Heavy duty trucks on B&LE hoppers-Why?


Dennis Storzek
 

I was giving some thought to these trucks, wondering why high capacity cars (85 and 90 tons capacity) of the pre-war period all seemed to use clasp brakes while our modern 100 and 125 ton cars don't, and then it dawned on me... composition brake shoes, which, near as I can tell, were developed in the mid fifties. Prior to that the common brake shoe was cast iron, and there must have been a limit to how much braking force could be developed with eight standard shoes per car, and 70 ton cars must have been pretty much it. Clasp brakes, with two shoes per wheel, double the amount of brake shoe contact are and also equalize the forces on the journal bearings, which probably had a good effect on journal bearing life. Anybody aware of a trade press article on the subject?

Dennis Storzek


Tim O'Connor
 


Ahem. When you've got serious grades, you need serious brakes!

(Athearn makes the roller bearing version of the clasp brake trucks.)


On 2/18/2021 11:00 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
I was giving some thought to these trucks, wondering why high capacity cars (85 and 90 tons capacity) of the pre-war period all seemed to use clasp brakes while our modern 100 and 125 ton cars don't, and then it dawned on me... composition brake shoes, which, near as I can tell, were developed in the mid fifties. Prior to that the common brake shoe was cast iron, and there must have been a limit to how much braking force could be developed with eight standard shoes per car, and 70 ton cars must have been pretty much it. Clasp brakes, with two shoes per wheel, double the amount of brake shoe contact are and also equalize the forces on the journal bearings, which probably had a good effect on journal bearing life. Anybody aware of a trade press article on the subject?

Dennis Storzek

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Jeff Ford
 

Dennis,

Helium tank cars are another example.  They tip the scales at 100 tons, empty.  Not only did the early cars have clasp brake rigging, they had two complete air brakes systems - one for each truck.

That's a lot of braking effort for a net payload of 3000 pounds of Helium.  All the weight came from the 30 welded steel tanks that held the gas. 

$.02,
-Jeff Ford
Sanger, TX


Mont Switzer
 

However, after loading the helium cars became lighter and therefore less need for the clasp brakes. 

 

One professional railroader told me they had a helium car on the PRR that was overloaded and it actually started to float above the rails.  They had to open a valve to bleed some of the helium off to get it back down on the rails.

 

Or was it on the SP?

 

Mont

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jeff Ford
Sent: Friday, February 19, 2021 7:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Heavy duty trucks on B&LE hoppers-Why?

 

Dennis,

Helium tank cars are another example.  They tip the scales at 100 tons, empty.  Not only did the early cars have clasp brake rigging, they had two complete air brakes systems - one for each truck.

That's a lot of braking effort for a net payload of 3000 pounds of Helium.  All the weight came from the 30 welded steel tanks that held the gas. 

$.02,
-Jeff Ford
Sanger, TX


Tony Thompson
 

Oh, I wish you hadn’t done this, Mont. I am so tired of the associated foolishness that the humor is long gone.
Tony Thompson 


On Feb 20, 2021, at 5:54 AM, Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...> wrote:



However, after loading the helium cars became lighter and therefore less need for the clasp brakes. 

 

One professional railroader told me they had a helium car on the PRR that was overloaded and it actually started to float above the rails.  They had to open a valve to bleed some of the helium off to get it back down on the rails.

 

Or was it on the SP?

 

Mont

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jeff Ford
Sent: Friday, February 19, 2021 7:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Heavy duty trucks on B&LE hoppers-Why?

 

Dennis,

Helium tank cars are another example.  They tip the scales at 100 tons, empty.  Not only did the early cars have clasp brake rigging, they had two complete air brakes systems - one for each truck.

That's a lot of braking effort for a net payload of 3000 pounds of Helium.  All the weight came from the 30 welded steel tanks that held the gas. 

$.02,
-Jeff Ford
Sanger, TX


Brian Carlson
 

Mont, In 50 years someone is going to find your message and think you’re speaking fact. Lol.

We have a hard enough time convincing folks N&W hoppers went over Sherman Hill. Now this. Oi!

Brian J. Carlson


Mont Switzer
 

Brian and all,

I'm getting a pretty good scolding on this one so I won’t repeat any more transporter humor. I'll stick to the endless posts all of which are full of useful facts.

Mont

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Carlson via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, February 20, 2021 11:30 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Heavy duty trucks on B&LE hoppers-Why?

Mont, In 50 years someone is going to find your message and think you’re speaking fact. Lol.

We have a hard enough time convincing folks N&W hoppers went over Sherman Hill. Now this. Oi!

Brian J. Carlson


David Payne
 



Maybe it was on the Bessemer Southern ...
 
DPayne