NP 5418


Richard Remiarz
 

Yesterday I completed NP 5418, a 50’ single sheath auto boxcar built from a Speedwitch kit.  I adding Intermountain 0.088” wheelsets to the TMW Dalman trucks, Kadee #178 coupers, and HiTech Details 6038 air hoses.  The car was painted with TruColor TCP-193 NP 1930-45 Freight Car Brown.

 

Weathering was done by coloring random boards with Prismacolor 30% warm grey, terra cotta, light umber, Tuscan red, and sienna brown colored pencils.  Pan Pastel Permanent Red Extra Dark was used to tone down the lettering and colored pencils, followed by Pan Pastel black for weathering.  Speedwitch chalk mark decals were used, along with Polly Scale Grimy Black on the wheel faces and Polly Scale Rust on the couplers and trucks.

 

Sincerely,

Rich Remiarz

Vadnais Heights, MN

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Paul Doggett
 

Rich 

It looks really good.


Paul Doggett.     England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 3 Jan 2021, at 18:48, Richard Remiarz <rremiarz@...> wrote:



Yesterday I completed NP 5418, a 50’ single sheath auto boxcar built from a Speedwitch kit.  I adding Intermountain 0.088” wheelsets to the TMW Dalman trucks, Kadee #178 coupers, and HiTech Details 6038 air hoses.  The car was painted with TruColor TCP-193 NP 1930-45 Freight Car Brown.

 

Weathering was done by coloring random boards with Prismacolor 30% warm grey, terra cotta, light umber, Tuscan red, and sienna brown colored pencils.  Pan Pastel Permanent Red Extra Dark was used to tone down the lettering and colored pencils, followed by Pan Pastel black for weathering.  Speedwitch chalk mark decals were used, along with Polly Scale Grimy Black on the wheel faces and Polly Scale Rust on the couplers and trucks.

 

Sincerely,

Rich Remiarz

Vadnais Heights, MN

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

Attachments:


Tony Thompson
 

Very good-looking car, Rich. I have always liked 50-ft. single-sheath cars, especially ones with lots of diagonal braces, like this one.

Tony Thompson




James Brewer
 

Nice build Rich; excellent subtle weathering.

Jim Brewer


Eric Lombard
 

Nice models, Rich!

On Sun, Jan 3, 2021 at 12:53 PM Paul Doggett via groups.io <paul.doggett2472=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Rich 

It looks really good.


Paul Doggett.     England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 3 Jan 2021, at 18:48, Richard Remiarz <rremiarz@...> wrote:



Yesterday I completed NP 5418, a 50’ single sheath auto boxcar built from a Speedwitch kit.  I adding Intermountain 0.088” wheelsets to the TMW Dalman trucks, Kadee #178 coupers, and HiTech Details 6038 air hoses.  The car was painted with TruColor TCP-193 NP 1930-45 Freight Car Brown.

 

Weathering was done by coloring random boards with Prismacolor 30% warm grey, terra cotta, light umber, Tuscan red, and sienna brown colored pencils.  Pan Pastel Permanent Red Extra Dark was used to tone down the lettering and colored pencils, followed by Pan Pastel black for weathering.  Speedwitch chalk mark decals were used, along with Polly Scale Grimy Black on the wheel faces and Polly Scale Rust on the couplers and trucks.

 

Sincerely,

Rich Remiarz

Vadnais Heights, MN

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

Attachments:


Clark Propst
 

Good looking car Rich!

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


James E Kubanick
 

Rich,

Nice looking car. I love those Speedwiitch kits. Always a fun and satisfying experience with a rewarding result! 

Jim Kubanick
Morgantown WV

On Sunday, January 3, 2021, 3:40:33 PM EST, Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:


Good looking car Rich!

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Bill Keene
 

Wonderful work!

And a big THANK YOU for the weathering details. I presently have a couple of single sheathed box cars on the work bench and you have provided a good education in how to apply weathering detail.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Jan 3, 2021, at 10:48 AM, Richard Remiarz <rremiarz@...> wrote:

Yesterday I completed NP 5418, a 50’ single sheath auto boxcar built from a Speedwitch kit.  I adding Intermountain 0.088” wheelsets to the TMW Dalman trucks, Kadee #178 coupers, and HiTech Details 6038 air hoses.  The car was painted with TruColor TCP-193 NP 1930-45 Freight Car Brown.
 
Weathering was done by coloring random boards with Prismacolor 30% warm grey, terra cotta, light umber, Tuscan red, and sienna brown colored pencils.  Pan Pastel Permanent Red Extra Dark was used to tone down the lettering and colored pencils, followed by Pan Pastel black for weathering.  Speedwitch chalk mark decals were used, along with Polly Scale Grimy Black on the wheel faces and Polly Scale Rust on the couplers and trucks.
 
Sincerely,
Rich Remiarz
Vadnais Heights, MN
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
<NP 5418-1.jpg><NP 5418-2.jpg>


Kemal Mumcu
 

Great minds think alike eh?! I like your version of this car Rich. Nice to see the chalk marks.

Colin Meikle


radiodial868
 

Nice. I think you've also just described the standard for steam era weathering for 2021 that many of us are using. The only tweak I'm currently doing different is after painting and before the Pledge Future coat and decaling, I apply a thin wash of Turpentine and black oil paint. It gives the weathering depth for steam era cars that me applying the pan pastels at the end can't do alone.  I've also found that if you do light swipes of a tan or light gray PP on the appliances and trucks, it highlights them as you would see them if the sun was shining.
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


Tim O'Connor
 


Turpentine? Does it matter what brand of paint this is applied to?


On 1/4/2021 11:53 AM, radiodial868 wrote:
Nice. I think you've also just described the standard for steam era weathering for 2021 that many of us are using. The only tweak I'm currently doing different is after painting and before the Pledge Future coat and decaling, I apply a thin wash of Turpentine and black oil paint. It gives the weathering depth for steam era cars that me applying the pan pastels at the end can't do alone.  I've also found that if you do light swipes of a tan or light gray PP on the appliances and trucks, it highlights them as you would see them if the sun was shining.
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Bruce Smith
 

Tim,

Turpentine, or the odorless alternative, Turpenol, are effective on all artist's oil paints, regardless of brand. It is not an appropriate solvent for other types of paint. 

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2021 12:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] NP 5418
 

Turpentine? Does it matter what brand of paint this is applied to?


On 1/4/2021 11:53 AM, radiodial868 wrote:
Nice. I think you've also just described the standard for steam era weathering for 2021 that many of us are using. The only tweak I'm currently doing different is after painting and before the Pledge Future coat and decaling, I apply a thin wash of Turpentine and black oil paint. It gives the weathering depth for steam era cars that me applying the pan pastels at the end can't do alone.  I've also found that if you do light swipes of a tan or light gray PP on the appliances and trucks, it highlights them as you would see them if the sun was shining.
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Robert kirkham
 

Hi RJ, you’re achieving nice results, so what follows may not apply to what you are doing.  But my recent experience with turpentine and oils used for weathering washes was paint on two models turning into a rubbery muck that I ended up having to strip.  Lost the primer, paint and decals.   The under-paint before I applied the wash was Tamiya gray primer and Vallejo for the body colour.  I’ve since put the turpentine away and gone to water soluble oils.  Safer and just as easy to handle. 

Rob

On Jan 4, 2021, at 8:53 AM, radiodial868 <radiodial57@...> wrote:

Nice. I think you've also just described the standard for steam era weathering for 2021 that many of us are using. The only tweak I'm currently doing different is after painting and before the Pledge Future coat and decaling, I apply a thin wash of Turpentine and black oil paint. It gives the weathering depth for steam era cars that me applying the pan pastels at the end can't do alone.  I've also found that if you do light swipes of a tan or light gray PP on the appliances and trucks, it highlights them as you would see them if the sun was shining.
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Turpentine? Does it matter what brand of paint this is applied to?

  YES! YES! I recommend people NOT put turpentine on models until they know it is compatible with the previous finish. Don't ask how I know to say this.

Tony Thompson




Drew Bunn
 

I'll second Mr Thompson. Turpentine tends to eat most varieties of plastic. Again, ask me how I know..


On Mon., Jan. 4, 2021, 14:56 Tony Thompson, <tony@...> wrote:
Tim O'Connor wrote:

Turpentine? Does it matter what brand of paint this is applied to?

  YES! YES! I recommend people NOT put turpentine on models until they know it is compatible with the previous finish. Don't ask how I know to say this.

Tony Thompson




william darnaby
 

I still weather a lot with an airbrush, spraying dilute Floquil earth or foundation and rail tie brown mostly on the underbody, trucks (attached less wheels) and lower areas of the body while the car is still glossy after decaling.  Then comes the Scalecoat flat finish all over the car (I use Scalecoat exclusively for cars I decal).  After a day of drying I do the oil paint wash.  Using a watercolor brush I mix burnt umber and black in a small glass cup of Turpenol, loading the brush by sticking it into the oil tubes and then swirling it around in the cup.  The mixture gets applies to the roof first and then the sides and ends, letting the wash run down.  The wash tends to collect around details like rivets, seams, ribs, etc. and collects at the bottom.  If too much collects at the bottom of the side it can be wicked up with the brush.  Because the mixing process is haphazard the amount of application varies from car to car.

 

After a day of drying the reweigh and repack data and background paint is applied with decals over the oil wash.  Decal chalk mark decals are also applied at this time.  Then it is a final application of Scalecoat flat to kill the shine of these decals.  Finally, accents with Pan Pastels are applied.

 

Your mileage may vary, of course.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2021 12:36 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] NP 5418

 

Tim,

 

Turpentine, or the odorless alternative, Turpenol, are effective on all artist's oil paints, regardless of brand. It is not an appropriate solvent for other types of paint. 

 

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2021 12:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] NP 5418

 


Turpentine? Does it matter what brand of paint this is applied to?


On 1/4/2021 11:53 AM, radiodial868 wrote:

Nice. I think you've also just described the standard for steam era weathering for 2021 that many of us are using. The only tweak I'm currently doing different is after painting and before the Pledge Future coat and decaling, I apply a thin wash of Turpentine and black oil paint. It gives the weathering depth for steam era cars that me applying the pan pastels at the end can't do alone.  I've also found that if you do light swipes of a tan or light gray PP on the appliances and trucks, it highlights them as you would see them if the sun was shining.
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


Thanks Rob, I suspected there might be issues with turpentine and some brands of paint. I admire the
results people get with oils but I've never been successful with them.



On 1/4/2021 1:38 PM, Robert kirkham wrote:
Hi RJ, you’re achieving nice results, so what follows may not apply to what you are doing.  But my recent experience with turpentine and oils used for weathering washes was paint on two models turning into a rubbery muck that I ended up having to strip.  Lost the primer, paint and decals.   The under-paint before I applied the wash was Tamiya gray primer and Vallejo for the body colour.  I’ve since put the turpentine away and gone to water soluble oils.  Safer and just as easy to handle. 

Rob

On Jan 4, 2021, at 8:53 AM, radiodial868 <radiodial57@...> wrote:

Nice. I think you've also just described the standard for steam era weathering for 2021 that many of us are using. The only tweak I'm currently doing different is after painting and before the Pledge Future coat and decaling, I apply a thin wash of Turpentine and black oil paint. It gives the weathering depth for steam era cars that me applying the pan pastels at the end can't do alone.  I've also found that if you do light swipes of a tan or light gray PP on the appliances and trucks, it highlights them as you would see them if the sun was shining.
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


Very interesting Bill ! I usually don't use SC flat because of its high talc content, but that's good to
know. I still have a couple of bottles left of Floquil flat - not glaze - which is clearer than SC. I will
experiment with the Turpenol over Floquil and see what happens... :-)


On 1/4/2021 7:56 PM, william darnaby wrote:

I still weather a lot with an airbrush, spraying dilute Floquil earth or foundation and rail tie brown mostly on the underbody, trucks (attached less wheels) and lower areas of the body while the car is still glossy after decaling.  Then comes the Scalecoat flat finish all over the car (I use Scalecoat exclusively for cars I decal).  After a day of drying I do the oil paint wash.  Using a watercolor brush I mix burnt umber and black in a small glass cup of Turpenol, loading the brush by sticking it into the oil tubes and then swirling it around in the cup.  The mixture gets applies to the roof first and then the sides and ends, letting the wash run down.  The wash tends to collect around details like rivets, seams, ribs, etc. and collects at the bottom.  If too much collects at the bottom of the side it can be wicked up with the brush.  Because the mixing process is haphazard the amount of application varies from car to car.

 

After a day of drying the reweigh and repack data and background paint is applied with decals over the oil wash.  Decal chalk mark decals are also applied at this time.  Then it is a final application of Scalecoat flat to kill the shine of these decals.  Finally, accents with Pan Pastels are applied.

 

Your mileage may vary, of course.

 

Bill Darnaby



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


148 of the double door single sheathed cars in series 4700 to 4997 were still in revenue service in 1965!

Incredibly, 16 double door cars are in a 1972 ORER (2 years after BN merger), and another 6 are listed
as having no doors at all. That probably means they were in veneer service.



On 1/3/2021 1:48 PM, Richard Remiarz wrote (on STMFC)

Yesterday I completed NP 5418, a 50’ single sheath auto boxcar built from a Speedwitch kit.  I adding Intermountain 0.088” wheelsets to the TMW Dalman trucks, Kadee #178 coupers, and HiTech Details 6038 air hoses.  The car was painted with TruColor TCP-193 NP 1930-45 Freight Car Brown.

 

Weathering was done by coloring random boards with Prismacolor 30% warm grey, terra cotta, light umber, Tuscan red, and sienna brown colored pencils.  Pan Pastel Permanent Red Extra Dark was used to tone down the lettering and colored pencils, followed by Pan Pastel black for weathering.  Speedwitch chalk mark decals were used, along with Polly Scale Grimy Black on the wheel faces and Polly Scale Rust on the couplers and trucks.

 

Sincerely,

Rich Remiarz

Vadnais Heights, MN

 

Attachments:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts