Loading Finished Lumber


Bob Chaparro
 

Loading Finished Lumber

A photo from the UC Davis Library’s Digital Collections:

https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-1/P-1776

What caught my eye about this photograph is the elaborate protective lining in the boxcar.

I’ve never seen this before. Anyone know how common this was?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Mar 19, 2022, at 10:58, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Loading Finished Lumber
A photo from the UC Davis Library’s Digital Collections:
https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-1/P-1776
What caught my eye about this photograph is the elaborate protective lining in the boxcar.
I’ve never seen this before. Anyone know how common this was?
I've not, but I suspect that it's select or better lumber; the "Red River" in the caption brings to mind Bob Hanft's book by that name, but my copy is inaccessible at the moment. If it's in the book or in a collection connected to the book, I'd suspect Westwood CA rather than Akeley MN, but that's showing my geographical bias.
--
Little Willie from the mirror sucked the mercury all off
Thinking in his childish error it would cure his whooping cought.
At the funeral Willie's mother said to Mrs. Brown,
"Twas a chilly day for Willie when the mercury went down.


Charles Peck
 

Considering that the roof was covered as well, My guess is that it was for waterproofing. 
Perhaps straight grain millwork grade lumber, high value? 
Chuck Peck

On Sat, Mar 19, 2022 at 1:58 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Loading Finished Lumber

A photo from the UC Davis Library’s Digital Collections:

https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-1/P-1776

What caught my eye about this photograph is the elaborate protective lining in the boxcar.

I’ve never seen this before. Anyone know how common this was?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Todd Sullivan
 

I agree with Chuck.  The boards on the floor of the boxcar look to be high grade 'clear' pine, which is the most costly softwood 'stick lumber' available in hardware stores currently.

Todd Sullivan


Tim O'Connor
 


It's just kraft paper - Yes, high quality millwork number that nowadays would be wrapped
with paper. It's being carefully stacked, too.


On 3/19/2022 3:00 PM, Charles Peck wrote:
Considering that the roof was covered as well, My guess is that it was for waterproofing. 
Perhaps straight grain millwork grade lumber, high value? 
Chuck Peck

On Sat, Mar 19, 2022 at 1:58 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Loading Finished Lumber

A photo from the UC Davis Library’s Digital Collections:

https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-1/P-1776

What caught my eye about this photograph is the elaborate protective lining in the boxcar.

I’ve never seen this before. Anyone know how common this was?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Dave Nelson
 

It is Westwood CA., the date is 1936.

The Red River Lumber Co. was one of the largest in the west and Robert Hanff's book is an excellent account of its history.

A bit of trivia: AFAIK Red River took the folk lore Paul Bunyan and used the name and an image in its marketing starting .ca 1916-17 and lasting into WWII. Its use this way may explain why the folk lore became so well known.

Two other RR tidbits: They had a deal w/ PG&E for a certain amount of really inexpensive electricity. In the winter they closely monitored usage if there was plenty to spare they electrified a large grid of rails and dropped it into the ice cold holding pond so as to melt the ice on the lake.

2nd, when the soon-to-become Lake Almanor basin was identified as a reservoir, RR bid on blearing and got the contract. They then strung overhead wire above the WP main and used a pair of all-electric box cabs to move the logs to mill. Mind you, this is in the high Sierra.

Dave Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nolan Hinshaw
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2022 11:50 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Loading Finished Lumber

On Mar 19, 2022, at 10:58, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Loading Finished Lumber
A photo from the UC Davis Library’s Digital Collections:
https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-1/P-1776
What caught my eye about this photograph is the elaborate protective lining in the boxcar.
I’ve never seen this before. Anyone know how common this was?
I've not, but I suspect that it's select or better lumber; the "Red River" in the caption brings to mind Bob Hanft's book by that name, but my copy is inaccessible at the moment. If it's in the book or in a collection connected to the book, I'd suspect Westwood CA rather than Akeley MN, but that's showing my geographical bias.
--
Little Willie from the mirror sucked the mercury all off Thinking in his childish error it would cure his whooping cought.
At the funeral Willie's mother said to Mrs. Brown, "Twas a chilly day for Willie when the mercury went down.


Dave Nelson
 

And here is the proof of craft paper as a boxcar liner: (same collection as before)

https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-1/P-1776

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2022 12:39 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Loading Finished Lumber

 


It's just kraft paper - Yes, high quality millwork number that nowadays would be wrapped
with paper. It's being carefully stacked, too.



Dave Nelson
 

List members may enjoy this photo of the sawdust mountain at Red River Lumber:

https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-0/P-0243

 

Dave Nelson


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

My research on the Yosemite Valley Railroad suggested that, after abandonment, 10 of the YVRR log cars were sold to Red River Lumber Company. If someone has a copy of Hanft's book, I would appreciate confirmation of my research.

Jack Burgess
jack@...

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nolan Hinshaw
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2022 11:50 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Loading Finished Lumber

On Mar 19, 2022, at 10:58, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Loading Finished Lumber
A photo from the UC Davis Library’s Digital Collections:
https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-1/P-1776
What caught my eye about this photograph is the elaborate protective lining in the boxcar.
I’ve never seen this before. Anyone know how common this was?
I've not, but I suspect that it's select or better lumber; the "Red River" in the caption brings to mind Bob Hanft's book by that name, but my copy is inaccessible at the moment. If it's in the book or in a collection connected to the book, I'd suspect Westwood CA rather than Akeley MN, but that's showing my geographical bias.
--
Little Willie from the mirror sucked the mercury all off Thinking in his childish error it would cure his whooping cought.
At the funeral Willie's mother said to Mrs. Brown, "Twas a chilly day for Willie when the mercury went down.


Brian Stokes
 

It looks to be pretty clear and quarter-sawn wood, and it is being loaded indoors so probably high-value lumber. Great photo!



--
Brian Stokes
North Point Street in Proto:48


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

It doesn't look quartersawn to me, I can see flatsawn grain in many of the pieces, and it's not being loaded inside, as I can see the rails in this platform outside the door:
https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-1/P-1940
The only reason I can think of for the expensive papering job in the car is the end user doesn't want any water stains on the wood. A big problem with unlined steel roofs was moisture from the load would condense on the roof sheets and drip back down, bringing the dirt that was on the roof sheets with it. I can't think what pine product would be that sensitive, but the consignee must have had problems before. This really isn't "finished lumber", yes, it's planed to thickness, but still random width, the way hardwood was normally sold years ago.

Dennis Storzek


Scott H. Haycock
 

You can still buy wood this way. This looks like 3/4 S2S (surfaced two sides). This wood started as 5/4 lumber cut on a bandsaw from whole logs. It is then sent to a planing mill to have the surfaces planed to 3/4 thickness, and smoother for use. 

The final user will reduce the width into usable boards.
 

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent

On 03/19/2022 6:41 PM Dennis Storzek <dennis@...> wrote:


It doesn't look quartersawn to me, I can see flatsawn grain in many of the pieces, and it's not being loaded inside, as I can see the rails in this platform outside the door:
https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-1/P-1940
The only reason I can think of for the expensive papering job in the car is the end user doesn't want any water stains on the wood. A big problem with unlined steel roofs was moisture from the load would condense on the roof sheets and drip back down, bringing the dirt that was on the roof sheets with it. I can't think what pine product would be that sensitive, but the consignee must have had problems before. This really isn't "finished lumber", yes, it's planed to thickness, but still random width, the way hardwood was normally sold years ago.

Dennis Storzek


Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Mar 19, 2022, at 13:07, Dave Nelson <Western.Pacific.203@...> wrote:

List members may enjoy this photo of the sawdust mountain at Red River Lumber:
https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-0/P-0243
I remember seeing that when I were a wee lad. It was on the way from Chester to Susanville to visit some of Dad's Paiute friends who lived off the rez, and Dad thought it'd impress us two kids. It did.
--
Willie was a chemist,
Now Willie is no more.
What Willie thought was H2O
Was H2SO4


William Reed
 

Even happened on the D&RGW NG. This is at Weidmen Lumber outside Durango in the 1960's. 

William
aka drgwk37


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Nolan Hinshaw <nualain48@...>
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2022 2:49 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Loading Finished Lumber
 
On Mar 19, 2022, at 10:58, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:
>
> Loading Finished Lumber
> A photo from the UC Davis Library’s Digital Collections:
> https://digital.ucdavis.edu/collection/eastman/D-051/P-1/P-1776
> What caught my eye about this photograph is the elaborate protective lining in the boxcar.
> I’ve never seen this before. Anyone know how common this was?

I've not, but I suspect that it's select or better lumber; the "Red River" in the caption brings to mind Bob Hanft's book by that name, but my copy is inaccessible at the moment. If it's in the book or in a collection connected to the book, I'd suspect Westwood CA rather than Akeley MN, but that's showing my geographical bias.
--
Little Willie from the mirror sucked the mercury all off
Thinking in his childish error it would cure his whooping cought.
At the funeral Willie's mother said to Mrs. Brown,
"Twas a chilly day for Willie when the mercury went down.







Brian Stokes
 

Dennis, 

If it was plain sawn wouldn't you see much more variety in the end grain? I don't see much in the way of plain-sawn ends in the pile though I'm by no means a professional.  And it definitely looks like its being loaded under cover - if not indoors. Your second photo seems to confirm that. Interesting that the cars are what seem to be getting protected, not the lumber being loaded as it is in the open elements all around the platform. 

--
Brian Stokes
North Point Street in Proto:48


Alex Huff
 

I concur with Dennis Storzek's comment on condensation.  It was a seasonable problem in boxcars loaded with rolls of fiberboard used to make food cartons.  The solution was to cover the tops of the roll stacks with scrap fiberboard laid flat when the car was loaded.  Cars originated in the south.  The ones I saw were in South Dakota, unloaded indoors within the warehouse portion of the plant.   


Bill J.
 

Where’s the Burma Shave sign!?

bill jolitz


David Wiggs
 

It appears that the loaded car to the left is out of balance and the far side wheels off the rail.  Also, the track to the right seems really wide in gauge; of course it may just be light weight rail that is buried.

Davo in Orlando


Tim O'Connor
 


pure rainwater won't make the wood dirty - but drips from the top or sides of a box car could
I think Dennis is right it just keeps the wood clean. a brief exposure to a little clean water won't hurt.


On 3/20/2022 11:16 AM, Brian Stokes wrote:
Dennis, 

If it was plain sawn wouldn't you see much more variety in the end grain? I don't see much in the way of plain-sawn ends in the pile though I'm by no means a professional.  And it definitely looks like its being loaded under cover - if not indoors. Your second photo seems to confirm that. Interesting that the cars are what seem to be getting protected, not the lumber being loaded as it is in the open elements all around the platform. 

--
Brian Stokes

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Sun, Mar 20, 2022 at 08:16 AM, Brian Stokes wrote:
If it was plain sawn wouldn't you see much more variety in the end grain? I don't see much in the way of plain-sawn ends in the pile though I'm by no means a professional.  And it definitely looks like its being loaded under cover - if not indoors. Your second photo seems to confirm that. Interesting that the cars are what seem to be getting protected, not the lumber being loaded as it is in the open elements all around the platform. 
Except the length hasn't been trimmed, so are really rough from the chain saw cuts used to cut the logs to saw log length. the swirly pattern of the grain visible on the clean planed surface is characteristic of flat or plain sawn lumber. Quartersawn  is a wasteful method used to bring out the unique grain pattern of wood species that have RAYS, bands of cells that grow radially from the center of the log outward, such as oak. It is not normally done with conifers. What was common with Douglas Fir that was to be used for either flooring or siding was edge sawn, where the log was plain sawn into planks with thickness equal to the width of the product to be produced, then re-sawn into multiple boards. This put the annual rings mostly perpendicular to the face of the board, which made for very featureless grain that was wear resistant and held paint well.

Dennis Storzek