Wooden Box Cars with Peaked End Sheathing


Charles Greene
 

Does anybody have, or can anyone direct me to, photo(s) of wood box cars where the end sheathing (tongue and groove I presume) runs all the way to the peak of the car? Photos I've found so far of wood-sheathed box cars are those where the end sheathing stops at a horizontal line running from one side to the other. From that line to the peak is fascia board. I've attached a photo of a kit drawing that illustrates this type of construction. From research I've done so far, such cars may have been built in the late 19th century. I'd like to decal the model I'm assembling with a historically-correct road name consistent with the period when such cars were built.  

            -Chuck 


Charles Greene
 

I should have been a little clearer in my description. As you can see in the drawing, the sheathing actually forms a peak just under the actual peak of the roof. Fascia board follows that peak shape, as you can see in the drawing.

           -Chuck


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

Need more info. From the drawing, it appears to be a truss rod underframe car, that correct? 36' or 40'? What kit? What is A.C.? I don't recall anyone that made a kit for an Algoma Central boxcar.

Dennis Storzek


Ray Breyer
 

Pick a prototype, and modify the model to match. Virtually all wood-roofed boxcars had a fascia, which was there to cover and protect the roof carlines (it's not decorative). Adding end fascia boards shouldn't take more than  couple of minutes.

I just breezed through about 1,000 double sheathed boxcar builder photos, and didn't find ANY without end fascias (if you head to the LoC website and look up Civil War railroad photos you'll find a few cars there without fascias).

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL



On Thursday, January 20, 2022, 06:18:35 PM CST, Charles Greene <greenec1144@...> wrote:


Does anybody have, or can anyone direct me to, photo(s) of wood box cars where the end sheathing (tongue and groove I presume) runs all the way to the peak of the car? Photos I've found so far of wood-sheathed box cars are those where the end sheathing stops at a horizontal line running from one side to the other. From that line to the peak is fascia board. I've attached a photo of a kit drawing that illustrates this type of construction. From research I've done so far, such cars may have been built in the late 19th century. I'd like to decal the model I'm assembling with a historically-correct road name consistent with the period when such cars were built.  

            -Chuck 


Dave Parker
 

I'm not sure Ray understood the question, or else I don't.  I took it as did early (how early) DS box cars have (a) single fascia boards with a horizontal bottom edge, or (b) two fascia boards per end such that their bottom edges paralleled the roof pitch?  And the answer is yes, plenty of examples of both.

But I don't quite understand quite what Chuck is looking for.  A prototype to closely match the model?  If so, there are a number of other spotting features that should be considered.

In the FWIW department, early (truss-rod) Swift reefers sported both styles of end fascias, even within the same car series.  I don't think it was a particularly rigid design element in cars of the time.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Ray Breyer
 

>>I'm not sure Ray understood the question, or else I don't.  I took it as did early (how early) DS box cars have 
>>(a) single fascia boards with a horizontal bottom edge, or (b) two fascia boards per end such that their bottom 
>>edges paralleled the roof pitch? 
>>Dave Parker


Hi Dave, 

I read this:

>>Does anybody have, or can anyone direct me to, photo(s) of wood box cars where the end sheathing
>>runs all the way to the peak of the car? Photos I've found so far of wood-sheathed box cars are those 
>>where the end sheathing stops at a horizontal line running from one side to the other. From that line 
>>to the peak is fascia board.

So I'm reading NO fascia.
And from what I can tell, that's a mid-19th Century car design. See attached.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL




Dave Parker
 

Ray:

Did you read Chuck's second, follow-up message?

Dave
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Bob Thompson
 

Here’s a late 1880s 33’ 20 ton Canadian Pacific car. Drawings in the CPHA library show a similar 1890s 35’ 30 ton car with the same style of end facia. 


Bob Thompson
North Saanich, BC


Ray Breyer
 

Well, I did NOW...
So Chuck's looking for one specific needle in a stack of 800,000 needles. Maybe up to 1.5 million needles.

My first email stands: as STMFC is a prototype-based forum, pick a specific prototype and model it. Let the fascias fall where they may.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


On Thursday, January 20, 2022, 11:40:14 PM CST, Dave Parker via groups.io <spottab@...> wrote:


Ray:

Did you read Chuck's second, follow-up message?


Dave
--
Dave Parker

Swall Meadows, CA


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Thu, Jan 20, 2022 at 11:14 PM, Ray Breyer wrote:
My first email stands: as STMFC is a prototype-based forum, pick a specific prototype and model it. Let the fascias fall where they may.
The fascia is really only a trim board. Its function is two fold, to provide one more layer to shed water running off the roof, and keep nails from the roofing from penetrating the car siding so close to the end of the boards. So, either shape is equally suitable for the purpose. The narrow fascia was much more common, likely because it used less material, and required less labor to cut, but some car builders or owners seemed to see some advantage to using the wide, straight bottom board.

Dennis Storzek


Charles Greene
 

Hey fellas, thanks for all the replies....

Dennis- The kit is a Scotia Scale Models 36 ft. truss-rod box car. "A.C." are initials for a fictitious road, Atlantic Central, which was chosen by Scotia's distributor, R.H. Schaer Enterprises in New Brunswick, Canada for this particular car (so the info sheet says). 

Dave- Your second guess at what I'm describing is correct, viz. two fascia boards per end such that their bottom [and top (my edit)] edges paralleled the roof pitch. And, yes, I'd like to see a prototype (preferably a car from a U.S. road) that matches the model's end construction. You say there are plenty of examples of that construction. Can/would you point me to a photo source for them? You mentioned Swift reefers, but I'd rather find a box car, if possible. 

Ray- First, 'Hi, Neighbor'...I'm just south of you in St. Charles. Yes, those boards below the roof that mimic the pitch of the roof are fascia. Of the 3 photo examples of cars you provided the C&NW one has fascia design closest to my model's. The only difference is the ends of the boards where they flare slightly upwards.

Bob- The C.P. box car you show has the exact fascia construction I'm seeking...I'd just prefer a U.S. road if I can find one.

            -Chuck