CA vegetables sent east


Tim O'Connor
 

C'mon Tony, we know there's just regular and high-test, and all of the others are just
a blend of those two.¬† ūüėā


Alex Schneider wrote:

Why were multi tank cars used to transport wine? Wasn't it all going to the same bottling plant?
Next time you’re in a wine store, please note that there are different kinds of wine.

Tony Thompson
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Tony Thompson
 

Alex Schneider wrote:

Why were multi tank cars used to transport wine? Wasn't it all going to the same bottling plant?
Next time you’re in a wine store, please note that there are different kinds of wine.

Tony Thompson
tony@...


Alex Schneider
 

Why were multi tank cars used to transport wine? Wasn't it all going to the same bottling plant?

Alex Schneider


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Robert G P <bobgp5109@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2023 12:09:04 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] CA vegetables sent east
 
Was not expecting this much info! Thanks!

-Rob

On Mon, Jan 2, 2023 at 8:49 PM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Thanks Jeff, wow!

On 1/2/2023 4:54 PM, Jeffrey White wrote:

The following is from Organization and Traffic on the Illinois Central System, published by the IC in 1938 and the data is from 1936 and 1937:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Robert G P
 

Was not expecting this much info! Thanks!

-Rob

On Mon, Jan 2, 2023 at 8:49 PM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Thanks Jeff, wow!

On 1/2/2023 4:54 PM, Jeffrey White wrote:

The following is from Organization and Traffic on the Illinois Central System, published by the IC in 1938 and the data is from 1936 and 1937:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


Thanks Jeff, wow!

On 1/2/2023 4:54 PM, Jeffrey White wrote:

The following is from Organization and Traffic on the Illinois Central System, published by the IC in 1938 and the data is from 1936 and 1937:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Bob Chaparro
 

"The juice grape movement alone amounted to 35,800 cars and were used largely for the manufacture of wine."

Wow. This was huge! Some photos that may have appeared here before.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Gary Ray
 

Very interesting.  Thanks for sharing.  Hope you were able to scan it in rather than type it.

Gary Ray

On 1/2/2023 3:54 PM, Jeffrey White wrote:


The following is from Organization and Traffic on the Illinois Central System, published by the IC in 1938 and the data is from 1936 and 1937:

"The production of green fruits and vegetables has continued to increase annually to such an extent that, exclusive of bananas moving by rail for the ten calendar years 1924 to 1933 inclusive in the United States, it has averaged 970,000 cars. Considerable of this tonnage consists of numerous seasonal commodities, originating in the principal producing sections of the country as referred to more specifically later. Certain commodities move practically the entire twelve months pf the year. The Illinois Central handled 60,281 cars in 1937, exclusive of bananas, which represented 3.4% of all carload freight handled and accounted for 4.3 per cent of the total system freight revenue.

The majority of our fruits and vegetables originate in off-line territories where we are an intermediate carrier.  The principal producing territories from a standpoint of importance to our line are the states of California, Florida, Washington, Texas, Idaho, Minnesota, North Dakota, Colorado, Georgia, Michigan, Oregon, Wisconsin and several others of lesser importance. In fact during 1936 our deliveries at the Chicago Produce Terminal had their origin in 30 states. Green fruits and vegetables originating on the Illinois Central System are from the states of Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Illinois and Kentucky. To present a concrete idea as to the varieties and volume of green fruits and vegetables which originate in various states, it is necessary to quote briefly some statistics.

California. Production of fruits and vegetables in California is of greater volume than in any other state of the Union. The total aggregating in round figures, 247,000 cars for the year 1934 which if the last year government statistics are available.  This enormous tonnage consisted of of 74,300 cars of citrus (oranges, lemons and grapefruit), 54,300 cars deciduous (grapes, apples, peaches, pears, prunes, plums, apricots, nectarines, etc).  15,300 cars of melons of various varieties, principally cantaloupes, persians, honey dews, etc. The cantaloupes originate principally in the Imperial Valley, while the persians, honey dews, honey balls, etc., originate in Central California. There were 47,000 cars of potatoes, lettuce, carrots, romaine, asparagus, celery, etc., and there were 56,600 cars of other green fruits and vegetables not specifically referred to previously. The juice grape movement alone amounted to 35,800 cars and were used largely for the manufacture of wine.

Since the repeal of the prohibition law, the juice grape movement has been gradually decreasing and a larger proportion of the juice grape production in California is being utilized by the wineries, thus materially affecting the car lot volume of juice grapes formerly handled by the railroads, due to the fact that it requires six carloads of juice grapes to produce a tank car of wine. California perishables are very widely distributed throughout the United States as well as in Canada.

Oranges and lemons originate in southern California, within 125 miles of Los Angeles, juice grapes originate largely in territory around Fresno, while table grapes come from the central portion of California in the Stockton and Lodi districts. Deciduous fruits are produced in central and northern California, while vegetables are principally produced in the central portions of the state, and along the west coast and in the Imperial Valley.

The Illinois Central receives a considerable amount of traffic originating in California which comes to our lines at Council Bluffs, particularly destined to Chicago, eastern and Canadian markets. There is also movement through the Shreveport, Memphis and St Louis gateways but of lesser volume.

Florida. Florida is next in importance in point of production. 101,600 cars originated there in 1934. This tonnage consisted of 55,330 cars of citrus (oranges, lemons, limes and tangerines); 39,000 cars of vegetables, principally beans, cabbage, celery, peppers, potatoes, tomatoes and mixed vegetables; 3,862 cars of watermelons and miscellaneous vegetables made up the balance of tonnage to approximate the total. Florida shipments to a large extent move to eastern seaboard and Central Freight Association territory, unavailable to our lines, however there is a fair movement destined to the territory in which we participate. This traffic comes to us through the Martin, Tenn, Evansville, Ind, and Birmingham, Ala., gateways. We also participate in the revenue on cars moving through Cincinnati, Ohio, via the Big Four which is handled under a car haul arrangement from Kankakee to Chicago.

Washington. This state originated 51,300 cars in 1934, of which 39,400 were deciduous fruits (apples, peaches and pears); 10,400 cars vegetables (principally potatoes, peas, onions, lettuce, asparagus and mixed vegetables). The remaining 1,480 cars comprise miscellaneous items. The important movement from this territory was apples; there were 31,075 cars shipped during that year, in addition to movement of 4,634 cars of pears. We participate in a haul on a large portion of the apples and pears consigned to Chicago for auction; we also obtain a haul on a fair volume of the other various commodities originating in that state which is routed in connection with the M.&St.L. via the Twin Cities and our line at Albert Lea, Minn., or in connection with Union Pacific via Council Bluffs and our line.

Minnesota and North Dakota. The majority of the perishables grown in this territory are produced in the Red River Valley, a district about 150 miles in length and 50 miles wide, north of Moorhead, Minn., extending to the Canadian border. There is also a very productive section for producing potatoes, cabbage and onions, located south and east of Minneapolis, known as the Hollandale district. This district was brought into production by draining an old lake. This territory as a whole produced a movement of 19,800 cars, in 1934. The principal product was potatoes, although there were 640 cars of cabbage, 264 cars of onions and 485 cars of rutabagas shipped from the state of Minnesota.

Considerable traffic originating in this territory is destined to points available to our line. The past several seasons a representative has been located at Grand Forks N.D., specializing in the solicitation of these commodities, with good results.  Traffic with which we are favored comes to us either through the M. & St. L. at Albert Lea or our connections at Chicago. Perishables reaching us at Chicago originate largely at the Hollandale district, which is served jointly by tracks of the C.M. St. P. & P. and the Rock Island.  Those lines obtain their haul to Chicago in most cases. Normal seasons when the yield is heavy in the Red River Valley and the quality of potatoes is good, markets and territories which the Illinois Central serve to an advantage draw a considerable tonnage from that district.

Colorado.  Perishables originating in Colorado and Nebraska, under direct supervision of our Denver office amounted to 25,000 cars for year 1934 of which 21,400 were classified under the heading of vegetables.  Sixty per cent of these cars were potatoes. Deciduous fruits (apples, peaches) comprised 2,575 cars and melons, 920. A large portion of this traffic either originates on lines permitting longer haul and more remunerative revenue to them than working with us, or the traffic is destined to territory which we do not serve advantageously; however there is movement to points we can and do handle through our Council Bluffs, St. Louis or Memphis gateways.  Traffic originating on the C.B.&Q. in Nebraska, destined to Chicago will naturally be controlled for the most part by that road. Likewise melons originating in Eastern Colorado on the Santa fe or Missouri Pacific present a similar situation. By the inauguration of train ED-10, Sept. 15, 1936, in connection with Union Pacific RO train from Denver and the augmenting of our force to particularly concentrate on the solicitation of fruits and vegetables from the San Luis Valley, several hundred cars of perishables were secured which we would not otherwise have handled.

Georgia. The fruit and vegetable production of Georgia in 1934 was 18,600 cars of which 8,200 were peaches, 9000 watermelons. Various vegetables made up the remaining 1,460 cars. The major portion of Georgia perishables moved to northern and eastern destinations, unavailable to our line. However, there is always a certain volume, particularly watermelons and peaches moving to Chicago and other mid-western points. We handle a good share of such shipments through our Martin, Tenn., Evansville, Ind., or Birmingham, Ala., gateways. We, also, participate in the revenue on shipments handled by the Big Four via Cincinnati, Kankakee and our line destined to Chicago or points beyond.

Michigan.  Carload shipments from Michigan during 1934 were 17,600 cars of which 2,240 were deciduous (apples, pears, peaches, plums etc.); 14,700 vegetables, 550 cars grapes, principally  Concord table grapes and 128 cars of miscellaneous commodities. The heaviest production was potatoes with 7,700 cars and next, onions with 5800 cars. Ordinarily, outside of a few miscellaneous cars we do not participate in a very large amount of Michigan perishables. However, the particular year in question, owing to a shortage of potatoes in other territories, the Illinois Central handled several hundred cars of potatoes from Michigan to St. Louis, also to destinations in Illinois, as well as cities on and south of the Ohio River. A great deal of Michigan produce is handled through the St. Joseph-Benton Harbor fruit and vegetable market.  At least 95% of it is moved by truck.  Trucks bring vegetables and fruits from other territories to this market to sell and take back loads of the various commodities sold on the St. Joseph-Benton Harbor market.  A large percentage of the Michigan onions are disposed of in Central Freight Association and eastern territory, as well as points south of the Ohio River via Cincinnati and Louisville. This is also the case with reference to potatoes, when there is not a shortage in other territories. The coal mining districts of Eastern Kentucky and western Virginia ordinarily draw heavily on Michigan for their fruit and vegetable products.

Oregon.  Deciduous fruits comprised 7,200 cars; vegetables, 9,050; miscellaneous items, 410 cars of 1934 production, totaling 16,660 cars. Of this total there were 3,100 cars of apples, 3700 cars of pears, 1,100 cars of plums and prunes, 240 cars of cherries, while of the vegetables, potatoes accounted for 5,500 cars of the total; onions 1,450, cauliflower, 1,050, celery 572 and lettuce 185. Much of this tonnage except potatoes is destined to eastern territory in which we participate through the Twin Cities of Albert Leas gateway, Normally the movement of Oregon potatoes into our territory is limited, owning to the demand on the western coast and the territory intermediate to our lines. We also handle some Oregon traffic in connection with the Union Pacific through Council Bluffs.

Wisconsin.  The fresh fruit and vegetable production in 1934 was 18,300 cars of which 10,700 were potatoes, 6,900 cabbage, 240 cars of turnips and rutabagas. There were also 175 cars of cranberries and the balance were miscellaneous fruit and vegetables. Where Wisconsin has a heavy yield and good quality of potatoes and onions we handle a large volume from Chicago because considerable of these items are consumed in the territory we serve to advantage. Wisconsin cranberries, although limited in quantity are destined to points throughout the mid-west and such cars that we secure are destined to St. Louis or points beyond that junction. Cranberries move in volume from the New Jersey or Cape Cod producing districts. We handle a limited number of cars moving from these sections. Cranberries are largely controlled by the American Cranberry Exchange of New York City.

Alabama. Production of fruits and vegetables in 1934 totaled 8,950 cars of which 5,350 were vegetables, 970 watermelons, 450 cars of strawberries and 120 cars of Satsuma oranges.  Of the vegetables, 4,500 cars were potatoes, 1,265 cabbage, 587 cucumbers, 465 green corn. A considerable portion of this traffic we handle under normal marketing conditions moved to points in the territory served by our line.  Some seasons markets are more favorable to points north of the Ohio River via Louisville and Cincinnati, in Central Freight Association territory and east than to mid-western markets and under such conditions the trend of traffic in connection with the Illinois Central is more or less affected.  We receive a large proportion of the watermelons destined to Chicago. Strawberries from southern Alabama move practically altogether by express. Under normal conditions our line handles six to eight hundred cars of fruits and vegetables annually originated in southern Alabama.

Missouri.  The volume of fruits and vegetables produced in Missouri in 1934 totaled 4,085 cars, the distribution being 526 cars of vegetables, 210 cars of fruits, 90 cars of grapes, 614 cars of strawberries and 2,620 cars of watermelons.  At first glance Missouri does not appear as of any importance to our line. It is, however, of some importance to us as a producer of freight revenue on a volume movement of watermelons grown in the southeastern section of the state and which are sold on Chicago markets, as well as other points in Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota.  This traffic comes to our line at East St Louis.

Missouri is a heavy producer of horse radish roots. This commodity is grown principally in the immediate vicinity of St. Louis.  A number of straight cars are handled by our line annually to eastern destinations.  With a good market, this is a very profitable crop and the past season has been favorable to the farmer. This product sold for $14.00 per barrel of 100 lbs. and the normal yield is from fifty to sixty barrels per acre. Strawberries are produced in the Monett district, the extreme southwest section of the state and the movement is largely by express.

Arizona.  Arizona produced 10,490 cars during the year 1934 of which 6,700 cars were vegetables; 1,300, citrus (grapefruit and oranges); 2,000 melons; and 27, grapes. This appears to be a considerable tonnage from which we should obtain a fair amount of traffic.  However, shipments are destined to Central Freight Association territory and other eastern markets where schedules permit originating lines to handle business to Chicago or East St. Louis with direct connection with eastern lines making it difficult for us to obtain but little of it.  We can and do handle a certain percent of traffic destined to Chicago or points beyond, such as Milwaukee, Detroit or Canadian destinations where we compete with other lines from point of service. The citrus movement from this state is slowly but gradually expanding each year as younger trees come into production.

Mississippi.  Total production in 1934 was 7,294 cars, of which 6,800 cars were vegetables; 266, watermelons; 73, strawberries; 126, oranges; and 28, fruit.  Mississippi is a very important producing section for us as well as originate a large portion of the vegetables produced in the states as well as an  increasing volume of watermelons the last three years , obtaining our long haul in majority of instances.  The result is a greater revenue than if the business originated on a connecting line. Mississippi has for many years been a heavy producer of tomatoes, beans, cabbage, peas, peppers, mixed cars of vegetables and the state is nationally known particularly as a tomato producing section. Watermelons were a new development and revenue producer for our line in 1934 and have since expanded through persistent and successful efforts of our Agricultural Department. The state produced over 700 cars of melons in 1936. Oranges and strawberries originate in territory located on other lines and only a limited amount is destined to points we can handle to advantage.  Strawberries move largely by express.

Louisiana.  The fruits and vegetables produced in Louisiana in 1934 amounted to a total of 11,700 cars, of which 8,700 were vegetables, 150 citrus, 2,800 strawberries and a few miscellaneous cars of fruits and vegetables.  Approximately 50% of total tonnage produced in Louisiana originated on our line and we also obtained haul on a good portion of the other 50%.  During the year mentioned there were 770 cars of beans, 1,100 cars of cabbage, 1,300 cars of mixed vegetables, 200 cars of onions, 196 cars peppers, 3,000 cars potatoes, 1,700 cars of sweet potatoes and 325 cars of tomatoes, these being the principal volume vegetables. Oranges are grown on the Gulf Coast south of New Orleans and practically all are consumed in the city of New Orleans. Strawberries are produced in the so-called Hammond District which includes a number of stations on our line and the L.&A. Ry. within a radius 35 miles of Hammond.  This is the largest producing section of strawberries in the world.  Approximately 99% of this traffic moves by express. The Hammond-Ponchatoula district is gradually expanding through the activities of our Agricultural Department in the production of beans, peppers and cucumbers.  Louisiana, as a whole, is a very productive territory for our railroad.

Tennessee.  Tennessee produced 6,400 cars of fruits and vegetables in 1934, of which 2,650 were vegetables; 2,500 fruits; 1,200 strawberries; 74, miscellaneous.  Tomatoes totaled 1,700 cars; sweet potatoes, 1,300; cabbage, 850; and a limited number of cars of cucumbers and mixed vegetables.  The 770 cars of peaches and 1,200 cars of strawberries originated in east Tennessee. The major portion of all fruits and vegetables originate in central and western parts of Tennessee. This traffic is both local and competitive to lines serving Tennessee and we can and do handle a portion of this traffic originating on connecting lines and moving to territory which we serve to advantage on a competitive basis.  The 400 cars Irish potatoes moved largely through Cincinnati and Louisville thus making our opportunity for handling these potatoes unfavorable. Strawberries in Tennessee moved both via express and freight. Some shippers use freight equipment where the berries can reach markets the next or not later than second morning from loading point.

Illinois. The production of fruits and vegetables in Illinois in 1934 was 2,560 cars, classified as follows: fruit, 1,690; vegetables, 590; strawberries, 140; watermelons, 97; grapes, 30; with a few miscellaneous cars.  This particular year there was a good crop of pears consisting of 872 cars, also 318 cars of peaches and 498 cars of apples.  A considerable portion of the Illinois fruits with the exception of apples are produced in territory tributary to our line. The volume varies from one season to another according to weather and growing conditions.  About every third season Illinois produces and average crop of peaches, which is approximately 2,000 cars.  Illinois vegetables are grown largely in the southern section of the state on or in proximity of our line between Carbondale and Cairo, numerous varieties being produced and shipped in straight or mixed cars.  We have keen competition with trucks on our fruits and vegetables in that particular section of the state. This will be discussed in further detail later.  About 95% of the strawberries originate along and are handled by our line.  The 97 cars of watermelons originated on other lines.

Kentucky.  There were 1,285 cars shipped from Kentucky in 1934 of which 979 were strawberries; 156 sweet potatoes; 40, peaches; and miscellaneous cars of fruits and various vegetables.  Our line originated 641 cars of the 979 cars of strawberries. We also handled practically all of the 200 cars originating on the N.C.&St. L. at Benton Kentucky.  All except four cars of the sweet potatoes originated on our line.  We also originated the 40 cars of peaches at Paducah, Kentucky. Our line therefore secured a haul on a large percentage of the perishables moving from Kentucky in 1934."


The chapter goes on to discuss truck competition, LCL refrigerator service and icing of refrigerator cars.

Jeff White

Alma IL

ch


Jeffrey White
 


The following is from Organization and Traffic on the Illinois Central System, published by the IC in 1938 and the data is from 1936 and 1937:

"The production of green fruits and vegetables has continued to increase annually to such an extent that, exclusive of bananas moving by rail for the ten calendar years 1924 to 1933 inclusive in the United States, it has averaged 970,000 cars. Considerable of this tonnage consists of numerous seasonal commodities, originating in the principal producing sections of the country as referred to more specifically later. Certain commodities move practically the entire twelve months pf the year. The Illinois Central handled 60,281 cars in 1937, exclusive of bananas, which represented 3.4% of all carload freight handled and accounted for 4.3 per cent of the total system freight revenue.

The majority of our fruits and vegetables originate in off-line territories where we are an intermediate carrier.  The principal producing territories from a standpoint of importance to our line are the states of California, Florida, Washington, Texas, Idaho, Minnesota, North Dakota, Colorado, Georgia, Michigan, Oregon, Wisconsin and several others of lesser importance. In fact during 1936 our deliveries at the Chicago Produce Terminal had their origin in 30 states. Green fruits and vegetables originating on the Illinois Central System are from the states of Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Illinois and Kentucky. To present a concrete idea as to the varieties and volume of green fruits and vegetables which originate in various states, it is necessary to quote briefly some statistics.

California. Production of fruits and vegetables in California is of greater volume than in any other state of the Union. The total aggregating in round figures, 247,000 cars for the year 1934 which if the last year government statistics are available.  This enormous tonnage consisted of of 74,300 cars of citrus (oranges, lemons and grapefruit), 54,300 cars deciduous (grapes, apples, peaches, pears, prunes, plums, apricots, nectarines, etc).  15,300 cars of melons of various varieties, principally cantaloupes, persians, honey dews, etc. The cantaloupes originate principally in the Imperial Valley, while the persians, honey dews, honey balls, etc., originate in Central California. There were 47,000 cars of potatoes, lettuce, carrots, romaine, asparagus, celery, etc., and there were 56,600 cars of other green fruits and vegetables not specifically referred to previously. The juice grape movement alone amounted to 35,800 cars and were used largely for the manufacture of wine.

Since the repeal of the prohibition law, the juice grape movement has been gradually decreasing and a larger proportion of the juice grape production in California is being utilized by the wineries, thus materially affecting the car lot volume of juice grapes formerly handled by the railroads, due to the fact that it requires six carloads of juice grapes to produce a tank car of wine. California perishables are very widely distributed throughout the United States as well as in Canada.

Oranges and lemons originate in southern California, within 125 miles of Los Angeles, juice grapes originate largely in territory around Fresno, while table grapes come from the central portion of California in the Stockton and Lodi districts. Deciduous fruits are produced in central and northern California, while vegetables are principally produced in the central portions of the state, and along the west coast and in the Imperial Valley.

The Illinois Central receives a considerable amount of traffic originating in California which comes to our lines at Council Bluffs, particularly destined to Chicago, eastern and Canadian markets. There is also movement through the Shreveport, Memphis and St Louis gateways but of lesser volume.

Florida. Florida is next in importance in point of production. 101,600 cars originated there in 1934. This tonnage consisted of 55,330 cars of citrus (oranges, lemons, limes and tangerines); 39,000 cars of vegetables, principally beans, cabbage, celery, peppers, potatoes, tomatoes and mixed vegetables; 3,862 cars of watermelons and miscellaneous vegetables made up the balance of tonnage to approximate the total. Florida shipments to a large extent move to eastern seaboard and Central Freight Association territory, unavailable to our lines, however there is a fair movement destined to the territory in which we participate. This traffic comes to us through the Martin, Tenn, Evansville, Ind, and Birmingham, Ala., gateways. We also participate in the revenue on cars moving through Cincinnati, Ohio, via the Big Four which is handled under a car haul arrangement from Kankakee to Chicago.

Washington. This state originated 51,300 cars in 1934, of which 39,400 were deciduous fruits (apples, peaches and pears); 10,400 cars vegetables (principally potatoes, peas, onions, lettuce, asparagus and mixed vegetables). The remaining 1,480 cars comprise miscellaneous items. The important movement from this territory was apples; there were 31,075 cars shipped during that year, in addition to movement of 4,634 cars of pears. We participate in a haul on a large portion of the apples and pears consigned to Chicago for auction; we also obtain a haul on a fair volume of the other various commodities originating in that state which is routed in connection with the M.&St.L. via the Twin Cities and our line at Albert Lea, Minn., or in connection with Union Pacific via Council Bluffs and our line.

Minnesota and North Dakota. The majority of the perishables grown in this territory are produced in the Red River Valley, a district about 150 miles in length and 50 miles wide, north of Moorhead, Minn., extending to the Canadian border. There is also a very productive section for producing potatoes, cabbage and onions, located south and east of Minneapolis, known as the Hollandale district. This district was brought into production by draining an old lake. This territory as a whole produced a movement of 19,800 cars, in 1934. The principal product was potatoes, although there were 640 cars of cabbage, 264 cars of onions and 485 cars of rutabagas shipped from the state of Minnesota.

Considerable traffic originating in this territory is destined to points available to our line. The past several seasons a representative has been located at Grand Forks N.D., specializing in the solicitation of these commodities, with good results.  Traffic with which we are favored comes to us either through the M. & St. L. at Albert Lea or our connections at Chicago. Perishables reaching us at Chicago originate largely at the Hollandale district, which is served jointly by tracks of the C.M. St. P. & P. and the Rock Island.  Those lines obtain their haul to Chicago in most cases. Normal seasons when the yield is heavy in the Red River Valley and the quality of potatoes is good, markets and territories which the Illinois Central serve to an advantage draw a considerable tonnage from that district.

Colorado.  Perishables originating in Colorado and Nebraska, under direct supervision of our Denver office amounted to 25,000 cars for year 1934 of which 21,400 were classified under the heading of vegetables.  Sixty per cent of these cars were potatoes. Deciduous fruits (apples, peaches) comprised 2,575 cars and melons, 920. A large portion of this traffic either originates on lines permitting longer haul and more remunerative revenue to them than working with us, or the traffic is destined to territory which we do not serve advantageously; however there is movement to points we can and do handle through our Council Bluffs, St. Louis or Memphis gateways.  Traffic originating on the C.B.&Q. in Nebraska, destined to Chicago will naturally be controlled for the most part by that road. Likewise melons originating in Eastern Colorado on the Santa fe or Missouri Pacific present a similar situation. By the inauguration of train ED-10, Sept. 15, 1936, in connection with Union Pacific RO train from Denver and the augmenting of our force to particularly concentrate on the solicitation of fruits and vegetables from the San Luis Valley, several hundred cars of perishables were secured which we would not otherwise have handled.

Georgia. The fruit and vegetable production of Georgia in 1934 was 18,600 cars of which 8,200 were peaches, 9000 watermelons. Various vegetables made up the remaining 1,460 cars. The major portion of Georgia perishables moved to northern and eastern destinations, unavailable to our line. However, there is always a certain volume, particularly watermelons and peaches moving to Chicago and other mid-western points. We handle a good share of such shipments through our Martin, Tenn., Evansville, Ind., or Birmingham, Ala., gateways. We, also, participate in the revenue on shipments handled by the Big Four via Cincinnati, Kankakee and our line destined to Chicago or points beyond.

Michigan.  Carload shipments from Michigan during 1934 were 17,600 cars of which 2,240 were deciduous (apples, pears, peaches, plums etc.); 14,700 vegetables, 550 cars grapes, principally  Concord table grapes and 128 cars of miscellaneous commodities. The heaviest production was potatoes with 7,700 cars and next, onions with 5800 cars. Ordinarily, outside of a few miscellaneous cars we do not participate in a very large amount of Michigan perishables. However, the particular year in question, owing to a shortage of potatoes in other territories, the Illinois Central handled several hundred cars of potatoes from Michigan to St. Louis, also to destinations in Illinois, as well as cities on and south of the Ohio River. A great deal of Michigan produce is handled through the St. Joseph-Benton Harbor fruit and vegetable market.  At least 95% of it is moved by truck.  Trucks bring vegetables and fruits from other territories to this market to sell and take back loads of the various commodities sold on the St. Joseph-Benton Harbor market.  A large percentage of the Michigan onions are disposed of in Central Freight Association and eastern territory, as well as points south of the Ohio River via Cincinnati and Louisville. This is also the case with reference to potatoes, when there is not a shortage in other territories. The coal mining districts of Eastern Kentucky and western Virginia ordinarily draw heavily on Michigan for their fruit and vegetable products.

Oregon.  Deciduous fruits comprised 7,200 cars; vegetables, 9,050; miscellaneous items, 410 cars of 1934 production, totaling 16,660 cars. Of this total there were 3,100 cars of apples, 3700 cars of pears, 1,100 cars of plums and prunes, 240 cars of cherries, while of the vegetables, potatoes accounted for 5,500 cars of the total; onions 1,450, cauliflower, 1,050, celery 572 and lettuce 185. Much of this tonnage except potatoes is destined to eastern territory in which we participate through the Twin Cities of Albert Leas gateway, Normally the movement of Oregon potatoes into our territory is limited, owning to the demand on the western coast and the territory intermediate to our lines. We also handle some Oregon traffic in connection with the Union Pacific through Council Bluffs.

Wisconsin.  The fresh fruit and vegetable production in 1934 was 18,300 cars of which 10,700 were potatoes, 6,900 cabbage, 240 cars of turnips and rutabagas. There were also 175 cars of cranberries and the balance were miscellaneous fruit and vegetables. Where Wisconsin has a heavy yield and good quality of potatoes and onions we handle a large volume from Chicago because considerable of these items are consumed in the territory we serve to advantage. Wisconsin cranberries, although limited in quantity are destined to points throughout the mid-west and such cars that we secure are destined to St. Louis or points beyond that junction. Cranberries move in volume from the New Jersey or Cape Cod producing districts. We handle a limited number of cars moving from these sections. Cranberries are largely controlled by the American Cranberry Exchange of New York City.

Alabama. Production of fruits and vegetables in 1934 totaled 8,950 cars of which 5,350 were vegetables, 970 watermelons, 450 cars of strawberries and 120 cars of Satsuma oranges.  Of the vegetables, 4,500 cars were potatoes, 1,265 cabbage, 587 cucumbers, 465 green corn. A considerable portion of this traffic we handle under normal marketing conditions moved to points in the territory served by our line.  Some seasons markets are more favorable to points north of the Ohio River via Louisville and Cincinnati, in Central Freight Association territory and east than to mid-western markets and under such conditions the trend of traffic in connection with the Illinois Central is more or less affected.  We receive a large proportion of the watermelons destined to Chicago. Strawberries from southern Alabama move practically altogether by express. Under normal conditions our line handles six to eight hundred cars of fruits and vegetables annually originated in southern Alabama.

Missouri.  The volume of fruits and vegetables produced in Missouri in 1934 totaled 4,085 cars, the distribution being 526 cars of vegetables, 210 cars of fruits, 90 cars of grapes, 614 cars of strawberries and 2,620 cars of watermelons.  At first glance Missouri does not appear as of any importance to our line. It is, however, of some importance to us as a producer of freight revenue on a volume movement of watermelons grown in the southeastern section of the state and which are sold on Chicago markets, as well as other points in Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota.  This traffic comes to our line at East St Louis.

Missouri is a heavy producer of horse radish roots. This commodity is grown principally in the immediate vicinity of St. Louis.  A number of straight cars are handled by our line annually to eastern destinations.  With a good market, this is a very profitable crop and the past season has been favorable to the farmer. This product sold for $14.00 per barrel of 100 lbs. and the normal yield is from fifty to sixty barrels per acre. Strawberries are produced in the Monett district, the extreme southwest section of the state and the movement is largely by express.

Arizona.  Arizona produced 10,490 cars during the year 1934 of which 6,700 cars were vegetables; 1,300, citrus (grapefruit and oranges); 2,000 melons; and 27, grapes. This appears to be a considerable tonnage from which we should obtain a fair amount of traffic.  However, shipments are destined to Central Freight Association territory and other eastern markets where schedules permit originating lines to handle business to Chicago or East St. Louis with direct connection with eastern lines making it difficult for us to obtain but little of it.  We can and do handle a certain percent of traffic destined to Chicago or points beyond, such as Milwaukee, Detroit or Canadian destinations where we compete with other lines from point of service. The citrus movement from this state is slowly but gradually expanding each year as younger trees come into production.

Mississippi.  Total production in 1934 was 7,294 cars, of which 6,800 cars were vegetables; 266, watermelons; 73, strawberries; 126, oranges; and 28, fruit.  Mississippi is a very important producing section for us as well as originate a large portion of the vegetables produced in the states as well as an  increasing volume of watermelons the last three years , obtaining our long haul in majority of instances.  The result is a greater revenue than if the business originated on a connecting line. Mississippi has for many years been a heavy producer of tomatoes, beans, cabbage, peas, peppers, mixed cars of vegetables and the state is nationally known particularly as a tomato producing section. Watermelons were a new development and revenue producer for our line in 1934 and have since expanded through persistent and successful efforts of our Agricultural Department. The state produced over 700 cars of melons in 1936. Oranges and strawberries originate in territory located on other lines and only a limited amount is destined to points we can handle to advantage.  Strawberries move largely by express.

Louisiana.  The fruits and vegetables produced in Louisiana in 1934 amounted to a total of 11,700 cars, of which 8,700 were vegetables, 150 citrus, 2,800 strawberries and a few miscellaneous cars of fruits and vegetables.  Approximately 50% of total tonnage produced in Louisiana originated on our line and we also obtained haul on a good portion of the other 50%.  During the year mentioned there were 770 cars of beans, 1,100 cars of cabbage, 1,300 cars of mixed vegetables, 200 cars of onions, 196 cars peppers, 3,000 cars potatoes, 1,700 cars of sweet potatoes and 325 cars of tomatoes, these being the principal volume vegetables. Oranges are grown on the Gulf Coast south of New Orleans and practically all are consumed in the city of New Orleans. Strawberries are produced in the so-called Hammond District which includes a number of stations on our line and the L.&A. Ry. within a radius 35 miles of Hammond.  This is the largest producing section of strawberries in the world.  Approximately 99% of this traffic moves by express. The Hammond-Ponchatoula district is gradually expanding through the activities of our Agricultural Department in the production of beans, peppers and cucumbers.  Louisiana, as a whole, is a very productive territory for our railroad.

Tennessee.  Tennessee produced 6,400 cars of fruits and vegetables in 1934, of which 2,650 were vegetables; 2,500 fruits; 1,200 strawberries; 74, miscellaneous.  Tomatoes totaled 1,700 cars; sweet potatoes, 1,300; cabbage, 850; and a limited number of cars of cucumbers and mixed vegetables.  The 770 cars of peaches and 1,200 cars of strawberries originated in east Tennessee. The major portion of all fruits and vegetables originate in central and western parts of Tennessee. This traffic is both local and competitive to lines serving Tennessee and we can and do handle a portion of this traffic originating on connecting lines and moving to territory which we serve to advantage on a competitive basis.  The 400 cars Irish potatoes moved largely through Cincinnati and Louisville thus making our opportunity for handling these potatoes unfavorable. Strawberries in Tennessee moved both via express and freight. Some shippers use freight equipment where the berries can reach markets the next or not later than second morning from loading point.

Illinois. The production of fruits and vegetables in Illinois in 1934 was 2,560 cars, classified as follows: fruit, 1,690; vegetables, 590; strawberries, 140; watermelons, 97; grapes, 30; with a few miscellaneous cars.  This particular year there was a good crop of pears consisting of 872 cars, also 318 cars of peaches and 498 cars of apples.  A considerable portion of the Illinois fruits with the exception of apples are produced in territory tributary to our line. The volume varies from one season to another according to weather and growing conditions.  About every third season Illinois produces and average crop of peaches, which is approximately 2,000 cars.  Illinois vegetables are grown largely in the southern section of the state on or in proximity of our line between Carbondale and Cairo, numerous varieties being produced and shipped in straight or mixed cars.  We have keen competition with trucks on our fruits and vegetables in that particular section of the state. This will be discussed in further detail later.  About 95% of the strawberries originate along and are handled by our line.  The 97 cars of watermelons originated on other lines.

Kentucky.  There were 1,285 cars shipped from Kentucky in 1934 of which 979 were strawberries; 156 sweet potatoes; 40, peaches; and miscellaneous cars of fruits and various vegetables.  Our line originated 641 cars of the 979 cars of strawberries. We also handled practically all of the 200 cars originating on the N.C.&St. L. at Benton Kentucky.  All except four cars of the sweet potatoes originated on our line.  We also originated the 40 cars of peaches at Paducah, Kentucky. Our line therefore secured a haul on a large percentage of the perishables moving from Kentucky in 1934."


The chapter goes on to discuss truck competition, LCL refrigerator service and icing of refrigerator cars.

Jeff White

Alma IL

ch


akerboomk
 

I have transcribed the B&M, national, and [region/district that the B&M was in] numbers here (note new location)
http://bmfreightcars.com/ICC_Freight_Statistics.html

XLS with numbers is linked near top of page

If someone was a glutton for punishment, they could do the same for SP or ATSF or whatever railroad you are interested in.

Granted, for something like the ATSF, the numbers would include both California and "Flyover State" ;-) (Texas, Kansas, & etc.) crops, but it could give you some ideas.

--
Ken Akerboom
http://bmfreightcars.com/


Kenneth Montero
 

The Feds love to crunch numbers because various commercial interests love them even more - and use them to make business decisions. That is what is driving that train. Model railroaders are incidental beneficiaries - at no extra cost.

Ken Montero

On 01/02/2023 2:52 AM Ray Breyer via groups.io <rtbsvrr69@...> wrote:


The Feds love too crunch numbers in a myriad of ways, and have been doing so for well over 100 years. It's pretty easy to crack open a USDA report for any given year and start looking at state produce production numbers. As the vast majority of the US population lived east of the Mississippi during this list's focus, production numbers for places like CA, TX, or MO are sure to be heading east (or for export, but those numbers are in other tables).

If you want to get fancy, you can look at the ICC's annual traffic reports to deduce which railroads carried all of this produce eastward.


Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL



Ray Breyer
 

The Feds love too crunch numbers in a myriad of ways, and have been doing so for well over 100 years. It's pretty easy to crack open a USDA report for any given year and start looking at state produce production numbers. As the vast majority of the US population lived east of the Mississippi during this list's focus, production numbers for places like CA, TX, or MO are sure to be heading east (or for export, but those numbers are in other tables).

If you want to get fancy, you can look at the ICC's annual traffic reports to deduce which railroads carried all of this produce eastward.


Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL