General Petroleum Tank Cars - Questions


Kenneth Montero
 

Can anyone describe the "brake wheel" mechanism on GPCX 259? How did it work?

Ken Montero

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Richard Wilkens <railsnw123@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: 07/17/2022 4:45 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] General Petroleum Tank Cars


Besides building new freight cars Pacific Car & Foundry also rebuilt numerous cars. In 1927 they cleaned and painted 5 tank cars for General Petroleum in Seattle. Here are photos of GPCX 203 and 259. Pacific Northwest Railroad Archive Collection.

Richard Wilkens


Bruce Smith
 

Ken,

That a lever handbrake, and it works just like every other lever handbrake. Lift up the lever, push or pull to tighten the attached brake chain. A ratchet mechanism allows the tension to be maintained, and to cycle the lever action.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Kenneth Montero <va661midlo@...>
Sent: Sunday, July 17, 2022 7:47 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] General Petroleum Tank Cars - Questions
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Can anyone describe the "brake wheel" mechanism on GPCX 259? How did it work?

Ken Montero

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Richard Wilkens <railsnw123@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: 07/17/2022 4:45 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] General Petroleum Tank Cars


Besides building new freight cars Pacific Car & Foundry also rebuilt numerous cars. In 1927 they cleaned and painted 5 tank cars for General Petroleum in Seattle. Here are photos of GPCX 203 and 259. Pacific Northwest Railroad Archive Collection.

Richard Wilkens


Kenneth Montero
 

Bruce,

Thank you. Since it was mounted on around post, I did not know if it had a mechanism that rotated the post, as would be the case if a brake wheel was attached.

Ken Montero

On 07/17/2022 9:07 PM Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:


Ken,

That a lever handbrake, and it works just like every other lever handbrake. Lift up the lever, push or pull to tighten the attached brake chain. A ratchet mechanism allows the tension to be maintained, and to cycle the lever action.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Kenneth Montero <va661midlo@...>
Sent: Sunday, July 17, 2022 7:47 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] General Petroleum Tank Cars - Questions

CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Can anyone describe the "brake wheel" mechanism on GPCX 259? How did it work?

Ken Montero

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Richard Wilkens <railsnw123@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: 07/17/2022 4:45 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] General Petroleum Tank Cars


Besides building new freight cars Pacific Car & Foundry also rebuilt numerous cars. In 1927 they cleaned and painted 5 tank cars for General Petroleum in Seattle. Here are photos of GPCX 203 and 259. Pacific Northwest Railroad Archive Collection.

Richard Wilkens


David
 

I believe this one is a windup shaft-style lever handbrake, using horizontal action rather than a up-down action. There is no evidence of any chain or pull link running up to the lever.

David Thompson


Charles Greene
 

Somewhat similar to the Miner brake actuator mechanism?

Chuck Greene
St. Charles, IL


Jack Mullen
 

On Mon, Jul 18, 2022 at 09:04 AM, Charles Greene wrote:
Somewhat similar to the Miner brake actuator mechanism?
Well, yes. Unfortunately, that's no clarification at all.
Miner made both the lever on vertical staff type and the lever mechanism winding the chain type. Worse yet, Miner called both "Miner Ideal Safety Hand Brake". When necessary, they were distinguished as "staff type" and "chain type", respectively.
As others have said, the brake being discussed is the staff type, in which the lever is lifted, then moved in a horizontal arc to rotate the staff, which winds chain around it's lower end.

Jack Mullen


Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Mon, Jul 18, 2022 at 10:49 AM, Jack Mullen wrote:
As others have said, the brake being discussed is the staff type, in which the lever is lifted, then moved in a horizontal arc to rotate the staff, which winds chain around it's lower end.
And, since most were patented, the designs became more and more outlandish in the effort to avoid existing patents. This one is particularly goofy, and luckily we have views from two different angles. In the broadside view of the car you can see that the handle forks above its attachment to the staff, so when lifted the mechanism at the end falls on the opposite side of the staff and engages the tapered shape at the top of the staff, which looks like it has gear teeth on it. The stubby end of this extension is a  handle for the brakeman's other hand, and possibly moves a detent to engage the teeth. Meanwhile, the staff has a ratchet at its base, equipped with a pawl to be operated by the brakeman's toe. When winding the brake down, he must've looked like he was dancing a jig!

Dennis Storzek


Mark Vinski
 

The placard holders are interesting; just a thick slab of wood. 

Mark Vinski


Jack Mullen
 

On Mon, Jul 18, 2022 at 12:42 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
This one is particularly goofy,
Goofy, yeah, but there's some purpose to it. 
I want to point out that lever - staff hand brakes need to have two ratchet and pawl mechanisms. One, seen here above the running board, keeps the staff from unwinding and releasing tension in the brake rigging, same as with horizontal wheel staff handbrakes. The pawl can be kicked to disengage it and release the brake.
The second mechanism engages the handle with the staff, allowing the handle to be ratcheted back and forth applying the brake. This one is designed so the pawl on the short end of the lever is lifted clear of the ratchet wheel when the handle drops.   I suppose there's a reason why the ratchet is tapered, but it's not apparent.
The Miner mechanism performs the same two ratchet functions in a single enclosed mechanism with a release lever.

Jack Mullen 


Dave Parker
 

On Mon, Jul 18, 2022 at 01:58 PM, Mark Vinski wrote:
The placard holders are interesting; just a thick slab of wood.
Not to a 1920s modeler -- they almost all looked like that.  The requirement for the "drop-in" metal placard holders didn't go into effect until 10-14-1932, although you will seem them on new or refurbished UTLX cars starting in about 1927.
 
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA