more glue questions Aleene's


John Mateyko
 

I've used Aleene's for many years.  First, the economics.  It is available in three sizes.  Approx 2 oz, then two larger sizes.
The large size is tempting, but the glue gets very thick about six months after opening so I buy the medium size which comes in 
a plastic, squeezable bottle.
The glue is white when it comes out of the tube and allows about five minutes of 'play time' before it starts to set and you can force it around for the next couple of minutes.  At fifteen minutes it is pretty much set.  Aleene's is water soluable so if you use it to construct a plastic building kit, if you need to take apart the building just set it in a tub of water for an hour or so, separate the pieces and pick off the dried glue.
I would not use it for trying to bond two pieces which could pull apart.  Whatever that strength is called, Aleene's does not have it.
If you would like to talk about it, send me a private message with your phone number and best time to call.
John Mateyko


ed_mines
 

Thanks John.
Have you used it to join 2 pieces of polystyrene? Cast resin kits? Wood to wood? Wood to metal, plastic?


John Mateyko
 

I've only used it on plastic building kits by Korber, Walthers and Ameri-Towne and when I bashed two Weaver boxcars into an X-42.
John


John Sykes III
 

Aleene's was originally developed by 3M to glue foam insulation to wood or plywood.  It's sales were poor compared to Liquid Nails so 3M sold the formula to the current manufacturer.  Per its original purpose, Aleene's needs something porous to make a good bond.  Blue foam and plywood are ideal.  It also works great with any paper based product (chip board, etc.).  If you glue blue foam to plywood, you will rip the foam apart trying to separate it.  It does not bond well with non-porous materials such as styrene to styrene and will spontanuiously debond.  I used it to attach signs to industrial buildings on my layout and after time, the signs fell right off.

-- John


Tim O'Connor
 

tensile strength - I agree, polyurethane glue not so much strength. might have temperature issues too
(like extreme cold vs heat).

for larger hidden joints and dissimilar materials my favorite is nasty old contact cement (eg Weldbond)
diluted with MEK which makes it non-stringy and easily brushed on each surface. i store the mix in a
Tamiya jar (60 ml or something) which has a vapor-tight cap. Best paint jar cap on the market IMO.

Tim O'Connor

On 9/28/2021 6:46 PM, John Mateyko wrote:
I've used Aleene's for many years.  First, the economics.  It is available in three sizes.  Approx 2 oz, then two larger sizes.
The large size is tempting, but the glue gets very thick about six months after opening so I buy the medium size which comes in
a plastic, squeezable bottle.
The glue is white when it comes out of the tube and allows about five minutes of 'play time' before it starts to set and you can force it around for the next couple of minutes.  At fifteen minutes it is pretty much set.  Aleene's is water soluable so if you use it to construct a plastic building kit, if you need to take apart the building just set it in a tub of water for an hour or so, separate the pieces and pick off the dried glue.
I would not use it for trying to bond two pieces which could pull apart.  Whatever that strength is called, Aleene's does not have it.
If you would like to talk about it, send me a private message with your phone number and best time to call.
John Mateyko
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Ken Vandevoort
 

Aleene's is named for Artis Aleene Eckstein.  When I had a hobby shop in the 70's which included crafts, she was well known in the craft business and I have attended a workshop she put on.  I believe she was from Solvang, California.  50 years later, the glue is still popular.

Ken Vandevoort