Another SFRD Question


Nelson Moyer
 

What might be the earliest and latest date a SFRD reefer built in 1945 be repainted? The answer to this question will determine whether I paint the U. S. Gypsum running board. According to the Santa Fe reefer book, beginning in 1944, new cars got unpainted steel running boards, but they were painted with black non-slip paint when cars were repainted.


Tim O'Connor
 


Nelson which classes were built in 1945 ?


On 12/19/2021 10:47 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

What might be the earliest and latest date a SFRD reefer built in 1945 be repainted? The answer to this question will determine whether I paint the U. S. Gypsum running board. According to the Santa Fe reefer book, beginning in 1944, new cars got unpainted steel running boards, but they were painted with black non-slip paint when cars were repainted.



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Bruce Smith
 

Nelson,

There is no precise answer to this question. A wreck repair might result in a repaint 6 months after building. Aggressive freight car repainting schedules would start at 4-5 years, and some might go as long as 10 years or more. Circa 1945, there isn't the labor to repaint on an aggressive schedule, while 3 years later there was.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...>
Sent: Sunday, December 19, 2021 9:47 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Another SFRD Question
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

What might be the earliest and latest date a SFRD reefer built in 1945 be repainted? The answer to this question will determine whether I paint the U. S. Gypsum running board. According to the Santa Fe reefer book, beginning in 1944, new cars got unpainted steel running boards, but they were painted with black non-slip paint when cars were repainted.


Nelson Moyer
 

Thanks, Bruce. I’m thinking a steel reefer might have a shorter ‘normal’ repaint schedule than a steel boxcar because of salt corrosion. I’m building three cars built in 1945 and one car built in 1948. I model 1953, so the 1948 build probably would have an unpainted running board and hatch platforms. The 1945 cars would be about eight years old in 1953. The question becomes, do I paint all three running boards and hatch platforms black, paint some but not others, or leave all of them unpainted? I hadn’t considered the labor issue just before and after the war.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Monday, December 20, 2021 1:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Another SFRD Question

 

Nelson,

 

There is no precise answer to this question. A wreck repair might result in a repaint 6 months after building. Aggressive freight car repainting schedules would start at 4-5 years, and some might go as long as 10 years or more. Circa 1945, there isn't the labor to repaint on an aggressive schedule, while 3 years later there was.

 

Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


Todd Sullivan
 

Nelson,

A different perspective and philosophy.  I like variety in my freight car fleet, so I weather my cars differently, even cars that have the same built dates.  Differences in travel, geographies traveled, and lading contribute to a car's overall weathering, so I try to depict that.  I'd probably paint and weather each of the 1945 cars differently.

Todd Sullivan


Nelson Moyer
 

That was my middle option in the reply to Bruce. Unless I hear that few steel reefers weren’t repainted by eight years, I’ll paint two and leave one unpainted. If I paint the running boards and hatch platforms, that means the paint would be 2-3 years old by 1953, so there wouldn’t be much corrosion or road grime. A car with unpainted running board and hatch platforms could look pretty dirty and corroded by 1953.

 

Reefer strings are the perfect cars to show off variable weathering, so that’s something I want to reproduce.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Todd Sullivan via groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 20, 2021 2:00 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Another SFRD Question

 

Nelson,

A different perspective and philosophy.  I like variety in my freight car fleet, so I weather my cars differently, even cars that have the same built dates.  Differences in travel, geographies traveled, and lading contribute to a car's overall weathering, so I try to depict that.  I'd probably paint and weather each of the 1945 cars differently.

Todd Sullivan

 


Tony Thompson
 




Nelson Moyer  wrote:
Thanks, Bruce. I’m thinking a steel reefer might have a shorter ‘normal’ repaint schedule than a steel boxcar because of salt corrosion. I’m building three cars built in 1945 and one car built in 1948. I model 1953 . . .

Modelers tend to exaggerate the role of salt in produce shipping, It was not widely used, and when used was small percentages like 5 percent, compared to the 20 or 30 percent often used with meat shipments.
PFE had the intent to repaint its steel cars every 10 to 12 years. Of course repairs or damage could result in earlier repainting. One could make the case, though, that most 1945-built cars wouldn’t really be up for repainting by 1953 (the same year I model, incidentally).

Tony Thompson



Philip Dove
 

Would l be right in assuming bare metal running boards were actually galvanised? Galvanized metal is difficult to paint when new, unless you give the galvanising some kind of acid wash or use a very aggressive etch primer which would damage the protective galvanising. Brand new galvanized metal is silver, as it gets older it dulls down to a mid blue grey, about the colour of grey on a UP diesel, perhaps a tad lighter..


Nelson Moyer
 

Of course the running boards and hatch platforms are galvanized steel. According to Santa Fe Railway Rolling Stock Reference Series Vol. 2 Refrigerator Cars, Ice Bunker Cars 1884-1979, beginning in 1944 steel running boards and hatch platforms were installed on all new equipment in compliance with the ban on wood running boards for new construction. The book further states that running boards and hatch platforms were painted with black non-slip paint when the cars were first repainted and on subsequent repaints. I fail to see the relevancy of your response.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Philip Dove
Sent: Monday, December 20, 2021 3:51 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Another SFRD Question

 

Would l be right in assuming bare metal running boards were actually galvanised? Galvanized metal is difficult to paint when new, unless you give the galvanising some kind of acid wash or use a very aggressive etch primer which would damage the protective galvanising. Brand new galvanized metal is silver, as it gets older it dulls down to a mid blue grey, about the colour of grey on a UP diesel, perhaps a tad lighter..


Nelson Moyer
 

Thank you , Tony! That’s exactly what I wanted to know to make an informed decision.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Monday, December 20, 2021 3:46 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Another SFRD Question

 

 

 



Nelson Moyer  wrote:

Thanks, Bruce. I’m thinking a steel reefer might have a shorter ‘normal’ repaint schedule than a steel boxcar because of salt corrosion. I’m building three cars built in 1945 and one car built in 1948. I model 1953 . . .

 

Modelers tend to exaggerate the role of salt in produce shipping, It was not widely used, and when used was small percentages like 5 percent, compared to the 20 or 30 percent often used with meat shipments.

PFE had the intent to repaint its steel cars every 10 to 12 years. Of course repairs or damage could result in earlier repainting. One could make the case, though, that most 1945-built cars wouldn’t really be up for repainting by 1953 (the same year I model, incidentally).

 

Tony Thompson

 

 


Tony Thompson
 

Philip Dove wrote:

Would l be right in assuming bare metal running boards were actually galvanised?
Yes, for any steel part, since before World War I.

Tony Thompson
tony@...