replacement for Ambroid cement


ed_mines
 

What replacements are you using for the old go to Ambroid cement?

Apparently the last manufacturer gave up the the ghost.

I think Duco cement was an old time "new and improved" version of Ambroid which dried amber.

The 2021 version of Duco is too fast drying, probably due to the limited number of "environmentally friendly" solvents. One benefit of this newest formulation is a big bead of Duco cement dries almost flat - ie the solvent mix isn't very good at dissolving the plastic resin so the material coming out of the tube is high viscosity but low solids.

Anyone use canopy glue for bonding metal to wood? White glue for this application? How about white glue juiced up with some other adhesive? If so, what brand?

In the past I used white glue to assemble wood models, but I found that paint pulled back from exposed glue seams.

White glue is a good adhesive for wood and I still use it to join wood parts that do not show like end blocks.

Ed Mines
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Tim O'Connor
 


and brand of contact cement unless it's wood to wood, in which case use a wood glue

On 8/27/2021 3:36 PM, ed_mines via groups.io wrote:

What replacements are you using for the old go to Ambroid cement?


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


steve_wintner
 

Humbrol offers a "balsa" cement, which seems very similar to the old Ambroid. I've not used it much yet.

My furniture making has used a CA, Titebond and Gorilla glue, depending on application.  I'd expect to use CA for wood to metal hobby joints, but i suppose epoxy is also a candidate.

Ed, which brand is this Duco you are using?



steve_wintner
 

Some googling led me here: https://www.3riversarchery.com/nitrocellulose-adhesive-fletching-glue.html

There is also a German brand, UHU, which offers a few formulas. UHU Hart was recommended. I've also seen Alleskleber recommended for paper n wood. But as far as i know, only some UHU products are available stateside, and those aren't.


Ken Vandevoort
 

I use Beacon 527 for wood or metal or joining wood to metal.  I also use it to glue weights to plastic.  It is in the craft department at Walmart.  The 527 reminds me of Duco.

A very strong wood to wood glue is Sig-Bond.  It is made for flying model airplanes.  If it can hold up in the air, it should on the rails.

Ken Vandevoort


Jim Betz
 

Ed,
  Gorilla glue is excellent - I do not know if it forms a "fillet" in a corner ... without
putting it on the surfaces between the parts being joined.  I think of Gorilla as a
"high tech contact cement".
  Krystal Klear works well, forms a fillet (with or without being between the parts,
dries clear, is sandable and paintable ... and has a very long drying time.  It
will -not- hold parts together without assistance before it is dry.  KK can also be
used for forming glazing which is what it is sold for ... I rarely use it for that 
although it is excellent for headlight lenses (over SMD LEDs) and for places
windows where there is a lot of thickness such as a shake-the-box caboose.
KK is essentially pre-thinned out white glue and you can use white glue instead.
I like the fact that you can wet KK and it will soften and you can take stuff apart.
That is -not- possible with carpenter's glue.  KK is 'identical' to canopy cement.
  I often use "some form of caulk" such as DAP Easy/Ultra - especially useful
for different types of surfaces.  Like KK it needs 'clamping' until it has set up.
It has a shorter drying time than KK but is still quite long. 
  I prefer to not use CA - either thin or thick ... but always have some of it for
repairs to parts where I want it to wick into a joint.  CA crazes any glazing
other than glass and I do not like the way it 'flows away from the joint itself'.
  I've switched from Tenax (no longer available) to Tamiya for styrene.
  I never did try any adhesive you have to refridgerate - just too much fuss.

  Rubber bands often make excellent clamps.  I also like the "magnetic board"
systems for structures and car bodies.  Anytime I can I like to "put the model
together" (clamp/hold) and then apply adhesive to the seam.
                                                                                                                - Jim


Tony Thompson
 

ed mines 

What replacements are you using for the old go to Ambroid cement?

Anyone use canopy glue for bonding metal to wood? White glue for this application? How about white glue juiced up with some other adhesive? If so, what brand?

I have found canopy glue to be really excellent for dissimilar materials — plastic to wood, metal to plastic, in fact any combinations of hard and porous surfaces. Despite what some say, it is most certainly NOT Kristal Klear. That’s easy to prove — make up a joint of two dissimilar materials with KK and canopy glue, let them set for a few hours, and pull them apart.  Canopy glue is quite strong.

Pacer is one maker of canopy glue, with several individual brands. One of them Is Zap.

Tony Thompson



ed_mines
 

thanks to all who answered.

I'm using Devcon Duco cement.

Ed Mines