Another Finish Repair Question


Chris Barkan
 

I have another finish question that I think is sufficiently different from Eric's that rather than intertwine the two, leading to potential confusion about which question is being referred to, I am starting a new thread.

How does one remove old decals that appear to have separated from the base they were attached to but preserve the paint finish?  These are old models not finished by me but I think there was probably some sort of clear finish applied over the decals.  I am thinking some very gentle abrasion process might work but would like suggestions for how to do this, or any other ideas.   I realize that there will need to be some touch-up of the paint after this is done.   Thanks for any insights or suggestions.
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

I would try sanding only the area covered by the decal film with 220 or 380 grit wet or dry paper (available at an auto parts store that sells auto painting supplies or a GOOD hardware store). My favorite tool for this is an old artist brush handle cut off at an angle, to make a  elliptical flat surface that the paper is glued to. The purpose for sanding is to remove the clear finish over as much of the decal film surface as possible... when the decal printing starts to go away you know you're there. Then, flood the decal with a strong decal setting solution, to soften the film, keeping it wet until the film can be scrubbed off with a stiff paintbrush. With patience it is doable, but not quickly.

Dennis Storzek


Tim O'Connor
 

Dennis

I have found that the tiny acrylic sanding blocks - the size of a finger tip - are excellent
for precise sanding of small surface areas. I got a set from National Scale Car and I glued
a couple of different size grit papers to them.

On 1/24/2022 7:22 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
I would try sanding only the area covered by the decal film with 220 or 380 grit wet or dry paper (available at an auto parts store that sells auto painting supplies or a GOOD hardware store). My favorite tool for this is an old artist brush handle cut off at an angle, to make a  elliptical flat surface that the paper is glued to. The purpose for sanding is to remove the clear finish over as much of the decal film surface as possible... when the decal printing starts to go away you know you're there. Then, flood the decal with a strong decal setting solution, to soften the film, keeping it wet until the film can be scrubbed off with a stiff paintbrush. With patience it is doable, but not quickly.

Dennis Storzek
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Eric Hansmann
 

There’s also Testor’s Easy Lift Off to apply sparingly with a cotton swab.

https://www.testors.com/product-catalog/testors-brands/model-master/primers-top-coats-thinners-cleaners/paint-and-decal-remover

 

It might be too aggressive but is another tool for the tool box.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Monday, January 24, 2022 6:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Another Finish Repair Question

 

I would try sanding only the area covered by the decal film with 220 or 380 grit wet or dry paper (available at an auto parts store that sells auto painting supplies or a GOOD hardware store). My favorite tool for this is an old artist brush handle cut off at an angle, to make a  elliptical flat surface that the paper is glued to. The purpose for sanding is to remove the clear finish over as much of the decal film surface as possible... when the decal printing starts to go away you know you're there. Then, flood the decal with a strong decal setting solution, to soften the film, keeping it wet until the film can be scrubbed off with a stiff paintbrush. With patience it is doable, but not quickly.

Dennis Storzek