Photo: Breeding & Show Cattle In An Express Reefer


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Breeding & Show Cattle In An Express Reefer

Photo from the Savor Snoqualmie Valley website:

https://savorsnoqualmievalley.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/train1-1024x814.jpg

The doors are missing. The car appears to have passenger car trucks.

The photo is from an article on Carnation Farms, which states:

“The foundation herd cultivated by Carnation became breeding stock the world over. This meant that across the world, dairy farmers were able to get more milk from fewer cows leading to more stable food security, reduced labor needs (fewer cows mean fewer four-times-per-day milkings), and decreased footprint and environmental impact per gallon of milk. The legacy Carnation cows can be seen in dairy bloodlines across the world, to this day.”

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Kenneth Montero
 

Could this be a milk car temporarily converted to a stock car?

Ken Montero

On 07/31/2022 1:26 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Photo: Breeding & Show Cattle In An Express Reefer

Photo from the Savor Snoqualmie Valley website:

https://savorsnoqualmievalley.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/train1-1024x814.jpg

The doors are missing. The car appears to have passenger car trucks.

The photo is from an article on Carnation Farms, which states:

“The foundation herd cultivated by Carnation became breeding stock the world over. This meant that across the world, dairy farmers were able to get more milk from fewer cows leading to more stable food security, reduced labor needs (fewer cows mean fewer four-times-per-day milkings), and decreased footprint and environmental impact per gallon of milk. The legacy Carnation cows can be seen in dairy bloodlines across the world, to this day.”

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi Ken and Bob,


The car in question sure looks a whole lot like the car in the attached image...


Claus Schlund



On 31-Jul-22 14:48, Kenneth Montero wrote:

Could this be a milk car temporarily converted to a stock car?

Ken Montero

On 07/31/2022 1:26 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Photo: Breeding & Show Cattle In An Express Reefer

Photo from the Savor Snoqualmie Valley website:

https://savorsnoqualmievalley.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/train1-1024x814.jpg

The doors are missing. The car appears to have passenger car trucks.

The photo is from an article on Carnation Farms, which states:

“The foundation herd cultivated by Carnation became breeding stock the world over. This meant that across the world, dairy farmers were able to get more milk from fewer cows leading to more stable food security, reduced labor needs (fewer cows mean fewer four-times-per-day milkings), and decreased footprint and environmental impact per gallon of milk. The legacy Carnation cows can be seen in dairy bloodlines across the world, to this day.”

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Steve SANDIFER
 

Milk cows had some unique needs that other cows did not – milking. If you did not regularly milk a milk cow she would dry up. Therefore milk cows had to be stopped and unloaded every 10-12 hours for milking. Different railroads handled this differently. This car may have been partitioned with stalls to further protect the cows. The Santa Fe at one time had 10 50’ box cars equipped with stalls to handle animals such as polo ponies that did not require express shipment but better than normal shipment. Also horses did not like to see the world passing by, so most horse cars did not have many windows to keep the horses calm.

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Monday, August 1, 2022 12:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Breeding & Show Cattle In An Express Reefer

 

Hi Ken and Bob,

 

The car in question sure looks a whole lot like the car in the attached image...

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

On 31-Jul-22 14:48, Kenneth Montero wrote:

Could this be a milk car temporarily converted to a stock car?

 

Ken Montero

 

On 07/31/2022 1:26 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

 

 

Photo: Breeding & Show Cattle In An Express Reefer

Photo from the Savor Snoqualmie Valley website:

https://savorsnoqualmievalley.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/train1-1024x814.jpg

The doors are missing. The car appears to have passenger car trucks.

The photo is from an article on Carnation Farms, which states:

“The foundation herd cultivated by Carnation became breeding stock the world over. This meant that across the world, dairy farmers were able to get more milk from fewer cows leading to more stable food security, reduced labor needs (fewer cows mean fewer four-times-per-day milkings), and decreased footprint and environmental impact per gallon of milk. The legacy Carnation cows can be seen in dairy bloodlines across the world, to this day.”

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Charlie Vlk
 

All-

Horses today must be different.   Most all of the horse trailers / transport trucks I pass on the highway have horses looking out the window seemingly enjoying the scenery.   But I agree that horse cars had small  windows, if any, and they were mounted high, probably to avoid the possibility of a horse managing to break the glass and getting injured.

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve SANDIFER
Sent: Monday, August 1, 2022 6:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Breeding & Show Cattle In An Express Reefer

 

Milk cows had some unique needs that other cows did not – milking. If you did not regularly milk a milk cow she would dry up. Therefore milk cows had to be stopped and unloaded every 10-12 hours for milking. Different railroads handled this differently. This car may have been partitioned with stalls to further protect the cows. The Santa Fe at one time had 10 50’ box cars equipped with stalls to handle animals such as polo ponies that did not require express shipment but better than normal shipment. Also horses did not like to see the world passing by, so most horse cars did not have many windows to keep the horses calm.

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Monday, August 1, 2022 12:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Breeding & Show Cattle In An Express Reefer

 

Hi Ken and Bob,

 

The car in question sure looks a whole lot like the car in the attached image...

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

On 31-Jul-22 14:48, Kenneth Montero wrote:

Could this be a milk car temporarily converted to a stock car?

 

Ken Montero

 

On 07/31/2022 1:26 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

 

 

Photo: Breeding & Show Cattle In An Express Reefer

Photo from the Savor Snoqualmie Valley website:

https://savorsnoqualmievalley.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/train1-1024x814.jpg

The doors are missing. The car appears to have passenger car trucks.

The photo is from an article on Carnation Farms, which states:

“The foundation herd cultivated by Carnation became breeding stock the world over. This meant that across the world, dairy farmers were able to get more milk from fewer cows leading to more stable food security, reduced labor needs (fewer cows mean fewer four-times-per-day milkings), and decreased footprint and environmental impact per gallon of milk. The legacy Carnation cows can be seen in dairy bloodlines across the world, to this day.”

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


reubeft
 

My Sanborn maps shown a spur off the New Orleans Terminal ( SR sub.). The New Orleans Fairgrounds were only 3-4 blocks from this spur. Haven't been able to find any pics.  Also this was a seasonal operation. 
The Orleans-Kenner electric line also had a spur going to a track located along the Mississippi River in Jefferson Parish from New Orleans.  Was told it handled horses and ran specials from N.O. to the tracks.  Later the horse track became a subdivision know has Azalea Gardens.  The oval track became the main road.  Can clearly be seen in aerial pics even today.
Reuben @ Poplarville, Ms


Jack Mullen
 

On Mon, Aug 1, 2022 at 10:10 AM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) wrote:
The car in question sure looks a whole lot like the car in the attached image...
Except that the car in the second photo lacks ice hatches.
Of course changes may have been made in the 25 years between the two photos.

Jack Mullen


Paul Krueger
 

Jack, it's one of eleven from the original 50 express reefers that had their bunks removed and reclassified as express and dairy cars. I'm pretty sure the one in the first photo is from the same group of cars. 

These 50 cars were built at the Milwaukee Shops in 1911. The equipment diagram shows "assigned for fish loading" on the side of the car.

Paul Krueger
Seattle, WA


Bill Parks
 

On Mon, Aug 1, 2022 at 07:06 PM, Steve SANDIFER wrote:
The Santa Fe at one time had 10 50’ box cars equipped with stalls to handle animals such as polo ponies that did not require express shipment but better than normal shipment
The Seaboard Airline had specially built HW cars for transporting race horses between New York and Florida.  As I remember, they were built in the mid 1920s, and were about 75 ft. long, and had several doors on each side for loading/unloading of the horses.  They had stalls for the horses, along with watering and feeding systems, and space for handlers to ride.  I think they were still in service when SAL and ACL merged into SCL.
 
--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Thomas Evans
 

The Santa Fe also had quite a number of horse cars.
They were long with 3 doors on each side plus a large door in one end.
I don't know the interior arrangement, but I remember seeing them frequently in service on their transcontinental trains when I was young, probably not in horse service.

Tom E.


Bruce Hendrick
 

Santa Fe’s #1992 Horse Express car is on public display as part of “Rail Giants” collection at the LA County Fairgrounds (aka Fairplex) in Pomona. The free display is open during the annual fair and one weekend a month. 

The interior of #1992 may be entered and shows moveable dividers to reconfigure the stalls, along with a sink, toilet, and bunk for the horseman. 

Bruce Hendrick 


Jeffrey White
 

The IC had a few horse cars. They were converted baggage cars.  Here is the diagram sheet showing the moveable stalls and troughs:

Jeff White

Alma IL


On 8/4/2022 10:58 AM, Bruce Hendrick wrote:

Santa Fe’s #1992 Horse Express car is on public display as part of “Rail Giants” collection at the LA County Fairgrounds (aka Fairplex) in Pomona. The free display is open during the annual fair and one weekend a month. 

The interior of #1992 may be entered and shows moveable dividers to reconfigure the stalls, along with a sink, toilet, and bunk for the horseman. 

Bruce Hendrick