Vallejo paint


Clark Propst
 

I know a lot of guys like the Vallejo brand paint. I bought my first vial, tube, whatever they’re called of Vallejo paint at Hobby Lobby alone with a thingy of thinner. I attached the cup to my trusty old Paasche H and dribbled in some paint, then dribbled in some thinner and stirred, not shaken. The stuff came out onto my test piece is blobs, not well mixed. It did dry fairly smooth.
Questions: How should I’ve mixed the stuff? What do you do with the leftovers?

Luckily I didn't like the color for my project, so I don't have to mess with the stuff...till next time....
 Clark Propst


Dennis Korn
 

Clark,

If you are using Vallejo Air (designed for airbrushing) then I would recommend the following:

1. Put a stainless steel nut (make sure of quality because some stainless with rust) into the bottle to help shake up the contents.
2. Put some paint into your color cup (you should really mix it in a separate shot glass, but most of us don't bother) and add some Vallejo Airbrush Flow Improver (this is a type of retarder specifically for Vallejo).
3. Then play around on a plastic sheet with air pressure until you get the right pattern.

Note: I have a separate airbrush for Acrylics and Lacquers. If you get any lacquer thinner mixed into the Vallejo (even left over around the needle) it will turn to a gel and screw up paint flow with bad results.

Take care,

Dennis Korn

On Thursday, March 25, 2021, 11:07:00 AM EDT, Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:


I know a lot of guys like the Vallejo brand paint. I bought my first vial, tube, whatever they’re called of Vallejo paint at Hobby Lobby alone with a thingy of thinner. I attached the cup to my trusty old Paasche H and dribbled in some paint, then dribbled in some thinner and stirred, not shaken. The stuff came out onto my test piece is blobs, not well mixed. It did dry fairly smooth.
Questions: How should I’ve mixed the stuff? What do you do with the leftovers?

Luckily I didn't like the color for my project, so I don't have to mess with the stuff...till next time....
 Clark Propst


Douglas Harding
 

Clark, Vallejo makes two versions of their acrylic paint. One called Model Color is for brush-on application. The other is called Model Air and is thinned for airbrushing. According to their website they are formulated differently.

 

I have only found Model Color in individual bottles at Hobby Lobby. I really liked how it flowed and covered using a brush, but it is way too thick for airbrushing. The last time I checked Hobby Lobby did have Model Air, but only in a package of 8 colors for airplanes, which I did not want. I believe the thinner is design for use with Model Air.

 

I suspect you got a bottle of Model Color for brush-on application.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Clark Propst
Sent: Thursday, March 25, 2021 10:07 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Vallejo paint

 

I know a lot of guys like the Vallejo brand paint. I bought my first vial, tube, whatever they’re called of Vallejo paint at Hobby Lobby alone with a thingy of thinner. I attached the cup to my trusty old Paasche H and dribbled in some paint, then dribbled in some thinner and stirred, not shaken. The stuff came out onto my test piece is blobs, not well mixed. It did dry fairly smooth.

Questions: How should I’ve mixed the stuff? What do you do with the leftovers?

Luckily I didn't like the color for my project, so I don't have to mess with the stuff...till next time....

 Clark Propst


Dave Parker
 

In my experience, the Model Color works just fine when appropriately thinned (and mixed).  I do use the Flow Improver, but I can't swear that it makes a big difference.  As per the late Bill Welch, you want a big needle for acrylics (0.5 mm or larger), and a modest air pressure of 20 psi or less.

The Model Air paints are ready to spray out of the bottle, but I still add a few drops of the Improver.

I like and use the Vallejo paints quite a bit, but feel that they are a tad short of the mark when it comes to replicating Pollyscale.  YMMV of course.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Lester Breuer
 

Clark never mix in the paint cup as paint goes around needle and that does not mix well with paint and thinner added above.  Always mix in another container - I use a large measuring spoon.  There are two Vallejo paint  types: Model Air ready for spraying which I find rare ( I have spayed only a few times with paint directly from the bottle) and Model Color for brushing that always must be thinned.  Before any thinning I remove eye dropper bottle top which does come out of bottle and stir paint inside bottle and reinsert eyedropper top.   thinning:  I mix all paint for the airbrush in a large measuring spoon.  Normally 30 to 40 drops of paint.  The beauty of the eye drop top.  Thinner: Model Air due to bottle sitting on shelf for a period of time may need to be thinned when opened so start with maybe 10 drops of thinner and work up 5 drops at a time. You should have a milk viscosity for spraying.  I use a piece of rail to stir the paint and thinner in the measuring spoon.  If I turn the rail after stirring vertical and the paint on the rail forms a drop and drips off paint is ready.  For Model Color I start with the same number of 30 to 40 drops of paint.  I start with half the number of drops, 15 or 20 of thinner and work up - again five drops at a time.  Again, when drop falls off rail used for mixing thinned paint ready for spraying.  On Model Color at times I will need and work up to the same amount of drops, 30 to 40 to get viscosity of thinner and paint correct.  Sounds like a lot of tedious time spent mixing; however, soon second nature and you will be able to mix at light speed as you building speed.

And, one key to Vallejo paint and thinner spray mix is needle size and air pressure.  The larger the needle size the better and air pressure 24 lbs or lower.  BTW when I started with water base paint I started with the Paasche H.   Now Passache Talon with #3 needle or Badger Patriot which has only one needle size.

Lester Breuer


Nelson Moyer
 

Good advice from an avid Vallejo user. However, I will occasionally mix paint with thinner in the cup for small paint jobs, but only with lacquers or enamels, never acrylics. I put the thinner into the cup first, so I know exactly how much I have, then add the paint to achieve approximately 3 parts paint and one part thinner. I use the tip of the plastic disposable pipette to stir and mix by aspiration a few times. Works just fine.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lester Breuer
Sent: Thursday, March 25, 2021 4:55 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Vallejo paint

 

Clark never mix in the paint cup as paint goes around needle and that does not mix well with paint and thinner added above.  Always mix in another container - I use a large measuring spoon.  There are two Vallejo paint  types: Model Air ready for spraying which I find rare ( I have spayed only a few times with paint directly from the bottle) and Model Color for brushing that always must be thinned.  Before any thinning I remove eye dropper bottle top which does come out of bottle and stir paint inside bottle and reinsert eyedropper top.   thinning:  I mix all paint for the airbrush in a large measuring spoon.  Normally 30 to 40 drops of paint.  The beauty of the eye drop top.  Thinner: Model Air due to bottle sitting on shelf for a period of time may need to be thinned when opened so start with maybe 10 drops of thinner and work up 5 drops at a time. You should have a milk viscosity for spraying.  I use a piece of rail to stir the paint and thinner in the measuring spoon.  If I turn the rail after stirring vertical and the paint on the rail forms a drop and drips off paint is ready.  For Model Color I start with the same number of 30 to 40 drops of paint.  I start with half the number of drops, 15 or 20 of thinner and work up - again five drops at a time.  Again, when drop falls off rail used for mixing thinned paint ready for spraying.  On Model Color at times I will need and work up to the same amount of drops, 30 to 40 to get viscosity of thinner and paint correct.  Sounds like a lot of tedious time spent mixing; however, soon second nature and you will be able to mix at light speed as you building speed.

And, one key to Vallejo paint and thinner spray mix is needle size and air pressure.  The larger the needle size the better and air pressure 24 lbs or lower.  BTW when I started with water base paint I started with the Paasche H.   Now Passache Talon with #3 needle or Badger Patriot which has only one needle size.

Lester Breuer


WILLIAM PARDIE
 

A while back there was a modeling article on the 10 best tools for modeling.  One of the ten was the small battery operated mixer from Microsoft Mark.
Right they were.  It is one of my most used tools..I keep several at the ready.

Incidents another forgotten item for mixing paint is an ultrasonic cleaner.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...>
Date: 3/25/21 12:59 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Vallejo paint

Good advice from an avid Vallejo user. However, I will occasionally mix paint with thinner in the cup for small paint jobs, but only with lacquers or enamels, never acrylics. I put the thinner into the cup first, so I know exactly how much I have, then add the paint to achieve approximately 3 parts paint and one part thinner. I use the tip of the plastic disposable pipette to stir and mix by aspiration a few times. Works just fine.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lester Breuer
Sent: Thursday, March 25, 2021 4:55 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Vallejo paint

 

Clark never mix in the paint cup as paint goes around needle and that does not mix well with paint and thinner added above.  Always mix in another container - I use a large measuring spoon.  There are two Vallejo paint  types: Model Air ready for spraying which I find rare ( I have spayed only a few times with paint directly from the bottle) and Model Color for brushing that always must be thinned.  Before any thinning I remove eye dropper bottle top which does come out of bottle and stir paint inside bottle and reinsert eyedropper top.   thinning:  I mix all paint for the airbrush in a large measuring spoon.  Normally 30 to 40 drops of paint.  The beauty of the eye drop top.  Thinner: Model Air due to bottle sitting on shelf for a period of time may need to be thinned when opened so start with maybe 10 drops of thinner and work up 5 drops at a time. You should have a milk viscosity for spraying.  I use a piece of rail to stir the paint and thinner in the measuring spoon.  If I turn the rail after stirring vertical and the paint on the rail forms a drop and drips off paint is ready.  For Model Color I start with the same number of 30 to 40 drops of paint.  I start with half the number of drops, 15 or 20 of thinner and work up - again five drops at a time.  Again, when drop falls off rail used for mixing thinned paint ready for spraying.  On Model Color at times I will need and work up to the same amount of drops, 30 to 40 to get viscosity of thinner and paint correct.  Sounds like a lot of tedious time spent mixing; however, soon second nature and you will be able to mix at light speed as you building speed.

And, one key to Vallejo paint and thinner spray mix is needle size and air pressure.  The larger the needle size the better and air pressure 24 lbs or lower.  BTW when I started with water base paint I started with the Paasche H.   Now Passache Talon with #3 needle or Badger Patriot which has only one needle size.

Lester Breuer


Robert kirkham
 

I’ll add a couple of minor thoughts: 
- Vallejo says it can be mixed by rolling the bottle back and forth between the palms for at least 60 seconds.  I find this quick and easy. 
- I usually put the paint into a small bottle or dish, add a bit of air brush thinner.  Doing it this way, you can see if a bottle has gone bad (rare) before it goes in the airbrush cup.
- I pour into the cup, do a test pattern, and spray at about 15 pounds of pressure (a tip from the internet).  
- I have a 3 gallon bucket of water with dish soap standing buy.  If I mess up, the model goes into the water immediately.  I also use the bucket to clean the airbrush.
- I spray more air brush cleaner through to do a final clean up.  If it is stubborn, a bit of alcohol in the cup and sprayed through will clean it up.  Isopropyl is not good for the gaskets in the airbrush, etc, but I use it in a pinch.  I’ll occasionally disassemble and use isopropyl to clean parts that have dried on paint.   

For brush painting, wow, is this stuff forgiving.  I dip the paint brush in airbrush thinner to moisten (not soak) it a bit before painting.  Makes clean up easier later on.  I usually mix a few drops on a bit of plastic or tin foil, and brush it on the model.  A small puddle goes a long way.  Running out has never been a problem; just mix some more and brush it on.  The overlap?  Well, it's invisible to my eye.  So easy makes me wonder why I bother with the airbrush.  But the airbrush gives a thinner coat.

Down side: it turns to stretchy rubber if you apply a wash thinned with turpentine.  That was a bad day!

Rob

On Mar 25, 2021, at 2:54 PM, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

Clark never mix in the paint cup as paint goes around needle and that does not mix well with paint and thinner added above.  Always mix in another container - I use a large measuring spoon.  There are two Vallejo paint  types: Model Air ready for spraying which I find rare ( I have spayed only a few times with paint directly from the bottle) and Model Color for brushing that always must be thinned.  Before any thinning I remove eye dropper bottle top which does come out of bottle and stir paint inside bottle and reinsert eyedropper top.   thinning:  I mix all paint for the airbrush in a large measuring spoon.  Normally 30 to 40 drops of paint.  The beauty of the eye drop top.  Thinner: Model Air due to bottle sitting on shelf for a period of time may need to be thinned when opened so start with maybe 10 drops of thinner and work up 5 drops at a time. You should have a milk viscosity for spraying.  I use a piece of rail to stir the paint and thinner in the measuring spoon.  If I turn the rail after stirring vertical and the paint on the rail forms a drop and drips off paint is ready.  For Model Color I start with the same number of 30 to 40 drops of paint.  I start with half the number of drops, 15 or 20 of thinner and work up - again five drops at a time.  Again, when drop falls off rail used for mixing thinned paint ready for spraying.  On Model Color at times I will need and work up to the same amount of drops, 30 to 40 to get viscosity of thinner and paint correct.  Sounds like a lot of tedious time spent mixing; however, soon second nature and you will be able to mix at light speed as you building speed.

And, one key to Vallejo paint and thinner spray mix is needle size and air pressure.  The larger the needle size the better and air pressure 24 lbs or lower.  BTW when I started with water base paint I started with the Paasche H.   Now Passache Talon with #3 needle or Badger Patriot which has only one needle size.

Lester Breuer


Schuyler Larrabee
 

OK, I have to say that a paint that requires as many posts as Vallejo seems to just strengthens my opinion that anything other than Scalecoat, either 1 or 2, is a waste of time and a source of aggravation.  “Just sayin,” as Fenton would say.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Vallejo paint

 

I’ll add a couple of minor thoughts: 

- Vallejo says it can be mixed by rolling the bottle back and forth between the palms for at least 60 seconds.  I find this quick and easy. 

- I usually put the paint into a small bottle or dish, add a bit of air brush thinner.  Doing it this way, you can see if a bottle has gone bad (rare) before it goes in the airbrush cup.

- I pour into the cup, do a test pattern, and spray at about 15 pounds of pressure (a tip from the internet).  

- I have a 3 gallon bucket of water with dish soap standing buy.  If I mess up, the model goes into the water immediately.  I also use the bucket to clean the airbrush.

- I spray more air brush cleaner through to do a final clean up.  If it is stubborn, a bit of alcohol in the cup and sprayed through will clean it up.  Isopropyl is not good for the gaskets in the airbrush, etc, but I use it in a pinch.  I’ll occasionally disassemble and use isopropyl to clean parts that have dried on paint.   

 

For brush painting, wow, is this stuff forgiving.  I dip the paint brush in airbrush thinner to moisten (not soak) it a bit before painting.  Makes clean up easier later on.  I usually mix a few drops on a bit of plastic or tin foil, and brush it on the model.  A small puddle goes a long way.  Running out has never been a problem; just mix some more and brush it on.  The overlap?  Well, it's invisible to my eye.  So easy makes me wonder why I bother with the airbrush.  But the airbrush gives a thinner coat.

 

Down side: it turns to stretchy rubber if you apply a wash thinned with turpentine.  That was a bad day!

 

Rob

 

On Mar 25, 2021, at 2:54 PM, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

 

Clark never mix in the paint cup as paint goes around needle and that does not mix well with paint and thinner added above.  Always mix in another container - I use a large measuring spoon.  There are two Vallejo paint  types: Model Air ready for spraying which I find rare ( I have spayed only a few times with paint directly from the bottle) and Model Color for brushing that always must be thinned.  Before any thinning I remove eye dropper bottle top which does come out of bottle and stir paint inside bottle and reinsert eyedropper top.   thinning:  I mix all paint for the airbrush in a large measuring spoon.  Normally 30 to 40 drops of paint.  The beauty of the eye drop top.  Thinner: Model Air due to bottle sitting on shelf for a period of time may need to be thinned when opened so start with maybe 10 drops of thinner and work up 5 drops at a time. You should have a milk viscosity for spraying.  I use a piece of rail to stir the paint and thinner in the measuring spoon.  If I turn the rail after stirring vertical and the paint on the rail forms a drop and drips off paint is ready.  For Model Color I start with the same number of 30 to 40 drops of paint.  I start with half the number of drops, 15 or 20 of thinner and work up - again five drops at a time.  Again, when drop falls off rail used for mixing thinned paint ready for spraying.  On Model Color at times I will need and work up to the same amount of drops, 30 to 40 to get viscosity of thinner and paint correct.  Sounds like a lot of tedious time spent mixing; however, soon second nature and you will be able to mix at light speed as you building speed.

And, one key to Vallejo paint and thinner spray mix is needle size and air pressure.  The larger the needle size the better and air pressure 24 lbs or lower.  BTW when I started with water base paint I started with the Paasche H.   Now Passache Talon with #3 needle or Badger Patriot which has only one needle size.

Lester Breuer

 


O Fenton Wells
 

After reading all this I’m in agreement with you Schuyler 
Fenton 


On Mar 26, 2021, at 3:16 PM, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:



OK, I have to say that a paint that requires as many posts as Vallejo seems to just strengthens my opinion that anything other than Scalecoat, either 1 or 2, is a waste of time and a source of aggravation.  “Just sayin,” as Fenton would say.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Vallejo paint

 

I’ll add a couple of minor thoughts: 

- Vallejo says it can be mixed by rolling the bottle back and forth between the palms for at least 60 seconds.  I find this quick and easy. 

- I usually put the paint into a small bottle or dish, add a bit of air brush thinner.  Doing it this way, you can see if a bottle has gone bad (rare) before it goes in the airbrush cup.

- I pour into the cup, do a test pattern, and spray at about 15 pounds of pressure (a tip from the internet).  

- I have a 3 gallon bucket of water with dish soap standing buy.  If I mess up, the model goes into the water immediately.  I also use the bucket to clean the airbrush.

- I spray more air brush cleaner through to do a final clean up.  If it is stubborn, a bit of alcohol in the cup and sprayed through will clean it up.  Isopropyl is not good for the gaskets in the airbrush, etc, but I use it in a pinch.  I’ll occasionally disassemble and use isopropyl to clean parts that have dried on paint.   

 

For brush painting, wow, is this stuff forgiving.  I dip the paint brush in airbrush thinner to moisten (not soak) it a bit before painting.  Makes clean up easier later on.  I usually mix a few drops on a bit of plastic or tin foil, and brush it on the model.  A small puddle goes a long way.  Running out has never been a problem; just mix some more and brush it on.  The overlap?  Well, it's invisible to my eye.  So easy makes me wonder why I bother with the airbrush.  But the airbrush gives a thinner coat.

 

Down side: it turns to stretchy rubber if you apply a wash thinned with turpentine.  That was a bad day!

 

Rob

 

On Mar 25, 2021, at 2:54 PM, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

 

Clark never mix in the paint cup as paint goes around needle and that does not mix well with paint and thinner added above.  Always mix in another container - I use a large measuring spoon.  There are two Vallejo paint  types: Model Air ready for spraying which I find rare ( I have spayed only a few times with paint directly from the bottle) and Model Color for brushing that always must be thinned.  Before any thinning I remove eye dropper bottle top which does come out of bottle and stir paint inside bottle and reinsert eyedropper top.   thinning:  I mix all paint for the airbrush in a large measuring spoon.  Normally 30 to 40 drops of paint.  The beauty of the eye drop top.  Thinner: Model Air due to bottle sitting on shelf for a period of time may need to be thinned when opened so start with maybe 10 drops of thinner and work up 5 drops at a time. You should have a milk viscosity for spraying.  I use a piece of rail to stir the paint and thinner in the measuring spoon.  If I turn the rail after stirring vertical and the paint on the rail forms a drop and drips off paint is ready.  For Model Color I start with the same number of 30 to 40 drops of paint.  I start with half the number of drops, 15 or 20 of thinner and work up - again five drops at a time.  Again, when drop falls off rail used for mixing thinned paint ready for spraying.  On Model Color at times I will need and work up to the same amount of drops, 30 to 40 to get viscosity of thinner and paint correct.  Sounds like a lot of tedious time spent mixing; however, soon second nature and you will be able to mix at light speed as you building speed.

And, one key to Vallejo paint and thinner spray mix is needle size and air pressure.  The larger the needle size the better and air pressure 24 lbs or lower.  BTW when I started with water base paint I started with the Paasche H.   Now Passache Talon with #3 needle or Badger Patriot which has only one needle size.

Lester Breuer

 


Bill McClure
 

Really. I have been doing this for more than 60 years with every available paint, and have found that nothing weathers models as nicely as Vallejo.

I also use both SC paints and have found that putting SC thinner in a cup with paint is no bother or aggravation.

If you're happy with what you use, keep on keepin' on. 

Bill


Bruce Griffin
 

Dennis,

As an alternative to a stainless steel nut as an agitator I am using this product available on Amazon (below). Another idea from military molders. I also bought some small 20 mL dropper bottles from Amazon to pre-thin Vallejo Model Color paints and have them ready for airbrushing. I am working on several SP cars and using thinned 70.814 burnt red for paint 

 

The Army Painter Paint Mixing Balls - Rust-proof Stainless Steel Balls for Mixing Model Paints - Stainless Steel Mixing Agitator Balls, 5.5mm/apr. 0.22”, 100 Pcs

 

Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD
https://bomodeling.com/blog/

 


Tim O'Connor
 


A good suggestion! Just FYI AK-Interactive sells bottles of 250 balls for the same price.

Tim O'Connor


On 3/27/2021 2:05 AM, Bruce Griffin wrote:

Dennis,

As an alternative to a stainless steel nut as an agitator I am using this product available on Amazon (below). Another idea from military molders. I also bought some small 20 mL dropper bottles from Amazon to pre-thin Vallejo Model Color paints and have them ready for airbrushing. I am working on several SP cars and using thinned 70.814 burnt red for paint 

The Army Painter Paint Mixing Balls - Rust-proof Stainless Steel Balls for Mixing Model Paints - Stainless Steel Mixing Agitator Balls, 5.5mm/apr. 0.22”, 100 Pcs

Bruce D. Griffin



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Ken Adams
 

Aha...someone else has discovered the Vallejo 70.814 as an excellent SP Freight car red. I don't airbrush (I used to, but for many reasons gave up the habit) but have found that using the Tamiya Oxide primer and then a wash of the burnt red is an excellent substitute for PBL Star Brand  SP-UP FCR.  
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io