Stiff Shackle


Don Burn
 

I suspect that much of the confusion is because if you check some standard references on electric railroads they indicate that the Claremont Electric placed a higher interest on freight service than most electric railroads in New England. The fact that the locals bought it from a New York firm in the early 20's to keep the passenger service to me indicates it still was regarded as a trolley or interurban but just one that had freight service.

Don Burn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2022 2:04 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Stiff Shackle

On Mon, May 23, 2022 at 01:08 PM, Dave Parker wrote:


I think there is some conflation (and confusion) happening here with respect to the Claremont Railway and Lighting Co, the Claremont Branch of the B&M, the Claremont and Concord and, way after our era, the Claremont Concord (no "and"). Scott Whitney wrote the "book:" on this rich history -- see RMC 11/93, 12/93, and 1/94.

And no, the original CR&LC line was not a trolley line. It was purpose-built to move freight in and out of the heavily industrialized town of Claremont and to connect with the B&M. Passenger service was "of secondary importance" (as per Scott).

I beg to differ. This site: http://nashuacitystation.org/history/claremont-railway-and-lighting-company/ shows there was both a street railway and power company in the corporate past, and if trackage was built specifically to serve industries, it was built to take advantage of the tighter curves the trolley line style motive power could navigate, setting them up for endless grief in later years. The fact remains, the "stiff shackle" was not something that a normal 'steam railroad' crew would have to deal with.



Dennis Storzek


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Mon, May 23, 2022 at 01:08 PM, Dave Parker wrote:
I think there is some conflation (and confusion) happening here with respect to the Claremont Railway and Lighting Co, the Claremont Branch of the B&M, the Claremont and Concord and, way after our era, the Claremont Concord (no "and").  Scott Whitney wrote the "book:" on this rich history -- see RMC 11/93, 12/93, and 1/94.

And no, the original CR&LC line was not a trolley line.  It was purpose-built to move freight in and out of the heavily industrialized town of Claremont and to connect with the B&M.  Passenger service was "of secondary importance" (as per Scott).
I beg to differ. This site: http://nashuacitystation.org/history/claremont-railway-and-lighting-company/ shows there was both a street railway and power company in the corporate past, and if trackage was built specifically to serve industries, it was built to take advantage of the tighter curves the trolley line style motive power could navigate, setting them up for endless grief in later years. The fact remains, the "stiff shackle" was not something that a normal 'steam railroad' crew would have to deal with.



Dennis Storzek


Dave Parker
 

I think there is some conflation (and confusion) happening here with respect to the Claremont Railway and Lighting Co, the Claremont Branch of the B&M, the Claremont and Concord and, way after our era, the Claremont Concord (no "and").  Scott Whitney wrote the "book:" on this rich history -- see RMC 11/93, 12/93, and 1/94.

And no, the original CR&LC line was not a trolley line.  It was purpose-built to move freight in and out of the heavily industrialized town of Claremont and to connect with the B&M.  Passenger service was "of secondary importance" (as per Scott).
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Mon, May 23, 2022 at 10:39 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:

In addition, this was photographed on the Claremont and Concord Railway, a short line spun off from the B&M and well known for its tight radii, steep grades, and street running. Bruce Davison, who is pictured, has a podcast describing his railroad experiences at https://www.bmrrhs.org/highgreen/2021/8/20/high-green-episode-11-bruce-davison-part-1

I believe the C&C was originally a trolley line. A lot of trolley lines, while built for passenger service, tried to get into carload freight during the twenties and thirties as the passenger ridership dropped on account of increased automobile ownership. At that time freight cars were smaller, a 40 foot car was the longest commonly seen. Those lines that lasted after WWII as diesel shortlines had to do all sorts of creative things to handle the longer cars that became common.

By the way, the common name for both these things and the longer ones used to move disabled streetcars is drawbar.

Dennis Storzek


Nolan Hinshaw
 

On May 23, 2022, at 09:42, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Stiff Shackle
This photo is from the Boston & Maine Railroad Historical Society.
Caption:
“West Claremont, NH, Bruce installs a “stiff shackle” between the locomotive and the freight car in order to negotiate the tight curve into Coy Paper.”
Yes, the photo was taken after 1960 but it shows a device that probably predates 1960.
What more is known about a “stiff shackle”?
The thing resembles the roosters that coupled streetcars (trams) for towing purposes. Happens between PCC cars in San Francisco on occasion.
--
Willie saw some dynamite
Couldn't understand it quite
Curiosity never pays;
It rained Willie seven days.


Bruce Smith
 

Bob,

 

In addition, this was photographed on the Claremont and Concord Railway, a short line spun off from the B&M and well known for its tight radii, steep grades, and street running. Bruce Davison, who is pictured, has a podcast describing his railroad experiences at https://www.bmrrhs.org/highgreen/2021/8/20/high-green-episode-11-bruce-davison-part-1

 

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "Bob Chaparro via groups.io" <chiefbobbb@...>
Reply-To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Monday, May 23, 2022 at 11:42 AM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Stiff Shackle

 

CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

Stiff Shackle

This photo is from the Boston & Maine Railroad Historical Society.

Caption:

“West Claremont, NH, Bruce installs a “stiff shackle” between the locomotive and the freight car in order to negotiate the tight curve into Coy Paper.”

Yes, the photo was taken after 1960 but it shows a device that probably predates 1960.

What more is known about a “stiff shackle”?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Edward
 

It's basically like the link of the 19th century a link and pin coupler.
However, the shackle bar has a hole at each end into which the coupler knuckle pins are inserted after removing both knuckles.
They are likely on the ground, beside the locomotive and cars.
In this photo the brakeman is inserting the knuckle pin in one end of the shackle that has been pushed into the coupler head.

The next step is trickier.
The shackle must be guided into the other coupler head as the cars are moved closer together.
Once in place, the other knuckle pin is then inserted after getting the holes to line up.

Removing the knuckles and putting in a shackle bar as a link enables cars to negotiate a much wider offset on tight curves than they could if coupled with their knuckles.
The stiff shackle is longer than having the knuckles in place and joined,
It can swing the entire width of the openings of both coupler heads if need be. 

It's only a temporary set up and no doubt the railroad has specific rules written on how to do this procedure.
The cars will have their coupler knuckles re-installed after all is done and the car is spotted on the siding.
It will be a process to do over again when removing that car from the siding. 

Ed Bommer


Ted Schnepf
 

Hi Bob,

The knuckle has been removed from each coupler.  The tank car knuckle is laying on the tank car running board. The brakeman is installing the knuckle pin into basically an old fashioned link, from link and pin days.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


847=697-5353


On Monday, May 23, 2022, 11:42:43 AM CDT, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Stiff Shackle

This photo is from the Boston & Maine Railroad Historical Society.

Caption:

“West Claremont, NH, Bruce installs a “stiff shackle” between the locomotive and the freight car in order to negotiate the tight curve into Coy Paper.”

Yes, the photo was taken after 1960 but it shows a device that probably predates 1960.

What more is known about a “stiff shackle”?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Attachments:


Bob Chaparro
 

Stiff Shackle

This photo is from the Boston & Maine Railroad Historical Society.

Caption:

“West Claremont, NH, Bruce installs a “stiff shackle” between the locomotive and the freight car in order to negotiate the tight curve into Coy Paper.”

Yes, the photo was taken after 1960 but it shows a device that probably predates 1960.

What more is known about a “stiff shackle”?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA