Adding patches and light weights to finished models


Charlie Duckworth
 

I’ve pick up a set of decals for light weights, scale and repack locations from Smokebox Graphics recently and want to add them to already finished models.  One method I’ve tried is to put down diluted Elmers white glue and set the decal on it and pick up any residue with a Q-Tip.  

Any other tricks others are using?  
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne


Brian Carlson
 

You glue the decal down? 

When I add decals to otherwise completed models I lay down Microscale gloss using a small brush in the area of the decal. I let that dry them decal like normal. 

Reweigh decals would be weathered differently than the rest of the car. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On May 20, 2022, at 5:01 PM, Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:



I’ve pick up a set of decals for light weights, scale and repack locations from Smokebox Graphics recently and want to add them to already finished models.  One method I’ve tried is to put down diluted Elmers white glue and set the decal on it and pick up any residue with a Q-Tip.  

Any other tricks others are using?  
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne


--
Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Tim O'Connor
 


Future (clear acrylic liquid) has adhesive and self leveling qualities. And it can be built up in layers
if you're trying to hide the decal edge. After it dries cover with Dullcote or whatever. I keep a 2 oz
bottle and a brush on the work shelf


On 5/20/2022 5:00 PM, Charlie Duckworth wrote:

I’ve pick up a set of decals for light weights, scale and repack locations from Smokebox Graphics recently and want to add them to already finished models.  One method I’ve tried is to put down diluted Elmers white glue and set the decal on it and pick up any residue with a Q-Tip.  

Any other tricks others are using?  
--
Charlie Duckworth


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Charlie Duckworth
 

Many years ago MR had an article on putting down decals with diluted white glue.  I hadn’t tried it at the time but at one of our Missouri Pacific Historical Society annual meets Lee Freeman brought a scratch built O gauge T&P Muley caboose where he’d used the white glue technique.  The decals looked perfect.  


Here’s a CB&Q car I just finished and added Smokebox decals. I used their BCR decal first and then overlaid the weight and location using white glue.  The glue dries flat but I’m open to other suggestions; I’ve got a bottle of Future handy  


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


WILLIAM PARDIE
 

OK Gang:

How diluted is diluted white glue?

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...>
Date: 5/20/22 1:09 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Adding patches and light weights to finished models

Many years ago MR had an article on putting down decals with diluted white glue.  I hadn’t tried it at the time but at one of our Missouri Pacific Historical Society annual meets Lee Freeman brought a scratch built O gauge T&P Muley caboose where he’d used the white glue technique.  The decals looked perfect.  


Here’s a CB&Q car I just finished and added Smokebox decals. I used their BCR decal first and then overlaid the weight and location using white glue.  The glue dries flat but I’m open to other suggestions; I’ve got a bottle of Future handy  


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Charlie Duckworth
 

Bill
I’m probably using mostly water 60/40.  One question when using Future I assume by the property it leave a gloss coat. 

 I want to put down a decal patch of BCR that’s darker than the existing paint on the model followed by the weight, location and date.  I want to avoid changing the base color of the carbody. 

Charlie 

On Fri, May 20, 2022 at 6:13 PM WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:
OK Gang:

How diluted is diluted white glue?

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...>
Date: 5/20/22 1:09 PM (GMT-10:00)
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Adding patches and light weights to finished models

Many years ago MR had an article on putting down decals with diluted white glue.  I hadn’t tried it at the time but at one of our Missouri Pacific Historical Society annual meets Lee Freeman brought a scratch built O gauge T&P Muley caboose where he’d used the white glue technique.  The decals looked perfect.  


Here’s a CB&Q car I just finished and added Smokebox decals. I used their BCR decal first and then overlaid the weight and location using white glue.  The glue dries flat but I’m open to other suggestions; I’ve got a bottle of Future handy  


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Edward
 

Just a note here.
\When a car is reweighed and re-stenciled, both the LDLMT and LTWT are done, along with the weigh station's code and date. 
Those two measurements are interrelated and based on the carrying capacity of the journals in the trucks.

For example, a 100,000 LB capacity 40' car has a combined LD LMT and LT WT of 169,000 LBS minus the LT WT to get the stenciled LD LMT amount.
So, when adding LD LMT and LT WT together, you get the maximum rating for the journals.

There is a chart that tells the maximum lading is for various sized journal bearings.
A larger journal size for a 100,000 LB capacity could be 177,000 LBS.

On re-stenciling, the patch would contain the numbers for LD LMT and LT WT with the weigh code and date is a fresher patch and is sometimes done on a non-matching paint field, especially if re-weighed off the home road.
Ed Bommer
 


Bruce Smith
 

Ed,

Indeed, and as we have oft discussed here, a limited but real number of those reweighs occurred offline and so should have a "foreign" reweigh station code when compared to the owner of the car (about 10%). 

The paint out/re-stencil also varied. It could be the entire block (sometime, but rarely including the CAPY lettering and data), it could be the entire data for LT WT and LD LMT, or it could be just the last 3, or 4 digits of the LT WT and LD LMT (typically, the last 3, since weight to the nearest 100 lbs is what counted but if the LT WT of the car was near 100 or 900 in the last 3 digits, a change down or up, respectively, could generate a change in the 4th from last digit). As a consequence, when a LT WT is in that range, I will occasionally reflect that with a 4 digit block of re-stenciled data.

And of course, I make sure that my LT WT and LD LMT always add up to the correct max weight for the bearings/axles, unless the car is specially labeled to a fixed LD LMT (typically starred).

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Edward <edb8381@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 21, 2022 8:44 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Adding patches and light weights to finished models
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Just a note here.
\When a car is reweighed and re-stenciled, both the LDLMT and LTWT are done, along with the weigh station's code and date. 
Those two measurements are interrelated and based on the carrying capacity of the journals in the trucks.

For example, a 100,000 LB capacity 40' car has a combined LD LMT and LT WT of 169,000 LBS minus the LT WT to get the stenciled LD LMT amount.
So, when adding LD LMT and LT WT together, you get the maximum rating for the journals.

There is a chart that tells the maximum lading is for various sized journal bearings.
A larger journal size for a 100,000 LB capacity could be 177,000 LBS.

On re-stenciling, the patch would contain the numbers for LD LMT and LT WT with the weigh code and date is a fresher patch and is sometimes done on a non-matching paint field, especially if re-weighed off the home road.
Ed Bommer
 


Tim O'Connor
 


In 1963 the standard 2x4-wheel trucks 169000 GRL (LDLMT+LTWT) was increased to 177000.

Yes, the GRL categories are based on journal size.


On 5/21/2022 9:44 AM, Edward wrote:
Just a note here.
\When a car is reweighed and re-stenciled, both the LDLMT and LTWT are done, along with the weigh station's code and date. 
Those two measurements are interrelated and based on the carrying capacity of the journals in the trucks.

For example, a 100,000 LB capacity 40' car has a combined LD LMT and LT WT of 169,000 LBS minus the LT WT to get the stenciled LD LMT amount.
So, when adding LD LMT and LT WT together, you get the maximum rating for the journals.

There is a chart that tells the maximum lading is for various sized journal bearings.
A larger journal size for a 100,000 LB capacity could be 177,000 LBS.

On re-stenciling, the patch would contain the numbers for LD LMT and LT WT with the weigh code and date is a fresher patch and is sometimes done on a non-matching paint field, especially if re-weighed off the home road.
Ed Bommer

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, May 21, 2022 at 06:44 AM, Edward wrote:
Just a note here.
\When a car is reweighed and re-stenciled, both the LDLMT and LTWT are done, along with the weigh station's code and date. 
Those two measurements are interrelated and based on the carrying capacity of the journals in the trucks.
I hope you're not saying that this was always the case, as this seems to imply. If the weight hadn't changed by more than a set amount (which I'll leave to somebody else to look up) the figures weren't changed at all, only the date and station symbol.

Dennis Storzek


Dave Parker
 

As of 1917, the threshold weight change requiring a restencil was 300 lbs (500 for reefers).

I don't know if this ever changed prior to 1960.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Edward
 

Cars were-re-weighed following repairs, reconditioning, getting replacement trucks or wheels which increases their weight.
Cars lose weight as they are used, so they are re-weighed on a scheduled basis to check on that as well.

Ed Bommer