Gon interior pt 1


Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Folks;

 

Thought you’d enjoy the attached and see if anyone had the guts to model it.

 

I talked to a few of my friends, and we think it is a bad repair of a burned-out wooden floor.  The MRY is south of the PRR/Mon, which hosted many mills producing hot steel products like ingots and hot coil.  Correspondence has many examples of burnt-out cars.

 

These bad boys look great in a train, and then as a set-out or action (fire-fighting) in an ops session.

 

I have a number of bed order cars.  They usually cause much consternation.

 

What are your thoughts on this cool car?

 

Elden Gatwood


Philip Dove
 

It's operable as long as you don't load it with gravel, coal, ore etc. As and when there are a surplus of Gondolas and capacity in repair facilities then repair it. Perhaps outside the STMFC era it would be classed as unsafe. 


On Thu, 24 Mar 2022, 15:30 Gatwood, Elden J SAD, <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

Folks;

 

Thought you’d enjoy the attached and see if anyone had the guts to model it.

 

I talked to a few of my friends, and we think it is a bad repair of a burned-out wooden floor.  The MRY is south of the PRR/Mon, which hosted many mills producing hot steel products like ingots and hot coil.  Correspondence has many examples of burnt-out cars.

 

These bad boys look great in a train, and then as a set-out or action (fire-fighting) in an ops session.

 

I have a number of bed order cars.  They usually cause much consternation.

 

What are your thoughts on this cool car?

 

Elden Gatwood


Robert kirkham
 

Somehow, this fired the imagination a bit: how would you model a gon rolling along in a train while on fire .  .  .   

(Coming back to reality,) good thoughts!  No, I am not doing anything more than showing bad paint and rust, but will need to give that a re-think.  

I suspect it is a much more noticeable element in some regions and some portions of some railroads than other places on the same railroad, or other railroads or regions.  But that’s just conjecture.
 
Rob



On Mar 24, 2022, at 8:10 AM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

Folks;

 

Thought you’d enjoy the attached and see if anyone had the guts to model it.

 

I talked to a few of my friends, and we think it is a bad repair of a burned-out wooden floor.  The MRY is south of the PRR/Mon, which hosted many mills producing hot steel products like ingots and hot coil.  Correspondence has many examples of burnt-out cars.

 

These bad boys look great in a train, and then as a set-out or action (fire-fighting) in an ops session.

 

I have a number of bed order cars.  They usually cause much consternation.

 

What are your thoughts on this cool car?

 

Elden Gatwood

<PRR 751817 on MRY 1930.jpg>


np328
 

I think I have off handedly commented when talking about open-top load cars - like gons. 
     My modeled railroad - regarding drop bottom gons, had some extended correspondence about the damage to the drop bottom doors done by the
teeth of clam shell buckets being used to unload coal and other commodities. The teeth would grab at the protruding corners of the doors and buckle them,
and damage in other ways so as to render the doors no longer useable. Corrugated doors were noted to promote the teeth to slide over them and sustain less damage. 
    In the summer when gondola cars were in commercial usage, my railroad tried laying heavy timbers on the floor, IIRC, 6 x 12 inch timbers laid flat, as sacrificial flooring. 
Equipping a good number of cars and the tight fisted and frugal nature in spending of my railroad, the benefits must have out weighed the cost. Part of the above conversation I found. 
Gons were typically loaded over the trucks so to see boards missing there, could have well been done by clamshell bucket teeth after being dropped into the car. 

I think damage like this is more common than thought. 

      Elden, why would this car not be sent to the nearest RIP track?
Should a brakeman or some other person be walking through the car at night, for any reason, and injure themself, it would be a slam dunk lawsuit. And something car inspectors would call out the moment they saw it. Having paged through more than a few railroad investigations, I could see folks who would have had their career ended had they noted this car, someone got injured and they not flagged it.   
      Given the building to the left looking like a railroad structure, might this be a RIP track photo documenting in preparation for a invoice to be sent out.    
                                                                                                                                                                                           James Dick - Roseville, MN 
  


ed_mines
 

I wonder if trainmen did walk through empty gons (or even loaded ones).

I think the most common inside height of 40 ft. gons was 4'8". I wonder how many men could lift themselves up over the end, especially if the train is moving.

I am a little taller than average and worked out with weights for many years. I entered weight lifting contests and once did 35 chin ups. At my most efficient weight I would have had difficulty getting over the end of a gon.

Stepping into a gon loaded with scrap metal could be treacherous if you slipped. Trying to walk on a load that could shift could be dangerous too.

In photos Lehigh Valley steam era trains have rows of empty gons. Erie fast freights don't have any gons or hoppers.


Robert kirkham
 

if we take this practical issue and extrapolate to its impact on train crew, i wonder whether it would result in some thought about placement of those treacherous loads in a train.  Maybe where front and tail end crew shake hands in the middle?  Just wondering - I have no reason to think this was seen.

Rob

On Mar 26, 2022, at 1:34 PM, ed_mines via groups.io <ed_mines@...> wrote:

I wonder if trainmen did walk through empty gons (or even loaded ones).

I think the most common inside height of 40 ft. gons was 4'8". I wonder how many men could lift themselves up over the end, especially if the train is moving.

I am a little taller than average and worked out with weights for many years. I entered weight lifting contests and once did 35 chin ups. At my most efficient weight I would have had difficulty getting over the end of a gon.

Stepping into a gon loaded with scrap metal could be treacherous if you slipped. Trying to walk on a load that could shift could be dangerous too.

In photos Lehigh Valley steam era trains have rows of empty gons. Erie fast freights don't have any gons or hoppers.



Mark Vinski
 

When brakemen had to ride the cars to apply the brakes I imagine they had to walk through gondolas.

I used to heat my home with a wood stove that burned scrap 4x4's from gondolas. I've been in and out of hundreds of them, a few of which had floors as bad or worse than the picture. The ribs in the car end can be used as steps to climb out. Some cars with a flat plate on the interior of the ends have rectangular holes cut in the plate to serve as steps.

There was a derailment near Pittsburgh caused by a piece of scrap metal that fell through a defective floor and prevented the truck from turning on a curve.

Rules now prohibit trainmen from riding inside loaded gons due to the shifting hazard..

Mark Vinski


akerboomk
 

Or back in the day where meat processing offal was carried in gondolas.
There were a few brakemen who encountered a not so pleasant "surprise"
--
Ken Akerboom


Bob Chaparro
 

Yes, it took real guts to handle these cars. Not so much to model them.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Tim O'Connor
 


Urp. One of the cars has wood sides!

On 3/27/2022 1:27 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Douglas Harding
 

Yep, just like hide cars. Wood cars were used, you just didn’t want them to leak, much.

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Sunday, March 27, 2022 1:18 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Gon interior pt 1

 


Urp. One of the cars has wood sides!

On 3/27/2022 1:27 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Yes, it took real guts to handle these cars. Not so much to model them.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Attachments:

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts