Accuracy Of The Official Railway Equipment Registers - car rebuilding


akerboomk
 

Another possible reason that car rebuilding declined in the late 1920s is that the “all wood”, steel centersill, and (possibly) SUF cars started getting retired.

As all-steel cars came along, there was less NEED to rebuild large numbers of cars every few years.

Although I’m sure the tax laws / economics were the larger influence on behavior.


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Ken Akerboom


Dennis Storzek
 

Ken, 

You are off by about twelve or fifteen years. The last large group of wood framed, SUF boxcars were the USRA DS cars, and they weren't built until 1918-19. They were just coming due for rebuilding in the mid thirties, and are the reason for the development of the Youngstown Steel Door Co. pre-fab car sides. Once those proved themselves, some roads used them to rebuild their steel framed USRA single sheathed cars, not so much because that design was deficient, but to get larger cars.

Dennis Storzek


Dave Parker
 

My sense (no data) is that, at least in the northeast, the rebuilding of 36-ft box-cars constructed ca 1906-1914 was continuing unabated through the 1920s.  These were almost all SUF cars.  The thing that stopped these rebuilding programs cold was the Depression.  Not much surplus capital, and lots of cars sitting around on sidings looking for loads.  Maybe an oversimplification, but it works for me. YMMV of course.
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Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, May 7, 2021 at 03:35 PM, Dave Parker wrote:
My sense (no data) is that, at least in the northeast, the rebuilding of 36-ft box-cars constructed ca 1906-1914 was continuing unabated through the 1920s.
This was certainly the case with the NYC system. At the turn of the twentieth century they were building 36' boxcars with truss rod wood underframes; about 1910 they adapted the same design to SUF, then almost immediately started rebuilding the earlier cars with several designs of retrofit SUF. Found several drawings in the Pullman Library of the underframes when researching the cars that were the prototype for the Accurail model. Some of these earlier cars were about 1'-6" shorter and the underframes were built to fit that shorter length. By WWI the rebuilding was also including new steel ends, and as the cars were re-roofed with outside metal roofs in the twenties, the rebuilt cars became virtually indistinguishable from the cars that had been built new with these features.

Dennis Storzek