A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934 - an image I find to be spectacular that simply transports us back more than 90 years into the past
 
"Men with products on trucks and horse-drawn wagons near train at Chicago Northwestern Railroad Depot"
 
It is clearly wintertime - everyone is wearing their coats, even the horses!
 
 
Quite a number of things immediately jump out at me, a few of them are...
 
(1) Note how many businesses were still using horses to get the job done in this relatively late 1934 date
 
(2) Note how a few of the conveyances are positioned for side-loading, but the vast majority are positioned for diagonal loading, at maybe a 45 degree angle relative to the freight car involved. None of the vehicles has been positioned at a 90 degree angle against the freight cars - I would think this 90 degree angle would make for the easiest work, with the vehicle back loading door flush against the freight car side, but perhaps that would also entirely block the flow of all other vehicular traffic
 
(3) There is a building clearly marked RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY above the left end of the activity
 
More info can be found at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


Tim O'Connor
 

Claus

Horses == TEAMS => TEAMSTERS => TEAM TRACKS :-D

Railroads in the Chicago area had many of these team track yards - tracks with space in between
for teams and later for trucks. Team tracks still exist to serve offline customers with carload service.

Tim O'Connor


On 5/10/2021 10:47 AM, Claus Schlund wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934 - an image I find to be spectacular that simply transports us back more than 90 years into the past
 
"Men with products on trucks and horse-drawn wagons near train at Chicago Northwestern Railroad Depot"
 
It is clearly wintertime - everyone is wearing their coats, even the horses!
 
 
Quite a number of things immediately jump out at me, a few of them are...
 
(1) Note how many businesses were still using horses to get the job done in this relatively late 1934 date
 
(2) Note how a few of the conveyances are positioned for side-loading, but the vast majority are positioned for diagonal loading, at maybe a 45 degree angle relative to the freight car involved. None of the vehicles has been positioned at a 90 degree angle against the freight cars - I would think this 90 degree angle would make for the easiest work, with the vehicle back loading door flush against the freight car side, but perhaps that would also entirely block the flow of all other vehicular traffic
 
(3) There is a building clearly marked RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY above the left end of the activity
 
More info can be found at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Tim and List Members,
 
Another thing to notice - the NYC steel boxcar closest to thte camera is being unloaded - boxes and boxes of RINSO.
 
Now look two cars back from there, a second NYC steel boxcar loaded with boxes of RINSO.
 
Now look at the next car back from there (USRA ss boxcar, road name unknown) - it is also full of boxes of RINSO.
 
Now look at the truck parked there - LOUIS DOBBRATZ SOAD DISTRIBUTORS! Think they might sell RINSO?
 
Now look at the fully loaded horse cart just past the DOBBRATZ truck - it is full to the top with - you guessed it - RINSO boxes
 
I bet the railroad crews simply refered to this as the RINSO track!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 11:20 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934

Claus

Horses == TEAMS => TEAMSTERS => TEAM TRACKS :-D

Railroads in the Chicago area had many of these team track yards - tracks with space in between
for teams and later for trucks. Team tracks still exist to serve offline customers with carload service.

Tim O'Connor


On 5/10/2021 10:47 AM, Claus Schlund wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934 - an image I find to be spectacular that simply transports us back more than 90 years into the past
 
"Men with products on trucks and horse-drawn wagons near train at Chicago Northwestern Railroad Depot"
 
It is clearly wintertime - everyone is wearing their coats, even the horses!
 
 
Quite a number of things immediately jump out at me, a few of them are...
 
(1) Note how many businesses were still using horses to get the job done in this relatively late 1934 date
 
(2) Note how a few of the conveyances are positioned for side-loading, but the vast majority are positioned for diagonal loading, at maybe a 45 degree angle relative to the freight car involved. None of the vehicles has been positioned at a 90 degree angle against the freight cars - I would think this 90 degree angle would make for the easiest work, with the vehicle back loading door flush against the freight car side, but perhaps that would also entirely block the flow of all other vehicular traffic
 
(3) There is a building clearly marked RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY above the left end of the activity
 
More info can be found at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Jim Betz
 

Claus,
  I love the guy in the light colored hat who is looking directly at the camera!

  I noticed that the 'crews' at the individual cars that are unloading all seem to be
food/household goods.  And that all of them seem to be unloading product in
cardboard boxes.  No reefers in this line of cars.

  "A busy time at the team track" ... INDEED.  I have never seen a team track
that long nor one with anything even close to that many cars.  Each guy 
probably had to "check in" to get the car number for his load.  Most of them
seem to be only one or two guys doing the unloading from the train ... so
they were going to be there for a little while.  

  Question - is this a "30's scene" that was replaced by palletized loads
that were unloading in a freight dock soon after?
                                                                                                       - Jim
                                                                                                                            - Jim


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Jim and List members,
 
Jim wrote: "I love the guy in the light colored hat who is looking directly at the camera!"
 
I noticed that too! He's the big boss, not going to get his clothes dirty!
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Jim Betz
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 11:30 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934

Claus,
  I love the guy in the light colored hat who is looking directly at the camera!

  I noticed that the 'crews' at the individual cars that are unloading all seem to be
food/household goods.  And that all of them seem to be unloading product in
cardboard boxes.  No reefers in this line of cars.

  "A busy time at the team track" ... INDEED.  I have never seen a team track
that long nor one with anything even close to that many cars.  Each guy 
probably had to "check in" to get the car number for his load.  Most of them
seem to be only one or two guys doing the unloading from the train ... so
they were going to be there for a little while.  

  Question - is this a "30's scene" that was replaced by palletized loads
that were unloading in a freight dock soon after?
                                                                                                       - Jim
                                                                                                                            - Jim


Tim O'Connor
 

Claus

That's pretty amazing! On the other hand, that may be EXACTLY why the photograph was taken. :-D

Tim O'Connor


On 5/10/2021 11:29 AM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) wrote:
Hi Tim and List Members,
 
Another thing to notice - the NYC steel boxcar closest to thte camera is being unloaded - boxes and boxes of RINSO.
 
Now look two cars back from there, a second NYC steel boxcar loaded with boxes of RINSO.
 
Now look at the next car back from there (USRA ss boxcar, road name unknown) - it is also full of boxes of RINSO.
 
Now look at the truck parked there - LOUIS DOBBRATZ SOAD DISTRIBUTORS! Think they might sell RINSO?
 
Now look at the fully loaded horse cart just past the DOBBRATZ truck - it is full to the top with - you guessed it - RINSO boxes
 
I bet the railroad crews simply refered to this as the RINSO track!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


vapeurchapelon
 

>> 1934 - an image I find to be spectacular that simply transports us back more than 90 years into the past <<
 
For me, still less than 90 years... ;-)
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954
 
Gesendet: Montag, 10. Mai 2021 um 16:47 Uhr
Von: "Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)" <claus@...>
An: "STMFC" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Betreff: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934
Hi List Members,
 
A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934 - an image I find to be spectacular that simply transports us back more than 90 years into the past
 
"Men with products on trucks and horse-drawn wagons near train at Chicago Northwestern Railroad Depot"
 
It is clearly wintertime - everyone is wearing their coats, even the horses!
 
 
Quite a number of things immediately jump out at me, a few of them are...
 
(1) Note how many businesses were still using horses to get the job done in this relatively late 1934 date
 
(2) Note how a few of the conveyances are positioned for side-loading, but the vast majority are positioned for diagonal loading, at maybe a 45 degree angle relative to the freight car involved. None of the vehicles has been positioned at a 90 degree angle against the freight cars - I would think this 90 degree angle would make for the easiest work, with the vehicle back loading door flush against the freight car side, but perhaps that would also entirely block the flow of all other vehicular traffic
 
(3) There is a building clearly marked RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY above the left end of the activity
 
More info can be found at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


Charlie Vlk
 

Claus-

The second link to “A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934” doesn’t take you to the base page with the photo information.

I can’t place the location.   It isn’t east or west of the Wells Street station as the depot(?) clock tower is different.  Doesn’t look like the “potato yard” at Western Avenue….

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of vapeurchapelon
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 11:15 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934

 

>> 1934 - an image I find to be spectacular that simply transports us back more than 90 years into the past <<

 

For me, still less than 90 years... ;-)

 

Johannes

Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954

 

Gesendet: Montag, 10. Mai 2021 um 16:47 Uhr
Von: "Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)" <claus@...>
An: "STMFC" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Betreff: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934

Hi List Members,

 

A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934 - an image I find to be spectacular that simply transports us back more than 90 years into the past

 

"Men with products on trucks and horse-drawn wagons near train at Chicago Northwestern Railroad Depot"

 

It is clearly wintertime - everyone is wearing their coats, even the horses!

 

 

Quite a number of things immediately jump out at me, a few of them are...

 

(1) Note how many businesses were still using horses to get the job done in this relatively late 1934 date

 

(2) Note how a few of the conveyances are positioned for side-loading, but the vast majority are positioned for diagonal loading, at maybe a 45 degree angle relative to the freight car involved. None of the vehicles has been positioned at a 90 degree angle against the freight cars - I would think this 90 degree angle would make for the easiest work, with the vehicle back loading door flush against the freight car side, but perhaps that would also entirely block the flow of all other vehicular traffic

 

(3) There is a building clearly marked RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY above the left end of the activity

 

More info can be found at the link below...

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 

 


Dennis Storzek
 

Charlie,

I think I'm seeing the Board of Trade building in the fog at the left, so it's someplace in the freight house district between Grand Central and Dearborn Station.

Dennis Storzek


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Charlie,
 
Thanks, that was my error. The corrected 'second link' is shown below...
 
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 1:31 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934

Claus-

The second link to “A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934” doesn’t take you to the base page with the photo information.

I can’t place the location.   It isn’t east or west of the Wells Street station as the depot(?) clock tower is different.  Doesn’t look like the “potato yard” at Western Avenue….

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of vapeurchapelon
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 11:15 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934

 

>> 1934 - an image I find to be spectacular that simply transports us back more than 90 years into the past <<

 

For me, still less than 90 years... ;-)

 

Johannes

Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954

 

Gesendet: Montag, 10. Mai 2021 um 16:47 Uhr
Von: "Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)" <claus@...>
An: "STMFC" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Betreff: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934

Hi List Members,

 

A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934 - an image I find to be spectacular that simply transports us back more than 90 years into the past

 

"Men with products on trucks and horse-drawn wagons near train at Chicago Northwestern Railroad Depot"

 

It is clearly wintertime - everyone is wearing their coats, even the horses!

 

 

Quite a number of things immediately jump out at me, a few of them are...

 

(1) Note how many businesses were still using horses to get the job done in this relatively late 1934 date

 

(2) Note how a few of the conveyances are positioned for side-loading, but the vast majority are positioned for diagonal loading, at maybe a 45 degree angle relative to the freight car involved. None of the vehicles has been positioned at a 90 degree angle against the freight cars - I would think this 90 degree angle would make for the easiest work, with the vehicle back loading door flush against the freight car side, but perhaps that would also entirely block the flow of all other vehicular traffic

 

(3) There is a building clearly marked RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY above the left end of the activity

 

More info can be found at the link below...

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 

 


Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, May 10, 2021 at 11:49 AM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) wrote:
Thanks, that was my error. The corrected 'second link' is shown below...
 
Well, that helps with the confusion... the scene is in Milwaukee, not Chicago, in which case the clock tower is the old C&NW Lake Front Station.

Dennis Storzek


jace6315
 

Looks to me that all the cars have the same cargo: boxes of Rinso soap. I wonder what was so noteworthy about several carloads of soap that the brass hats and the photographer came out to the team track on a cold day in Chicago in the 1930's.

Jim Matthews

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐

On Monday, May 10, 2021 2:49 PM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) <claus@...> wrote:

Hi Charlie,
 
Thanks, that was my error. The corrected 'second link' is shown below...
 
 
Claus Schlund
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 1:31 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934

Claus-

The second link to “A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934” doesn’t take you to the base page with the photo information.

I can’t place the location.   It isn’t east or west of the Wells Street station as the depot(?) clock tower is different.  Doesn’t look like the “potato yard” at Western Avenue….

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of vapeurchapelon
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 11:15 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934

 

>> 1934 - an image I find to be spectacular that simply transports us back more than 90 years into the past <<

 

For me, still less than 90 years... ;-)

 

Johannes

Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954

 

Gesendet: Montag, 10. Mai 2021 um 16:47 Uhr
Von: "Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)" <claus@...>
An: "STMFC" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Betreff: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934

Hi List Members,

 

A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934 - an image I find to be spectacular that simply transports us back more than 90 years into the past

 

"Men with products on trucks and horse-drawn wagons near train at Chicago Northwestern Railroad Depot"

 

It is clearly wintertime - everyone is wearing their coats, even the horses!

 

 

Quite a number of things immediately jump out at me, a few of them are...

 

(1) Note how many businesses were still using horses to get the job done in this relatively late 1934 date

 

(2) Note how a few of the conveyances are positioned for side-loading, but the vast majority are positioned for diagonal loading, at maybe a 45 degree angle relative to the freight car involved. None of the vehicles has been positioned at a 90 degree angle against the freight cars - I would think this 90 degree angle would make for the easiest work, with the vehicle back loading door flush against the freight car side, but perhaps that would also entirely block the flow of all other vehicular traffic

 

(3) There is a building clearly marked RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY above the left end of the activity

 

More info can be found at the link below...

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 

 




CJ Riley
 


Horses were used later than most folks think. Milk and bread were delivered to homes in my neighborhood in Toronto as late as 1949 when we moved to “rural” North Yorke where trucks were used. When I told my parents I missed the horses I was told they got too tired walking all the way from the city.



Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Obviously not my best day - I need to pay more attention!
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 3:14 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] A busy time at the team track Chicago 1934

On Mon, May 10, 2021 at 11:49 AM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) wrote:
Thanks, that was my error. The corrected 'second link' is shown below...
 
Well, that helps with the confusion... the scene is in Milwaukee, not Chicago, in which case the clock tower is the old C&NW Lake Front Station.

Dennis Storzek


Charlie Vlk
 

Claus-

Now I understand….the photo is not in Chicago; the station in the background to the North is the C&NW Milwaukee Lakefront depot.

East Buffalo and North Jackson St.   Jackson Boulevard in Chicago is near the south loop and runs east-west and there aren’t any C&NW facilities on it.

Great photo, though!!!

Charlie Vlk

 

Rinso as a laundry soap brand lasted to the mid-1960s.  Introduced in 1918 it was one of the first mass-marketed soap powders.   Lever Brothers changed the name to Surf which is still being sold.   The Rinso name was sold to 99 Cents Only Stores and they use in the United States only for an in-store line of cleaning products.   The Rinso brand is still used in the Turkish, Asian, Indonesian and Central American markets by Lever Brothers.

 


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Horses were still around the Detroit area until, maybe, 1950-51. Not at all common, but still around. The ones I remember were pulling small vendor wagons making local deliveries of produce, milk, ice, etc. I can’t remember exactly … I was only a few years old then, but I remember them clomping along the street. Always attracted the kids, something just a bit unusal. Such wagons were far outnumbered by assorted small trucks.

I also remember, in the same time frame, lots of chain-drive trucks and solid-rubber-tires (on metal or wood spoked wheels). Big “AC” Macks and others. Again, not the norm, but very much still around.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On May 10, 2021, at 3:52 PM, CJ Riley via groups.io <cjriley42@...> wrote:


Horses were used later than most folks think. Milk and bread were delivered to homes in my neighborhood in Toronto as late as 1949 when we moved to “rural” North Yorke where trucks were used. When I told my parents I missed the horses I was told they got too tired walking all the way from the city.




Jim Betz
 

  I -knew- that guy in the light hat ... his name was Fred Rinso ... and he was a
son-of-a-bitch to work for, you could never work fast enough or long enough to
get a single word of praise from him for a job well done.  *G*
                                                                                                                   - Jim


Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, May 10, 2021 at 12:22 PM, jace6315 wrote:
I wonder what was so noteworthy about several carloads of soap that the brass hats and the photographer came out to the team track on a cold day in Chicago in the 1930's.
 
Actually, the photo is in Milwaukee. Could be that far north soap that you didn't have to make yourself from bear grease and wood ashes was still a novel concept in 1934. More likely the sales rep for Rinso wanted to run a newspaper ad showing that the city was all washed up now that Rinso was in town, and arranged for all his accounts to come to the team track when the photographer was there. That likely also explains why all the trucks and wagons are turned to display their owners names. I bet the Al Capone look-alike in the light colored hat is the sales rep, wondering how much longer the photographer is going to spend taking this photo and what the bill is going to be.

Dennis Storzek
 


Dave Parker
 

Now, as far as freight cars go....

The NYC all-steel car in MOL the middle is part of lot 595-B, built in 1929, and reweighed at East Buffalo, 10-33.  I find this fascinating because the paint looks almost new (and unweathered).  Is this the factory paint, or did the NYC repaint after no more than 4 years?  If the latter, why?

The very similar car two cars forward is from the 961xx series, lot 530-B built in 1926.  The paint job looks identical, although this one is has to be a repaint based on the builder's photos of this series.

Both cars illustrate the NYC's refusal to go along with the horizontal bars above and below the reporting marks until 1936.

And, the library's guesstimate of "ca 1934" is quite plausible.

Great photo for a 1934 modeler!
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA