 10' 4" from the rails). At first glance this appears to be a gondola, but the end in front of the Lackawanna diesel shows clearly that it has sloped end sheets. As bad luck would have it, the fence railing runs right through the car number in this photo! The photo was shot in February 1952, but I see nothing like this in my 1958 ORER."

 

We've discussed these cars before - these gons are the basis of the Lindberg (later Mantua Heavies) gon.  They were originally built with drop doors, then later rebuilt to hopper-bottom gons.  Do a search in the group archives.

 

 

Ben Hom