ACR Side Construction


 

Group,

A very good look at the inside of an ACR boxcar side and how it's constructed.

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Union-Pacific/UP-Freight-Cars/i-bgD2NbD/A

Dan Smith


Ed Hawkins
 



On Jun 4, 2021, at 2:23 PM, Dan Smith <espeefan@...> wrote:

Group,

A very good look at the inside of an ACR boxcar side and how it's constructed.

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Union-Pacific/UP-Freight-Cars/i-bgD2NbD/A

Dan Smith

Bill,
Dan Smith says to follow this!!! 
Ed


Ed Hawkins
 

STMFC,
My apologies for replying to the STMFC instead of forwarding the message to my friend Bill, who I know has been working on a model of this general type. 
Regards,
Ed Hawkins

On Jun 4, 2021, at 4:20 PM, Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@...> wrote:


On Jun 4, 2021, at 2:23 PM, Dan Smith <espeefan@...> wrote:

Group,

A very good look at the inside of an ACR boxcar side and how it's constructed.

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Union-Pacific/UP-Freight-Cars/i-bgD2NbD/A

Dan Smith

Bill,
Dan Smith says to follow this!!! 
Ed


Tony Thompson
 



A very good look at the inside of an ACR boxcar side and how it's constructed.

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Union-Pacific/UP-Freight-Cars/i-bgD2NbD/A

Note that it’s an ACR side, with the light angles between the main posts. The assembled car at left is too.

Tony Thompson



Schuyler Larrabee
 

OK, I see that an ACR side has a secondary smaller mid-panel  rib, secured with rivets spaced at double the spacing for the main ribs/panel joints.

 

So once again, what is the term for the rivet pattern that reveals the use of a hat channel at the panel joints, where there also is a principal line of closely spaced rivets along with a secondary line which is double spaced?

 

BTW, in this second instance, the double-spaced line is sometimes in the same grid as the closely spaced line, and is sometimes offset by a half step, so to speak.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Friday, June 04, 2021 5:48 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] ACR Side Construction

 

 

 

A very good look at the inside of an ACR boxcar side and how it's constructed.

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Union-Pacific/UP-Freight-Cars/i-bgD2NbD/A

 

Note that it’s an ACR side, with the light angles between the main posts. The assembled car at left is too.

 

Tony Thompson

 

 


Ken Adams
 

Very interesting photo. The photo doesn't give a location. But I would guess it is not Omaha in the winter.

I like the long shop truck in the foreground and the stacked air brake reservoirs and other parts.  Under the shop track there appear what may be wood kegs of rivets? 

If you go to the previous photo it looks like they are lowering the frame onto the trucks. is that a drawbar casting in the lower right?  The following photo is also an interesting view of a GS type flat car under construction. 
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Randy Hammill
 

I don’t know the answer to that, but a I do wonder where the term ACR came from. Was it an industry term or something coined by modelers/historians?

I suppose I should go digging through CBCs when I get home.

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Prototype Junction
http://prototypejunction.com

Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954
http://newbritainstation.com


Tim O'Connor
 

Randy

ACR was a solution that arose when railroads chose to use thinner copper bearing steel side
sheets (Cor-Ten steel) that were not as rigid as the thicker conventional side sheets. The UP
obviously felt the weight savings was worth the extra cost, while some like the SP only used it
for some cars and then dropped it. (The Cor-Ten side sheets required an extra vertical stiffener.)

As for the terminology, I don't know who coined it. :-)

Tim O'Connor


On 6/5/2021 11:01 AM, Randy Hammill wrote:
I don’t know the answer to that, but a I do wonder where the term ACR came from. Was it an industry term or something coined by modelers/historians?

I suppose I should go digging through CBCs when I get home.

Randy

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, Jun 5, 2021 at 08:01 AM, Randy Hammill wrote:
Was it an industry term or something coined by modelers/historians?
Has to be a modeler's term. On the prototype they'd be concerned with the structural member, not the attachment rivets.

Dennis Storzek


Tim O'Connor
 


Terry Metcalfe's UP Freight Cars book (p 93) mentions that the B-50-24 construction saved
over 5,000 pounds over the B-50-19 and that the October 1939 issue of Railway Mechanical
Engineer has an extensive article on the cars. If someone has that issue of RME maybe we can
find out whether they had a name for this style of construction. :-)

Tim O'Connor



On 6/5/2021 2:37 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
On Sat, Jun 5, 2021 at 08:01 AM, Randy Hammill wrote:
Was it an industry term or something coined by modelers/historians?
Has to be a modeler's term. On the prototype they'd be concerned with the structural member, not the attachment rivets.

Dennis Storzek

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Randy Hammill
 

Yes, I know why they have the extra rivets, just didn't know if there was an industry term. 

The 1943 CBC has a notation of a photo of 187085, noted as, "light weight construction." It also has another notation: Description, Railway Mechanical Engineer, October, 1939--Description of earlier lot, Class B50-21, Railway Mechanical Engineer, April 1938. I hadn't noticed such information before. For a D&RGW auto car it notes that it was described in Railway Age, January 13, 1940 and Railway Mechanical Engineer in February, 1940.

It also has two pictures that are reversed - 186028 has a caption that says it is of low-alloy high-tensile steel but is a picture of 186028, a welded car, and there's a picture of 193464 with a caption that says, "Welded construction," although it's clearly not as it's a car with ACR. Oops.

My suspicion is, "light weight construction," and, "low-allow high-tensile steel," will be reflected in those articles since the lighter weight was the selling point, not the fact that there were additional intermediate stiffeners required. Time to read RP Cyc 31-32 again a little more closely...

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Prototype Junction
http://prototypejunction.com

Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954
http://newbritainstation.com


Bill Kelly
 


Find the January 1987, vol 3 number 1 issue of the UPHS magazine, _The Streamliner_. There is a very good article by Frank Peacock titled "Box and Autocar Nomenclature". This is the first publication of his term "ACR" along with many others.
Later,
Bill Kelly 
 
Tim wrote:

Randy

ACR was a solution that arose when railroads chose to use thinner copper bearing steel side
sheets (Cor-Ten steel) that were not as rigid as the thicker conventional side sheets. The UP
obviously felt the weight savings was worth the extra cost, while some like the SP only used it
for some cars and then dropped it. (The Cor-Ten side sheets required an extra vertical stiffener.)

As for the terminology, I don't know who coined it. :-)

Tim O'Connor


On 6/5/2021 11:01 AM, Randy Hammill wrote:
I don’t know the answer to that, but a I do wonder where the term ACR came from. Was it an industry term or something coined by modelers/historians?

I suppose I should go digging through CBCs when I get home.

Randy