Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery (1949)


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery (1949)

A photo from the Gateway To Oklahoma History website:

https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc1551992/m1/1/?q=Loading

Description:

“Photograph of the railroad loading site at the Slayer Refining Company, 2201 Northeast 2nd Street, Oklahoma City, OK, as it appeared in May, 1949.”

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Bob and List Members,

Thanks Bob for the nice image

I think the tank car closest to the camera is GPCX 282, or maybe 288.

According to http://www.nakina.net/other/report/reportg.html the reporting marks GPCX belong to General Petroleum Corp on the date of this photograph

I want to say the other tank car has GATX reporting marks, but the lettering is unclear and tough to decipher, so cannot say for sure.

Claus Schlund


On 18-Jun-22 10:58, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery (1949)

A photo from the Gateway To Oklahoma History website:

https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc1551992/m1/1/?q=Loading

Description:

“Photograph of the railroad loading site at the Slayer Refining Company, 2201 Northeast 2nd Street, Oklahoma City, OK, as it appeared in May, 1949.”

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bruce Smith
 

Claus, Folks,

It also looks like GPCX 282 is a product of the Pennsylvania Tank Car Co. due to the position of the safety valves (opposing) and the position of the tank bands.

Regards,
Bruce 
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...>
Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2022 11:23 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery (1949)
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

Hi Bob and List Members,

Thanks Bob for the nice image

I think the tank car closest to the camera is GPCX 282, or maybe 288.

According to http://www.nakina.net/other/report/reportg.html the reporting marks GPCX belong to General Petroleum Corp on the date of this photograph

I want to say the other tank car has GATX reporting marks, but the lettering is unclear and tough to decipher, so cannot say for sure.

Claus Schlund


On 18-Jun-22 10:58, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery (1949)

A photo from the Gateway To Oklahoma History website:

https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc1551992/m1/1/?q=Loading

Description:

“Photograph of the railroad loading site at the Slayer Refining Company, 2201 Northeast 2nd Street, Oklahoma City, OK, as it appeared in May, 1949.”

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Jack Mullen
 

I think the second car is also GPCX. The resolution is poor, and the reporting marks are obscured by the tank bands, but there seems to be a vertical stroke beginning the second letter, just left of the band. So not A, but maybe P.

General Petroleum was a California producer which had been acqy by Socony (Mobil). So why are a couple of their cars in Oklahoma, at what appears to be a small facility ? What's visible doesn't look like a 

Googling "Slayer Refining Co." worked better when I spelled "Salyer" correctly. ;^).  I found d that Salyer Oil was a local Oklahoma gasoline and oil company, and Salyer Refining Co. ran a used oil refining plant in Oklahoma City producing recycled lube oil. That's now a Superfund site. I think that's the photo location. I don't see any signs of the usual tank car loading platform and piping, but the bits of piping visible could well be for unloading. I conjecture that the plant receives waste oil by tank car, and likely distributes its product in drums and cans. 

Jack Mullen


Ken Adams
 

Interesting also in that it appears to be such a small almost modellable refinery.  Jack's description of this type of 20th century industry is something we often overlook. This type of refinery could appear in any part of the country not just oil producing areas and has prototype small volumes of tank car traffic unlike the huge refineries. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Dave Parker
 

In the main, I agree with Ken, as long as "any" is broadly defined.  I've attached a 1921 list of refineries from the trade journal Oildom, as it might provide some insights about refinery locations -- at least for pre-WWII modelers.

When I first started digging into this topic several years ago, I was surprised to learn that New England actually had a half dozen or so refineries -- two in Providence, the remainder in Mass.  They were all located so as to receive crude by boat, as there no pipelines in New England.  They are long gone now, but I have never tried to track down their dates of closure, except that I know that the Fall River facility was converted to a terminal  by Shell in 1929.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Alex Schneider
 

Dave,  the list you provided is very informative but well before my modeling era. Do you have any postwar editions or any suggestions where collections of Oildom are held by libraries?

Thanks 

On Mon, Jun 20, 2022 at 11:35 AM, Dave Parker via groups.io
<spottab@...> wrote:
In the main, I agree with Ken, as long as "any" is broadly defined.  I've attached a 1921 list of refineries from the trade journal Oildom, as it might provide some insights about refinery locations -- at least for pre-WWII modelers.

When I first started digging into this topic several years ago, I was surprised to learn that New England actually had a half dozen or so refineries -- two in Providence, the remainder in Mass.  They were all located so as to receive crude by boat, as there no pipelines in New England.  They are long gone now, but I have never tried to track down their dates of closure, except that I know that the Fall River facility was converted to a terminal  by Shell in 1929.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Dave Parker
 

Sorry Alex, I don't.  The Hathi Trust collection only runs through 1923.  I do know that the magazine persisted for many years, eventually becoming the Pipeline and Gas Journal.  I also don't know if this list of refineries was published regularly.

That said, I just remembered a 1948 USDI Refinery Report that I am attaching here.  This may be more helpful to post-WWII modelers.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA