Topics

ACC problems

Donald B. Valentine
 

   I have been assembling resin car kits for some 35 years now beginning with Dennis Storzek's Rutland 
box cars back when the material was a lot tougher than resin and Al Westerfield's kits when he was using 
really brittle resin, always using ACC but never having experienced the problem I've had for the last week.
I've been trying to assemble one of Steve Funaro's kits that seems no different than the many of his I've
also assembled before BUT the damned ACC is not cementing parts together. I beleive the bottle is now 
three years old and is kept in the refrigerator when not being used regularly. It doesn't seem to matter 
whether I try to use it right out of the refrigerator or after it has sat out at room temperature for a day it 
simply does not work. Does ths stuff have a shelf life that I've never been aware of or has anyone else
experienced the same problem? Guess I'll go back to styrene for awhile rather than waste more time 
only to get more frustrated. 

Don Valentine

Pierre Oliver
 

I've found that CA does have a shelf life
Buy a fresh bottle and see what happens

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 2020-05-27 4:48 p.m., Donald B. Valentine via groups.io wrote:

   I have been assembling resin car kits for some 35 years now beginning with Dennis Storzek's Rutland 
box cars back when the material was a lot tougher than resin and Al Westerfield's kits when he was using 
really brittle resin, always using ACC but never having experienced the problem I've had for the last week.
I've been trying to assemble one of Steve Funaro's kits that seems no different than the many of his I've
also assembled before BUT the damned ACC is not cementing parts together. I beleive the bottle is now 
three years old and is kept in the refrigerator when not being used regularly. It doesn't seem to matter 
whether I try to use it right out of the refrigerator or after it has sat out at room temperature for a day it 
simply does not work. Does ths stuff have a shelf life that I've never been aware of or has anyone else
experienced the same problem? Guess I'll go back to styrene for awhile rather than waste more time 
only to get more frustrated. 

Don Valentine

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

Does the ACC still work on other stuff? Does a new bottle work?  

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On May 27, 2020, at 3:48 PM, Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt@...> wrote:


   I have been assembling resin car kits for some 35 years now beginning with Dennis Storzek's Rutland 
box cars back when the material was a lot tougher than resin and Al Westerfield's kits when he was using 
really brittle resin, always using ACC but never having experienced the problem I've had for the last week.
I've been trying to assemble one of Steve Funaro's kits that seems no different than the many of his I've
also assembled before BUT the damned ACC is not cementing parts together. I beleive the bottle is now 
three years old and is kept in the refrigerator when not being used regularly. It doesn't seem to matter 
whether I try to use it right out of the refrigerator or after it has sat out at room temperature for a day it 
simply does not work. Does ths stuff have a shelf life that I've never been aware of or has anyone else
experienced the same problem? Guess I'll go back to styrene for awhile rather than waste more time 
only to get more frustrated. 

Don Valentine

Denis Kahl
 

I have also recently run into a shelf life issue with ACC and nothing would stick even with accelerator. No idea how long I have had it but probably several years. Buying a new bottle fixed the issue. I keep it in a sealed jar with dessicant.

Denis Kahl
Melbourne
Australia

Malcolm H. Houck
 

It may seem profligate......but I don't waste my time "saving" - keeping - preserving what are quite essentially products to be consumed. I've never  had a problem with aged or aging ACC because I throw the unused material away.......not on a schedule or according to any workbench protocol I've established.

When a structure......car.....kit or scratch build is completed I usually throw away any left over ACC and start with a new supply upon commencing a new build.

The same goes for paint. I'm not at all fond of spending time building....anything, and especially the hundred or so hours spent scratchbuilding a locomotive model, to have trouble with a less that fresh virgin bottle of paint. Once the bottle has been opened I have no doubt that it degrades. I do take care to clean the bottle top edges after use and I often store valued paints upside down......on a hope that orientation will eliminate air infiltration.

However, when mixing paints, and I always make non-specific mixes for steam locomotives; --  black-gray-MOW white- boxcar red to suite and store a mix carefully. Once the engine is painted, lettered, weathered and placed in service the mix is simply tossed and the mix-storage jar is cleaned for reuse another time.

From a nickel.....three cents change.

Mal Houck


Thomas Evans
 

I've had exactly your problem, Don.
Throw it out & get a new bottle.

Tom E.

Bill Welch
 

For as long s I can remember I have preferred  buying the blister packs with 2-4 small tubes. For the past 5 years or so my preferred brand has been DURO, a Henkel product that comes packaged in fours. They are 0.1 oz. tubes. One will last me 3-4 months and stay good to the end and seems less prone to clogged tips. I was buying it at Home Depot but it seems no longer available there. Back in December when i could not find DURO I bought both DAP and  Super Glue which is a Pacer brand—both came two to a blister pack. I threw the DAP away right after I opened it—way too thick. The "Super Glue" has been fine. It comes in .12 oz. tubes. I just used up the first tube so that means it lasted 5 months. 

Recently while in Walmart I found my favored DURO so I hope that will continue but at least I have a backup with Super Glue. The bottles may be fine for high volume users but for someone like me that is steadily building one or two kits at a time, the small tubes are best. If one goes bad, toss it and open a fresh one and keep going.

Model on Ya'll!
Bill Welch