Topics

About match-making (so to speak)

David Soderblom
 

About matches:  When Giant Sequoias were being logged ca. 1900 their enormous trunks were used for matches.



David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA





Tim O'Connor
 


It's too horrible to contemplate how much fabulous old growth timber was wantonly destroyed. Ugh.

Think of all the old retired freight cars that were simply BURNED in the open to recover the steel.
Millions of freight cars! Compare to the recovery of salt-infused timber from the SP's Salt Lake trestle
that was sold for its beauty in the 1980's or 1990's.

When did paper matchbooks first appear by the way?

Tim O'

On 7/9/2020 1:40 PM, David Soderblom wrote:
About matches:  When Giant Sequoias were being logged ca. 1900 their enormous trunks were used for matches.

David Soderblom


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

vapeurchapelon
 

So true, Tim. Unfortunately. And don't forget the destruction of habitat and the impact to the fauna before the excessive and thoughtless one-time usage of the wood (and other things). Usually this has always been glorified to civilization out of the wilderness...
A worldwide problem, and still current.
 
By all the greatness and fascination of the steam train era and lots of other technical things at that time - this was also the era because of which words like ecology or environmental protection have been invented.
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953
 
Gesendet: Freitag, 10. Juli 2020 um 16:55 Uhr
Von: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] About match-making (so to speak)

It's too horrible to contemplate how much fabulous old growth timber was wantonly destroyed. Ugh.

Think of all the old retired freight cars that were simply BURNED in the open to recover the steel.
Millions of freight cars! Compare to the recovery of salt-infused timber from the SP's Salt Lake trestle
that was sold for its beauty in the 1980's or 1990's.

When did paper matchbooks first appear by the way?

Tim O'

On 7/9/2020 1:40 PM, David Soderblom wrote:
About matches:  When Giant Sequoias were being logged ca. 1900 their enormous trunks were used for matches.
 
David Soderblom

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Schuyler Larrabee
 

1892

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 10:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] About match-making (so to speak)

 


It's too horrible to contemplate how much fabulous old growth timber was wantonly destroyed. Ugh.

Think of all the old retired freight cars that were simply BURNED in the open to recover the steel.
Millions of freight cars! Compare to the recovery of salt-infused timber from the SP's Salt Lake trestle
that was sold for its beauty in the 1980's or 1990's.

When did paper matchbooks first appear by the way?

Tim O'

On 7/9/2020 1:40 PM, David Soderblom wrote:

About matches:  When Giant Sequoias were being logged ca. 1900 their enormous trunks were used for matches.

David Soderblom

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

David and Tim,

The destruction of the inland redwoods was particularly brutal. Unlike the more sturdy coastal redwoods, the inland trees had very brittle wood. When the tree was felled, often a lot was so damaged it couldn't be worked into dimensional lumber. I suppose toothpicks were one way to salvage what they could from these noble trees. Much wood was just left behind on the forest floor. Since a great deal of the inland redwood forests were virtually stolen from the U.S. Government through false homesteading claims filed by "straw men" and cost the lumber companies almost nothing, the loggers just moved on to the next tree.

Yes, some of this timber was moved to mills on freight cars (mandatory content).

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

 

On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 10:56 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

It's too horrible to contemplate how much fabulous old growth timber was wantonly destroyed. Ugh.

Think of all the old retired freight cars that were simply BURNED in the open to recover the steel.
Millions of freight cars! Compare to the recovery of salt-infused timber from the SP's Salt Lake trestle
that was sold for its beauty in the 1980's or 1990's.

When did paper matchbooks first appear by the way?

Tim O'

On 7/9/2020 1:40 PM, David Soderblom wrote:
About matches:  When Giant Sequoias were being logged ca. 1900 their enormous trunks were used for matches.

David Soderblom


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Thomas Klosterman
 

Eventually (early 20th century) most of the matches in the US were manufactured in Barberton, Ohio [Diamond Match and others served by the A&BBRR (the "Belt Line") from interchange with the PRR] and Wadsworth, Ohio (nearby and served by the Erie). Many men in Barberton worked at the match factories. My father, as a youth, worked as a "block feeder," feeding blocks of (probably) these or similar blocks made from trees like this into a machine that produced matchsticks. My Grandfather worked in the dipping tank area. The Blue Tip Match was made in Wadsworth with the same equipment until the 1980's. The town still celebrates the Blue Tip Festival. 
Diamond match was started and owned by Ohio Columbus Barber (who planned and started the town), hence "Barberton." He also started the Belt Line (and many other manufacturers in town) and eventually sold it to a combination of PRR. B&O, Erie and maybe the AC&Y.  Interesting history here.

Gary Ray
 

Even though Barberton, Ohio, was the original site of Diamond Match, they had a hugh west coast factory occupying 280 acres in Barber, CA (now part of Chico).  The first air conditioning system for industry was developed for this facility for the summer months (101 yesterday @ 6 pm).  This helped eliminate Fumes that would build up causing phosphorus necrosis.  I’ve attached a couple of photos.  The first is feeding the blocks and the second is cutting blocks and setting matches into plates.  These photos are from the Ohio facility.

 

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Thomas Klosterman
Sent: Saturday, July 11, 2020 9:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] About match-making (so to speak)

 

Eventually (early 20th century) most of the matches in the US were manufactured in Barberton, Ohio [Diamond Match and others served by the A&BBRR (the "Belt Line") from interchange with the PRR] and Wadsworth, Ohio (nearby and served by the Erie). Many men in Barberton worked at the match factories. My father, as a youth, worked as a "block feeder," feeding blocks of (probably) these or similar blocks made from trees like this into a machine that produced matchsticks. My Grandfather worked in the dipping tank area. The Blue Tip Match was made in Wadsworth with the same equipment until the 1980's. The town still celebrates the Blue Tip Festival. 
Diamond match was started and owned by Ohio Columbus Barber (who planned and started the town), hence "Barberton." He also started the Belt Line (and many other manufacturers in town) and eventually sold it to a combination of PRR. B&O, Erie and maybe the AC&Y.  Interesting history here.


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Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Gary,

Diamond Match also had a major plant at Red Bluff. Both plants were switched by 4-wheel GE diesels. I don't know about matches, but I think both plants were involved in dimensional lumber. When I was a youngster, there were Diamond Match hardware stores/lumber yards all over California, the Lowes of their day. Attached are my father's photos from the late 1960s or early 1970s. The yellow engine is Chico, the orange is Red Bluff.

The Diamond Match plant in Barber built at least one wooden electric locomotive, CE/NE/SN 701, for the Chico Electric Railway (later Northern Electric, then Sacramento Northern).  Diamond Match and the Northern Electric had a close relationship, and I think many of the NE officers were also associated with Diamond Match.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On Sat, Jul 11, 2020 at 1:23 PM Gary Ray <gerber1926@...> wrote:

Even though Barberton, Ohio, was the original site of Diamond Match, they had a hugh west coast factory occupying 280 acres in Barber, CA (now part of Chico).  The first air conditioning system for industry was developed for this facility for the summer months (101 yesterday @ 6 pm).  This helped eliminate Fumes that would build up causing phosphorus necrosis.  I’ve attached a couple of photos.  The first is feeding the blocks and the second is cutting blocks and setting matches into plates.  These photos are from the Ohio facility.

 

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Thomas Klosterman
Sent: Saturday, July 11, 2020 9:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] About match-making (so to speak)

 

Eventually (early 20th century) most of the matches in the US were manufactured in Barberton, Ohio [Diamond Match and others served by the A&BBRR (the "Belt Line") from interchange with the PRR] and Wadsworth, Ohio (nearby and served by the Erie). Many men in Barberton worked at the match factories. My father, as a youth, worked as a "block feeder," feeding blocks of (probably) these or similar blocks made from trees like this into a machine that produced matchsticks. My Grandfather worked in the dipping tank area. The Blue Tip Match was made in Wadsworth with the same equipment until the 1980's. The town still celebrates the Blue Tip Festival. 
Diamond match was started and owned by Ohio Columbus Barber (who planned and started the town), hence "Barberton." He also started the Belt Line (and many other manufacturers in town) and eventually sold it to a combination of PRR. B&O, Erie and maybe the AC&Y.  Interesting history here.


Virus-free. www.avast.com

Doug Paasch
 

Nice shot of the sawdust burner as well as the loco.  A lot of good details seen on the sawdust burner that will help me model one.  Thanks for the unexpected detail!

   Doug Paasch


On Jul 11, 2020 5:56 PM, "Garth Groff and Sally Sanford" <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Gary,

Diamond Match also had a major plant at Red Bluff. Both plants were switched by 4-wheel GE diesels. I don't know about matches, but I think both plants were involved in dimensional lumber. When I was a youngster, there were Diamond Match hardware stores/lumber yards all over California, the Lowes of their day. Attached are my father's photos from the late 1960s or early 1970s. The yellow engine is Chico, the orange is Red Bluff.

The Diamond Match plant in Barber built at least one wooden electric locomotive, CE/NE/SN 701, for the Chico Electric Railway (later Northern Electric, then Sacramento Northern).  Diamond Match and the Northern Electric had a close relationship, and I think many of the NE officers were also associated with Diamond Match.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On Sat, Jul 11, 2020 at 1:23 PM Gary Ray <gerber1926@...> wrote:

Even though Barberton, Ohio, was the original site of Diamond Match, they had a hugh west coast factory occupying 280 acres in Barber, CA (now part of Chico).  The first air conditioning system for industry was developed for this facility for the summer months (101 yesterday @ 6 pm).  This helped eliminate Fumes that would build up causing phosphorus necrosis.  I’ve attached a couple of photos.  The first is feeding the blocks and the second is cutting blocks and setting matches into plates.  These photos are from the Ohio facility.

 

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@....io] On Behalf Of Thomas Klosterman
Sent: Saturday, July 11, 2020 9:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] About match-making (so to speak)

 

Eventually (early 20th century) most of the matches in the US were manufactured in Barberton, Ohio [Diamond Match and others served by the A&BBRR (the "Belt Line") from interchange with the PRR] and Wadsworth, Ohio (nearby and served by the Erie). Many men in Barberton worked at the match factories. My father, as a youth, worked as a "block feeder," feeding blocks of (probably) these or similar blocks made from trees like this into a machine that produced matchsticks. My Grandfather worked in the dipping tank area. The Blue Tip Match was made in Wadsworth with the same equipment until the 1980's. The town still celebrates the Blue Tip Festival. 
Diamond match was started and owned by Ohio Columbus Barber (who planned and started the town), hence "Barberton." He also started the Belt Line (and many other manufacturers in town) and eventually sold it to a combination of PRR. B&O, Erie and maybe the AC&Y.  Interesting history here.


Virus-free. www.avast.com