BREX 74893 reefer


ron christensen
 

I found this picture of a Burlington Route ice refrigrator in my files. I thought someone would be interested.
 The stencil reads built 8 37.
Ron Christensen


WILLIAM PARDIE
 

That is a great detail shot of the Ice hatches.  I did not know that there were two pins securing the hatch.  Does anyone have a similar shot of PFE hatches?

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "ron christensen via groups.io" <rxensen@...>
Date: 3/12/21 9:26 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] BREX 74893 reefer

I found this picture of a Burlington Route ice refrigrator in my files. I thought someone would be interested.
 The stencil reads built 8 37.
Ron Christensen


Jack Mullen
 

Great find, Ron. Clear images of roof details are scarce. This one is also the  best I've seen of those fork-tailed-rib ends. Can't remember if we have an official name for 'em.

I think this car will be my Bill Welch project.

And this photo should go into the FGE /"Our Companies" book. BTW, I assume the location is Plattsmouth NE car shops. ? 

Jack Mullen


Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 12:22 PM, Jack Mullen wrote:
Great find, Ron. Clear images of roof details are scarce. This one is also the  best I've seen of those fork-tailed-rib ends. Can't remember if we have an official name for 'em.
Decades ago John Nehrich wanted to call them "bifurcated" ends. But they're really just the standard Dreadnaught pattern as normally seen from the inside.

Dennis Storzek


Tony Thompson
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:

Decades ago John Nehrich wanted to call them "bifurcated" ends. But they're really just the standard Dreadnaught pattern as normally seen from the inside.

      I disagree, Dennis. Look at the ribs with the "indents." They are the major ribs, not the flat parts between the ribs. On normal Dreadnaughst, the flat parts between the major ribs have the "darts" at the ends. Here the "darts" are in the ribs themselves.
        There certainly are cases of really "reversed" Dreadnaught ends, especially visible on gondolas. But I don't think this is one.

Tony Thompson




Jack Mullen
 

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 12:47 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
Decades ago John Nehrich wanted to call them "bifurcated" ends. But they're really just the standard Dreadnaught pattern as normally seen from the inside.
I don't think that's quite true. Yes, it's quite like an indented dreadnaught end, reversed. But I see a difference in shape of the rib.  On the "innie", the indented shapes are narrow toward the centerline and widen at the ends where they contain the minor darts. The space between tapers like, well, a dreadnaught rib. Flip it inside out, and the indentations become ribs that widen at the ends. I think this pattern shows on some gon ends.

In this photo it appears the ribs have parallel edges and constant width. The flat space between ribs is consequently not tapered. Please chime in, folks. If my interpretation is wrong I'd like to know before I screw it up in O scale.

Jack Mullen


Tim O'Connor
 


I distinguish between the two styles by calling one "reverse", and the other "inverse".

I just can't remember which is which. :-D

Tim O'Connor


On 3/12/2021 4:00 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Dennis Storzek wrote:

Decades ago John Nehrich wanted to call them "bifurcated" ends. But they're really just the standard Dreadnaught pattern as normally seen from the inside.

      I disagree, Dennis. Look at the ribs with the "indents." They are the major ribs, not the flat parts between the ribs. On normal Dreadnaughst, the flat parts between the major ribs have the "darts" at the ends. Here the "darts" are in the ribs themselves.
        There certainly are cases of really "reversed" Dreadnaught ends, especially visible on gondolas. But I don't think this is one.

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Philip Dove
 

Perhaps it was just a real life foobie, A careless builder who couldn't be bothered to get a proper end, Those end decals look a bit large.

Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Sat, 13 Mar 2021 at 16:37, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

I distinguish between the two styles by calling one "reverse", and the other "inverse".

I just can't remember which is which. :-D

Tim O'Connor


On 3/12/2021 4:00 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Dennis Storzek wrote:

Decades ago John Nehrich wanted to call them "bifurcated" ends. But they're really just the standard Dreadnaught pattern as normally seen from the inside.

      I disagree, Dennis. Look at the ribs with the "indents." They are the major ribs, not the flat parts between the ribs. On normal Dreadnaughst, the flat parts between the major ribs have the "darts" at the ends. Here the "darts" are in the ribs themselves.
        There certainly are cases of really "reversed" Dreadnaught ends, especially visible on gondolas. But I don't think this is one.

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Jack Mullen
 

On Sat, Mar 13, 2021 at 08:37 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
I distinguish between the two styles by calling one "reverse", and the other "inverse".

I just can't remember which is which. :-D
Which is exactly why I used "indented" (aka "innie") and "reversed" in my previous post.   ;^)

Jack Mullen


Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 01:01 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
      I disagree, Dennis. Look at the ribs with the "indents." They are the major ribs, not the flat parts between the ribs. On normal Dreadnaughst, the flat parts between the major ribs have the "darts" at the ends. Here the "darts" are in the ribs themselves.
Well Tony, we can agree to disagree. What is "rib" and what is the space between the ribs chances as you move the neutral axis of the end sheet from one face of the pressing pattern to the other, but the details of the pressings remain the same. I believe the dart was described in the patents on the Dreadnaught end Jack Mullin found and we discussed several years ago, so it's just another variation of the Dreadnaught end. The problem with making up names is they become part of our lexicon, and don't go away when the proper name comes to light... As in roofwalk / running board, stirrup step / sill step.

Dennis Storzek


Tony Thompson
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:

Well Tony, we can agree to disagree.

Sure, and I don't want to wrangle nomenclature here. But I do think physical appearance matters. 

What is "rib" and what is the space between the ribs chances as you move the neutral axis of the end sheet from one face of the pressing pattern to the other, but the details of the pressings remain the same. 

I believe you CAN distinguish a rib from the flat parts. The ribs have convex shape (from outside) and taper toward the car sides. The flat parts are just flat, side to side. If looked at from the other side, the flat parts would not look like ribs, they would still be flat parts, though uppermost from the pressed-in ribs (from that side).

Tony Thompson




Ted Culotta
 

Late to the party, but this a "Buckeye Bifurcated steel end" NOT a reverse type of Dreadnaught. Have 3D masters sitting here for a BREX model. Please don't ask when I will have them read for sale... still unpacking from my move. Love the photo, though. Thanks for sharing Ron!

Cheers,