Photo: PRR Boxcar 570062 (1941)


Bruce Smith
 

Guy, 

Correct. They were changed out, probably for reasons of standardization. After all, the PRR didn't want to stock parts for two different systems, and couldn't count on other railroads to have parts either. So a non-standard system was a real problem.

I'm also not sure why you think that this is a one or the other situation. The PRR did both, convert KD to AB and upgrade existing AB.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Guy Wilber via groups.io <guycwilber@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 16, 2022 3:47 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Boxcar 570062 (1941)
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Bruce Smith wrote:

“The last batch of X29s built, post 1930, were built with experimental AB brakes with a transverse mounted reservoir. When these were upgraded to the more conventional AB brakes, by and large they retained the transverse mounting.”

What was a “more conventional” “AB” brake system?  The PRR changed out the existing system on 925 cars due to minor changes in the control valve and the later cast steel reservoir?  Seems as though the money would have been better spent towards converting “K” brakes to “AB” systems on older cars.  When was that program implemented?  

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada



Guy Wilber
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

“The last batch of X29s built, post 1930, were built with experimental AB brakes with a transverse mounted reservoir. When these were upgraded to the more conventional AB brakes, by and large they retained the transverse mounting.”

What was a “more conventional” “AB” brake system?  The PRR changed out the existing system on 925 cars due to minor changes in the control valve and the later cast steel reservoir?  Seems as though the money would have been better spent towards converting “K” brakes to “AB” systems on older cars.  When was that program implemented?  

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada



Bruce Smith
 

Guy,

An excellent question! The last batch of X29s built, post 1930, were built with experimental AB braked with a transverse mounted reservoir. When these were upgraded to the more conventional AB brakes, by and large they retained the transverse mounting. However, when the pre-1930 production cars were upgraded to AB brakes from KD, they received longitudinally mounted reservoirs. So, in reality, the longitudinal reservoir marks the car as NOT post 1930 construction (so either the 1st or 2nd batch, not the 3rd), but in combination with the other details confirms that the car is from the 1st batch. 

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Guy Wilber via groups.io <guycwilber@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 16, 2022 8:33 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Boxcar 570062 (1941)
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Bruce Smith wrote:

“Notable features include the short upper door track, 1/3 and 2/3 height door stops, car builder’s doors, plate ends, Carmer uncoupling devices, longitudinal AB reservoir
These all mark it as from the 1st production batch circa 1926."

How does a longitudinally mounted "AB” brake reservoir help mark a car built in 1926 which would not have been built with an “AB” brake system?

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada 




Guy Wilber
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

“Notable features include the short upper door track, 1/3 and 2/3 height door stops, car builder’s doors, plate ends, Carmer uncoupling devices, longitudinal AB reservoir
These all mark it as from the 1st production batch circa 1926."

How does a longitudinally mounted "AB” brake reservoir help mark a car built in 1926 which would not have been built with an “AB” brake system?

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada 




Bruce Smith
 

Bob, Folks,


Notable features include the short upper door track, 1/3 and 2/3 height door stops, car builder’s doors, plate ends, Carmer uncoupling devices, longitudinal AB reservoir

These all mark it as from the 1st production batch circa 1926.

Note the bulge in the end at the bottom right of the end – the obvious impact of an impact on the interior of that end of the car.


Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "Bob Chaparro via groups.io" <chiefbobbb@...>
Reply-To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Monday, July 11, 2022 at 3:23 PM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Boxcar 570062 (1941)

 

CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

Photo: PRR Boxcar 570062 (1941)

Photo from the Library of Congress:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/fsa/item/2017820462/

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Good view of “B” end.

I’m sure the PRR specialists can tell us more about this car.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRR Boxcar 570062 (1941)

Photo from the Library of Congress:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/fsa/item/2017820462/

Photo can be enlarged quite a bit. Good view of “B” end.

I’m sure the PRR specialists can tell us more about this car.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA