Pinned together


Dave Nelson
 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/37711713434/in/album-72157649155982802/

 

On Flicker, a Magnolia tankcar from 1919.  It looks like it has been pinned together.  I don’t recall seeing this before.  And the dimensions remind me of something Chicago Tankcar would build, not AC&F.

 

Comments?

 

Dave Nelson


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Pinned?  As opposed to riveted?  Not sure what you are saying here.

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 3:35 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Pinned together

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/37711713434/in/album-72157649155982802/

 

On Flicker, a Magnolia tankcar from 1919.  It looks like it has been pinned together.  I don’t recall seeing this before.  And the dimensions remind me of something Chicago Tankcar would build, not AC&F.

 

Comments?

 

Dave Nelson


akerboomk
 

Are you talking about the horizontal "lines" just be low the car numbers, extending the length of the car?
Looks to me like an insulated tank, and the 2 pieces of jacket have angle irons attached, with bolts between them to draw the jacket tight?
--
Ken Akerboom


Tony Thompson
 

Ken Akerboom wrote:

Are you talking about the horizontal "lines" just be low the car numbers, extending the length of the car?
Looks to me like an insulated tank, and the 2 pieces of jacket have angle irons attached, with bolts between them to draw the jacket tight?

Ken is exactly right. And these details are almost certainly a buyer specification, not a builder standard.

Tony Thompson




Dave Parker
 

I think what is "unusual" about this car is that it is about the earliest example of an AC&F insulated car that I have seen.  In my collection, most/all of the TMI cars from AC&F start appearing in the mid-1920s and, by then, they had rather "smooth" jackets covering the insulating layer.  This car just reflects early days in their construction of TMI cars.  Otherwise it is -- I'm never quite sure what to call it -- just an ACF Type 17 or maybe 19, i.e., the old Type 11 frame with an MCB class III tank on top.

BTW, the KD brakes were standard on AC&F cars built from ca. 1919 to 1921.  And, no, this was not a buyer's specification, this is how AC&F built all of their tank cars during this period.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Chris Barkan
 

Note that this car, as well as the next in the series shown at the Barriger site, COSX 3000, were ICC Type IV cars (one can see this in the stenciling on the tank head).
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL


Dave Nelson
 

Yes… I was referring to those bolts.  I’ve never seen anything like that before.  Made me think of belaying pins.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of akerboomk
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 1:39 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Pinned together

 

Are you talking about the horizontal "lines" just be low the car numbers, extending the length of the car?
Looks to me like an insulated tank, and the 2 pieces of jacket have angle irons attached, with bolts between them to draw the jacket tight?
--
Ken Akerboom


Tony Thompson
 

Dave Nelson wrote:

Yes… I was referring to those bolts.  I’ve never seen anything like that before.  

In later years, those bolts were just shorter, and pulled the two halves of the jacket together.

Tony Thompson




Steve and Barb Hile
 

Lot 8666 was for 20 cars, 10000 gallon capacity ordered in March 1919.  The car is Class IV and could be used for natural (casinghead) gasoline service.  Note the two globe valves atop the dome hatch cover (which may not even be round.)  But it also has a bottom outlet valve below the center sill.  General American seems to have been an early proponent of Class IV cars and, as Dave says, this may be one of the earliest versions for them.

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Parker via groups.io
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 5:04 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Pinned together

 

I think what is "unusual" about this car is that it is about the earliest example of an AC&F insulated car that I have seen.  In my collection, most/all of the TMI cars from AC&F start appearing in the mid-1920s and, by then, they had rather "smooth" jackets covering the insulating layer.  This car just reflects early days in their construction of TMI cars.  Otherwise it is -- I'm never quite sure what to call it -- just an ACF Type 17 or maybe 19, i.e., the old Type 11 frame with an MCB class III tank on top.

BTW, the KD brakes were standard on AC&F cars built from ca. 1919 to 1921.  And, no, this was not a buyer's specification, this is how AC&F built all of their tank cars during this period.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA