A few period boxcar roofs 1948 St Louis


Charlie Duckworth
 

Here’s some boxcar roofs that were in some slides of passenger trains shots taken at SLUS.  A few ideas for weathering of the various roofs and the wood running boards.  


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


O Fenton Wells
 

Great photos Charlie, thanks for sharing
Fenton

On Sat, Aug 21, 2021 at 9:09 AM Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:

Here’s some boxcar roofs that were in some slides of passenger trains shots taken at SLUS.  A few ideas for weathering of the various roofs and the wood running boards.  


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Paul Doggett
 

Charlie 

Those are excellent photos thanks for sharing.
Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 21 Aug 2021, at 14:09, Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:



Here’s some boxcar roofs that were in some slides of passenger trains shots taken at SLUS.  A few ideas for weathering of the various roofs and the wood running boards.  


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.

Attachments:


Nelson Moyer
 

These photos are a treasure trove of freight car roofs. Besides the color variations and types of paint failure, many boards in running boards are warped, giving the running board a wavy appearance. We modelers try to apply running boards perfectly straight, so maybe we need to rethink that approach.

 

Nelson Moyer

 


Eric Hansmann
 

Many thanks for sharing these, Charlie!

I am frequently asked why my roof walks are different colors. I share a few links to the Jack Delano images on the LoC site, but that isn't always convincing. These will reinforce the message and also illustrate the variety of metal roof weathering.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN



On 08/21/2021 7:09 AM Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:


Here’s some boxcar roofs that were in some slides of passenger trains shots taken at SLUS.  A few ideas for weathering of the various roofs and the wood running boards.  


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.




Jim Betz
 

Charlie,
  Thanks for posting these pictures.  Someone else has already mentioned "the
roof walks and their condition" ... I will add to that the prediction that if I or anyone
on this list were to "do up a collection of box cars that had the look of the
pictures you posted" ... that our fellow modelers would be highly likely to 
comment that "your cars look great - but I think you have overdone it a bit on
the roofwalks and amount of weathering for the yard as a whole".  They would
be telling us that we need to dial back the roofs - and they'd be wrong.  Not
"totally wrong/off base" - they are giving their honest opinion - but the evidence
that it was like these pictures show is often "over looked". 
  Perhaps we just don't have enough color pictures of freight car roofs ... ?

                                                              Thanks again for the great post ... Jim

P.S. Now to figure out how to add some of this stuff to my personal freight car
       fleet!
 


Charlie Duckworth
 

A couple things stood out; the different colors of aged wood boards on the car next to the PRR round roof X31 and the way the X31 roof had weathered. Plus the gray color of where the paint has come off on the galvanized roof.  I’ve put a slight wave in the roof on the A-50-4 I’m finishing up - off to the paint booth shortly  
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Brian Shumaker
 

Jim,
Yes, the cars were filthy little things in the steam era, but let’s not stop there. Just about everything in the immediate vicinity of a rail yard would be covered in soot. Also, look at the ground, bits of trash and debris scattered all over, again, seldom seen on layouts. Railroading was and is a grimy business. I pay attention to color, and it’s amazing that everything from the spikes to the top of the sides of cars has a “rail brown” coating. You should see my clothes after a day of climbing around cars just putting a train together!

Brian


Eric Hansmann
 

I had a private request for the Library of Congress links to the Jack Delano photos. Here are three that have influenced my model weathering.

When you download, choose the largest TIF file. I makes it easier to zoom in on the details.

RIP track area with gondola interiors. This was used on the cover of a Prototype Railroad Modeling volume.
https://www.loc.gov/item/2017878043/

Boxcars lined up at the Galewood freight house.

More boxcars at the Galewood freight house. This is one of my all time favorite weathering reference photos.

Don't be afraid to pull one of these into an image editor to lighten the levels. A little Photoshoppery brings out a few things you missed.

These Delano photos and the images Charlie shared are great freight car weathering inspiration.

Enjoy!


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN





On 08/21/2021 10:09 AM Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:


Charlie,
  Thanks for posting these pictures.  Someone else has already mentioned "the
roof walks and their condition" ... I will add to that the prediction that if I or anyone
on this list were to "do up a collection of box cars that had the look of the
pictures you posted" ... that our fellow modelers would be highly likely to 
comment that "your cars look great - but I think you have overdone it a bit on
the roofwalks and amount of weathering for the yard as a whole".  They would
be telling us that we need to dial back the roofs - and they'd be wrong.  Not
"totally wrong/off base" - they are giving their honest opinion - but the evidence
that it was like these pictures show is often "over looked". 
  Perhaps we just don't have enough color pictures of freight car roofs ... ?

                                                              Thanks again for the great post ... Jim

P.S. Now to figure out how to add some of this stuff to my personal freight car
       fleet!
 



Eric Hansmann
 

Charlie,

That looks very cool!

I also noticed a newer looking handbrake wheel in one of your images. It was on the end of a PRR X31 boxcar. It definitely has a different shade than the rest of the car end.



Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On 08/21/2021 10:13 AM Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:


A couple things stood out; the different colors of aged wood boards on the car next to the PRR round roof X31 and the way the X31 roof had weathered. Plus the gray color of where the paint has come off on the galvanized roof.  I’ve put a slight wave in the roof on the A-50-4 I’m finishing up - off to the paint booth shortly  
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.



Tony Thompson
 

... that our fellow modelers would be highly likely to
comment that "your cars look great - but I think you have overdone it a bit on
the roofwalks and amount of weathering for the yard as a whole”.'
Some of our fellow modelers might even comment on the state of our running boards. <g>

Tony Thompson
tony@...


Kenneth Montero
 

In the "gondola" picture, hHas asnyone commented on the open platform coach with so many bars across the windows as to cut out most of the viewing from those windows? Is it a car for transporting prisoners?

Ken Montero

On 08/21/2021 1:30 PM Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:


I had a private request for the Library of Congress links to the Jack Delano photos. Here are three that have influenced my model weathering.

When you download, choose the largest TIF file. I makes it easier to zoom in on the details.

RIP track area with gondola interiors. This was used on the cover of a Prototype Railroad Modeling volume.
https://www.loc.gov/item/2017878043/

Boxcars lined up at the Galewood freight house.

More boxcars at the Galewood freight house. This is one of my all time favorite weathering reference photos.

Don't be afraid to pull one of these into an image editor to lighten the levels. A little Photoshoppery brings out a few things you missed.

These Delano photos and the images Charlie shared are great freight car weathering inspiration.

Enjoy!


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN





On 08/21/2021 10:09 AM Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:


Charlie,
  Thanks for posting these pictures.  Someone else has already mentioned "the
roof walks and their condition" ... I will add to that the prediction that if I or anyone
on this list were to "do up a collection of box cars that had the look of the
pictures you posted" ... that our fellow modelers would be highly likely to 
comment that "your cars look great - but I think you have overdone it a bit on
the roofwalks and amount of weathering for the yard as a whole".  They would
be telling us that we need to dial back the roofs - and they'd be wrong.  Not
"totally wrong/off base" - they are giving their honest opinion - but the evidence
that it was like these pictures show is often "over looked". 
  Perhaps we just don't have enough color pictures of freight car roofs ... ?

                                                              Thanks again for the great post ... Jim

P.S. Now to figure out how to add some of this stuff to my personal freight car
       fleet!
 



 

Looks to be a wood car with boards nailed over the windows. Prison cars wouldn’t be wooden. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Aug 21, 2021, at 1:53 PM, Kenneth Montero <va661midlo@...> wrote:


In the "gondola" picture, hHas asnyone commented on the open platform coach with so many bars across the windows as to cut out most of the viewing from those windows? Is it a car for transporting prisoners?

Ken Montero
On 08/21/2021 1:30 PM Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:


I had a private request for the Library of Congress links to the Jack Delano photos. Here are three that have influenced my model weathering.

When you download, choose the largest TIF file. I makes it easier to zoom in on the details.

RIP track area with gondola interiors. This was used on the cover of a Prototype Railroad Modeling volume.
https://www.loc.gov/item/2017878043/

Boxcars lined up at the Galewood freight house.

More boxcars at the Galewood freight house. This is one of my all time favorite weathering reference photos.

Don't be afraid to pull one of these into an image editor to lighten the levels. A little Photoshoppery brings out a few things you missed.

These Delano photos and the images Charlie shared are great freight car weathering inspiration.

Enjoy!


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN





On 08/21/2021 10:09 AM Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:


Charlie,
  Thanks for posting these pictures.  Someone else has already mentioned "the
roof walks and their condition" ... I will add to that the prediction that if I or anyone
on this list were to "do up a collection of box cars that had the look of the
pictures you posted" ... that our fellow modelers would be highly likely to 
comment that "your cars look great - but I think you have overdone it a bit on
the roofwalks and amount of weathering for the yard as a whole".  They would
be telling us that we need to dial back the roofs - and they'd be wrong.  Not
"totally wrong/off base" - they are giving their honest opinion - but the evidence
that it was like these pictures show is often "over looked". 
  Perhaps we just don't have enough color pictures of freight car roofs ... ?

                                                              Thanks again for the great post ... Jim

P.S. Now to figure out how to add some of this stuff to my personal freight car
       fleet!
 



Jack Mullen
 

On Sat, Aug 21, 2021 at 11:53 AM, Kenneth Montero wrote:
Is it a car for transporting prisoners?
No, just an old wooden coach that had migrated into non-revenue service.  Boarded up either to protect windows from being broken or because they already have been.  The war years saw a lot of old equipment that had been stored during the depression pulled back into service.

Fwiw, it appears that the near end is jacked up for wheel change or other truck repair.

Jack Mullen


Charlie Duckworth
 

Someone told me that the TRRA used an old wooden coach to move employees around St Louis that I assume were difficult to access by car. 
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Kenneth Montero
 

Brian,
 
Thank you. I could not tell what was placed across the windows.
 
Ken Montero

On 08/21/2021 3:19 PM BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:
 
 
Looks to be a wood car with boards nailed over the windows. Prison cars wouldn’t be wooden. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Aug 21, 2021, at 1:53 PM, Kenneth Montero <va661midlo@...> wrote:

In the "gondola" picture, hHas asnyone commented on the open platform coach with so many bars across the windows as to cut out most of the viewing from those windows? Is it a car for transporting prisoners?
 
Ken Montero
On 08/21/2021 1:30 PM Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:
 
 
I had a private request for the Library of Congress links to the Jack Delano photos. Here are three that have influenced my model weathering.
 
When you download, choose the largest TIF file. I makes it easier to zoom in on the details.
 
RIP track area with gondola interiors. This was used on the cover of a Prototype Railroad Modeling volume.
https://www.loc.gov/item/2017878043/
 
Boxcars lined up at the Galewood freight house.
 
More boxcars at the Galewood freight house. This is one of my all time favorite weathering reference photos.
 
Don't be afraid to pull one of these into an image editor to lighten the levels. A little Photoshoppery brings out a few things you missed.
 
These Delano photos and the images Charlie shared are great freight car weathering inspiration.
 
Enjoy!
 
 
Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN
 
 
 
 
 
On 08/21/2021 10:09 AM Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:
 
 
Charlie,
  Thanks for posting these pictures.  Someone else has already mentioned "the
roof walks and their condition" ... I will add to that the prediction that if I or anyone
on this list were to "do up a collection of box cars that had the look of the
pictures you posted" ... that our fellow modelers would be highly likely to 
comment that "your cars look great - but I think you have overdone it a bit on
the roofwalks and amount of weathering for the yard as a whole".  They would
be telling us that we need to dial back the roofs - and they'd be wrong.  Not
"totally wrong/off base" - they are giving their honest opinion - but the evidence
that it was like these pictures show is often "over looked". 
  Perhaps we just don't have enough color pictures of freight car roofs ... ?

                                                              Thanks again for the great post ... Jim

P.S. Now to figure out how to add some of this stuff to my personal freight car
       fleet!
 
 

 


Kenneth Montero
 

Jack,
 
Thank you.
 
Ken Montero

On 08/21/2021 3:58 PM Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:
 
 
On Sat, Aug 21, 2021 at 11:53 AM, Kenneth Montero wrote:
Is it a car for transporting prisoners?
No, just an old wooden coach that had migrated into non-revenue service.  Boarded up either to protect windows from being broken or because they already have been.  The war years saw a lot of old equipment that had been stored during the depression pulled back into service.

Fwiw, it appears that the near end is jacked up for wheel change or other truck repair.

Jack Mullen


Rene LaVoise
 

Charlie,

Yes, the TRRA ran two employee trains around each shift change (7a, 3p 11p).  First left Union Station going clock-wise around the TRRA, the Second train ran counter-clockwise. The second was known as the Relay Cab, the first was referred to as the Merchants Cab.

There is a good one page overview of this operation in the TRRAH&TS Issue 51-52 / Summer-Autumn 1999.

--
René LaVoise
Kirkwood, MO


Ken Adams
 

These photos of car roofs remind us of the prevalence of soot from coal burning in the steam and transition eras. Rain apparently didn't wash much off. Reduced maintenance in the depression era and then WW 2 with car shortages and less available labor for washing cars would contribute to the grimy appearance.  As an early 1950's modeler of the far west should all of the box cars more than a few months after building or a repaint have shown this dark coating.  Railroads weren't the only source of the soot as everything burned coal in large parts of the country. 

I am not sure that the bunker oil burned in the far western part of the country caused as much soot or just that it was spread/dissipated over much larger areas.  Alco and Baldwin diesels certainly put out clouds of black exhaust.
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Eric Hansmann
 

I don’t think railroads washed freight cars. I believe that is a hobby myth. 

Private owners like FGE, PFE, SFRD, HJH, and others may have washed their cars. 

Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Aug 22, 2021, at 3:57 PM, Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...> wrote:

These photos of car roofs remind us of the prevalence of soot from coal burning in the steam and transition eras. Rain apparently didn't wash much off. Reduced maintenance in the depression era and then WW 2 with car shortages and less available labor for washing cars would contribute to the grimy appearance.  As an early 1950's modeler of the far west should all of the box cars more than a few months after building or a repaint have shown this dark coating.  Railroads weren't the only source of the soot as everything burned coal in large parts of the country. 

I am not sure that the bunker oil burned in the far western part of the country caused as much soot or just that it was spread/dissipated over much larger areas.  Alco and Baldwin diesels certainly put out clouds of black exhaust.
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io