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Discarded sign...


Tim O'Connor
 


this is the location of the B&M's "Somerville" yard - now a large MBTA facility.

there is next to no carload traffic into Boston or its immediate suburbs anymore


On 1/12/2021 5:53 PM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
We sometime see images of large loads on flat cars that are accompanied by signs describing the item and letting the world know who the manufacturer was.
 
Ever wonder what happens to those signs after the car is unloaded?
 
Have a look at the lower right corner of this image...
 
 
The sign appears to say "BETHLEHEM STEEL", and possibly "Fabricated Steel" on the line below.
 
Other nice details to notice are the bumping post, with a pair of re-inforcement rails between the running rails, and the one rail on concrete foundation probably for a movable overhead crane. I don't know the Bostan area railroading scene very well, but there appears to be a substantial freight house and/or team tracks in the background
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Thanks, Ken, for posting this link.  Quite a bit of interesting information for railfans living in the area.  The map also shows the long-lost Miller’s river (now in a culvert and nearly invisible unless you know JUST where to look for it.  I’m surprised to see the round house labeled as “Auto truck st’ge” as I think most of that round house was still in use as such in 1935 (copyright date in small print beneath the graphic scale at the bottom).

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of akerboomk
Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2021 9:55 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Discarded sign...

 

To beat this to death, the area is seen on this Sanborn map:

            https://www.loc.gov/resource/g3764cm.g03701193401/?sp=26

 

Photographer is standing toward left side of map, picture taken looking right.

The road with the crossing gates in the picture is the “road” with “EAST” text (leading to left side of [what used to be a] roundhouse)

Gantry crane shown.

 


--
Ken Akerboom


akerboomk
 

To beat this to death, the area is seen on this Sanborn map:

            https://www.loc.gov/resource/g3764cm.g03701193401/?sp=26

 

Photographer is standing toward left side of map, picture taken looking right.

The road with the crossing gates in the picture is the “road” with “EAST” text (leading to left side of [what used to be a] roundhouse)

Gantry crane shown.

 


--
Ken Akerboom


Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 07:59 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Of course, we are likely all aware of what happened when the ERIE got that large class of Russian Decapods.
The Frisco had them too, and one ended up at the Illinois Railway Museum, where it runs on weekends during the summer. I was well acquainted with the gentleman, Dave Shore, who was the "messenger" (attendant) when it was moved to the museum. Dave related a story where, on learning the train was to pull into a yard before the Decapod was to be switched out, asking the conductor if there were any self guarding frogs in the yard. "No" was the response. Dave said about a minute later there was a loud BANG and the engine looked like it jumped up in the air. About a minute later it did it again. Dave pulled the air. Turns out the whole ladder was self guarding frogs, and the wide driver tires had actually broken the guard flanges off the two frogs it ran through. The train sat there until a switcher came in behind it and gingerly pulled the engine back out to the main and took it somewhere where there weren't any self guarding frogs.

Dennis Storzek


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Of course, we are likely all aware of what happened when the ERIE got that large class of Russian Decapods.

 

The gauge problem, narrowing the engines from 5’ gauge to American Standard, a mere 3½” difference, was done by applying new tires with a wide tread, moving the flanges inwards 1¾” on each side.  Worked real slick . . . until they encountered a self-guarding frog.  Resulted in a very rough ride, as the tread had to rise up over that hump . . .

 

The ERIE Decapods hauled lots of FREIGHT CARS.  😊

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 10:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Discarded sign...

 

David,
It's my understanding that the railroads tended to only use them on trackage not rated for "high speed", that of course being solely each railroad's decision to make in our era. Yes, the are a direct replacement for conventional frogs, but the "gathering range" of the guard flange is very short, so if wheel wear causes contact the sideways motion of the truck will be very abrupt.

Dennis Storzek


Dennis Storzek
 

David,
It's my understanding that the railroads tended to only use them on trackage not rated for "high speed", that of course being solely each railroad's decision to make in our era. Yes, the are a direct replacement for conventional frogs, but the "gathering range" of the guard flange is very short, so if wheel wear causes contact the sideways motion of the truck will be very abrupt.

Dennis Storzek


David Soderblom
 

Dennis:

Your comment on self-guarding frogs got my attention. Did they require slower speeds than “conventional “? I had thought they were just a simple substitute that needed fewer components.

Sent from my tricorder


Dennis Storzek
 

Look Ma, no guardrails. Obviously low speed secondary track as every turnout in the image has a self guarding frog.

Dennis Storzek


Schuyler Larrabee
 

I agree with you Todd, and while I did not grow up around here, at least not as an adolescent (the last ten years have been an adventure in growing up . . . ) this photo does have a tinge of the look of the B&M and the general seediness of Somerville/Charlestown about it.  Based on the GM car to the right, front wheels on the track, I’d date this picture to the early 60s.

And that B&M “shack” is undoubtedly where the gates were operated from.  Typical of that sort of “building” around these parts, it’s not quite level.  Often these shacks were not provided with a real foundation, instead just sitting on some timbers laid on the ground.

The luxuriant growth of weeds is instructive for modeling scenes like this.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Todd Sullivan via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, January 12, 2021 7:54 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Discarded sign...

 

The 'reinforcement rail' on concrete is probably one side of a mobile gantry crane setup.  This looks to be at a Boston & Maine team track near Lechmere Square.  The crossing is not unguarded: there are typical B&M crossing gates on all 4 corners of the crossing.  They may be controlled from that shack on the opposite side of the crossing, a little right of center.  There appears to be a freight house and more team track area next to the trolley line bridge in the background, and that tall building is probably the freight office.  It just has that 'B&M look'.

Todd Sullivan
who grew up around the NH and B&M


akerboomk
 

That area is referred to as “Yard 7” in the B&M Somerville/Cambridge yards.

Inbound/outbound LCL and freight house, and (?)apparently where some meat reefers were transloaded.

The elevated structure at right is the MBTA “Green” line – WAY behind it is where the (current day) Museum of Science is located.

 

If you look at a current map, it is North/East of MA Rt 28 (Charles River Dam Rd.) and North/West of the Gilmore Bridge


--
Ken Akerboom


Todd Sullivan
 

The 'reinforcement rail' on concrete is probably one side of a mobile gantry crane setup.  This looks to be at a Boston & Maine team track near Lechmere Square.  The crossing is not unguarded: there are typical B&M crossing gates on all 4 corners of the crossing.  They may be controlled from that shack on the opposite side of the crossing, a little right of center.  There appears to be a freight house and more team track area next to the trolley line bridge in the background, and that tall building is probably the freight office.  It just has that 'B&M look'.

Todd Sullivan
who grew up around the NH and B&M


Richard Townsend
 

That’s a cool little detail for a team track or gantry site. And I like the political billboard in the background as that is an easy way to “vintage date” a scene.


On Jan 12, 2021, at 2:54 PM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi List Members,
 
We sometime see images of large loads on flat cars that are accompanied by signs describing the item and letting the world know who the manufacturer was.
 
Ever wonder what happens to those signs after the car is unloaded?
 
Have a look at the lower right corner of this image...
 
 
The sign appears to say "BETHLEHEM STEEL", and possibly "Fabricated Steel" on the line below.
 
Other nice details to notice are the bumping post, with a pair of re-inforcement rails between the running rails, and the one rail on concrete foundation probably for a movable overhead crane. I don't know the Bostan area railroading scene very well, but there appears to be a substantial freight house and/or team tracks in the background
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
We sometime see images of large loads on flat cars that are accompanied by signs describing the item and letting the world know who the manufacturer was.
 
Ever wonder what happens to those signs after the car is unloaded?
 
Have a look at the lower right corner of this image...
 
 
The sign appears to say "BETHLEHEM STEEL", and possibly "Fabricated Steel" on the line below.
 
Other nice details to notice are the bumping post, with a pair of re-inforcement rails between the running rails, and the one rail on concrete foundation probably for a movable overhead crane. I don't know the Bostan area railroading scene very well, but there appears to be a substantial freight house and/or team tracks in the background
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund