Topics

An unusual car - compressed gas


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,

An unusual car - compressed gas? Photo was taken on the SP. Nothing to provide a date other than the automobiles.

Image is mirror reversed.

Anyone care to share some insights?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12330940283/sizes/o/in/photostream/

- Claus Schlund


 

Looks like one of the first style helium cars, I think.

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: Claus Schlund HGM <claus@hellgatemodels.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Monday, February 10, 2014 at 3:10 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] An unusual car - compressed gas







Hi List Members,

An unusual car - compressed gas? Photo was taken on the SP. Nothing to
provide a date other than the automobiles.

Image is mirror reversed.

Anyone care to share some insights?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12330940283/sizes/o/in/photostr
eam/

- Claus Schlund









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Bruce Smith
 

Claus,

It looks very similar to the early 3-tube helium cars.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."


On Feb 10, 2014, at 3:10 PM, Claus Schlund HGM wrote:

Hi List Members,

An unusual car - compressed gas? Photo was taken on the SP. Nothing to provide a date other than the automobiles.

Image is mirror reversed.

Anyone care to share some insights?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12330940283/sizes/o/in/photostream/

 -  Claus Schlund


Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

They didn't call it the Gaslight era for nothing!!!

Tony Thompson's SP freight cars Vol 5, p260-262..
http://www.signaturepress.com/thompson/SPF5.html
Pintsch gas tanks on old CS flat car... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pintsch_gas

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

At 01:10 PM 2/10/2014, Claus Schlund HGM wrote:
An unusual car - compressed gas? Photo was taken on the SP. Nothing to provide a date other than the automobiles.
Image is mirror reversed.

Anyone care to share some insights?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12330940283/sizes/o/in/photostream/


 

Come to think of it, this car lacks the tapered ends of the early helium car. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Feb 10, 2014, at 3:32 PM, Richard Brennan <brennan8@...> wrote:

 

They didn't call it the Gaslight era for nothing!!!

Tony Thompson's SP freight cars Vol 5, p260-262..
http://www.signaturepress.com/thompson/SPF5.html
Pintsch gas tanks on old CS flat
car... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pintsch_gas

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

At 01:10 PM 2/10/2014, Claus Schlund HGM wrote:
>An unusual car - compressed gas? Photo was taken on the SP. Nothing
>to provide a date other than the automobiles.
>Image is mirror reversed.
>
>Anyone care to share some insights?
>
>http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12330940283/sizes/o/in/photostream/


Charlie Vlk
 

Claus-

Looks like a car used to carry gas for Pintsch passenger car lighting.   Just saw a similar Erie car posted somewhere where I think the poster said it was sourced from municipal gas works which I don’t think is correct as Pintsch gas was derived from distilled naphtha and I am not sure that is a byproduct of the coal/coke process used in such facilities.

Charlie Vlk


http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12330940283/sizes/o/in/photostream/

 


Tony Thompson
 

Richard Brennan wrote:

They didn't call it the Gaslight era for nothing!!!

Tony Thompson's SP freight cars Vol 5, p260-262..
http://www.signaturepress.com/thompson/SPF5.html
Pintsch gas tanks on old CS flat
car... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pintsch_gas


    Richard is exactly right. And BTW these are low-pressure tanks, NOT anything like helium tanks.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Steve SANDIFER
 

Very similar to 3-tube helium car, but not a helium car. Compressed gas sounds very viable.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
To:
Sent: Monday, February 10, 2014 3:24 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] An unusual car - compressed gas

 

Claus,


It looks very similar to the early 3-tube helium cars.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."


On Feb 10, 2014, at 3:10 PM, Claus Schlund HGM wrote:

Hi List Members,

An unusual car - compressed gas? Photo was taken on the SP. Nothing to provide a date other than the automobiles.

Image is mirror reversed.

Anyone care to share some insights?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12330940283/sizes/o/in/photostream/

 -  Claus Schlund


paul.doggett2472@...
 

It may well be in the UK we had similar cars  for towngas for coach lighting used to charge the passenger coaches with gas for gas lighting

Paul Doggett

UK


Barry Bennett
 

Someone commented earlier about Naptha. IIRC naptha was used in some gas works to enhance the calorific value of the gas produced, or perhaps to create other gas mixtures. I also have vague memories that acetylene gas was also used for lighting here in the UK so it may also have some use in US passenger car lighting.

Does anyone know what the actual gas was that passenger cars used, and which may well have been transported by the car in the photo. 

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.


On Tue, Feb 11, 2014 at 10:43 AM, <paul.doggett2472@...> wrote:
 

It may well be in the UK we had similar cars  for towngas for coach lighting used to charge the passenger coaches with gas for gas lighting

Paul Doggett

UK



Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <barrybennetttoo@...> wrote:

 I also have vague memories that acetylene gas was also used for lighting here in the UK so it may also have some use in US passenger car lighting.

Does anyone know what the actual gas was that passenger cars used, and which may well have been transported by the car in the photo. 

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.

While acetylene lighting equipment was sold for railroad car use in the US, the dominant player was Pintsch gas, made from naphtha. The two systems were not compatible, so roads tended to standardize on one or the other. Here is a link to a Scineticic American article about the production of Pintsch gas:

http://www.catskillarchive.com/rrextra/SDGAS.Html

Dennis Storzek


Barry Bennett
 

Dennis

Thanks very much for the link. It answers questions and creates others, inevitably.

Barry


On Tue, Feb 11, 2014 at 1:33 PM, <destorzek@...> wrote:
 




---In STMFC@..., wrote:

 I also have vague memories that acetylene gas was also used for lighting here in the UK so it may also have some use in US passenger car lighting.

Does anyone know what the actual gas was that passenger cars used, and which may well have been transported by the car in the photo. 

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.

While acetylene lighting equipment was sold for railroad car use in the US, the dominant player was Pintsch gas, made from naphtha. The two systems were not compatible, so roads tended to standardize on one or the other. Here is a link to a Scineticic American article about the production of Pintsch gas:

http://www.catskillarchive.com/rrextra/SDGAS.Html

Dennis Storzek



Malcolm H. Houck
 

Someone commented earlier about Naptha. IIRC naptha was used in some gas
works to enhance the calorific value of the gas produced, or perhaps to
create other gas mixtures. I also have vague memories that acetylene gas
was also used for lighting here in the UK so it may also have some use in
US passenger car lighting.

Does anyone know what the actual gas was that passenger cars used, and
which may well have been transported by the car in the photo.

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.
 
Naptha was the fuel used in the Pintsch Gas lighting
systems. That required a substantial infrastructure of
charging stations (not using freight cars for transport of
the gas generally - mandatory freight car content)
 and was therefore a reason that Pintsch gas usage
 did not gain a wide acceptance, The term Pintsch
gas has evolved to virtually a generic term when making
reference to methods of lighting with hydrocarbon fuel.
 
Acetylene was used for lighting in many applications
provided either from generators (tanks charged with
calcium carbide and water) at about 5 psi, or from
compressed gas cylinders. Locomotive headlamps
(pre-electrification) were acetylene fueled, as were
headlamps on  early pioneering automobiles and
motorcycles. 
 
Frost gas was also a popular usage to the end of
the 19th century. The fuel for Frost gas was gasoline
vapors from under car cylinders packed with cotton
waste and soaked with gasoline. It was popular to a
degree since a single charge would provide fuel
some period in excess of 100 hours; -- well exceeding
the duration of other hydrocarbon fuel usages.
 
Mal Houck


NicholasF
 

I've just flipped and cropped this photo if that can help anyone with the identification.

Take Care
-Nick Fry


spsalso
 

I just discovered this photo online:

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c0/fc/7d/c0fc7d934845175f17faf35fc4477561.jpg

There was no commentary that I could see.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Lloyd Keyser
 

Pinch gas is made by the railroad and is used for non electrified coach lights. Each car has a storage tank mounted underneath  which is filled before each run. Usually  you can see a gas line down the center of the roof connecting to each of the lamps.

On Sun, Mar 7, 2021 at 7:47 PM spsalso via groups.io <Edwardsutorik=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I just discovered this photo online:

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c0/fc/7d/c0fc7d934845175f17faf35fc4477561.jpg

There was no commentary that I could see.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


spsalso
 

And, my heavens, the same photo shows up on Fallen Flags:

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/cn/cn51845jpa.jpg


Ed

Edward Sutorik


 

Surprised to see one in service in 1961 (a year after this list’s end date). 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Mar 7, 2021, at 8:28 PM, spsalso via groups.io <Edwardsutorik@...> wrote:

And, my heavens, the same photo shows up on Fallen Flags:

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/cn/cn51845jpa.jpg


Ed

Edward Sutorik


 

Pintsch gas was use to light passenger cars at one point. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Mar 7, 2021, at 7:47 PM, spsalso via groups.io <Edwardsutorik@...> wrote:

I just discovered this photo online:

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c0/fc/7d/c0fc7d934845175f17faf35fc4477561.jpg

There was no commentary that I could see.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, Mar 7, 2021 at 06:42 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI wrote:
Surprised to see one in service in 1961 (a year after this list’s end date). 
It does seem rather late, but CN had lots of little branchlines where they had to continue passenger service. Electric lighting of passenger cars in this service was always problematic because the cars typically didn't run fast enough to fully recharge the batteries. A lot of roads this side of the border reverted to kerosene lamps in this service, the lightweight rib side cars the Milwaukee Road built during the thirties for this sort of service were built with kerosene lamps, The CN must have thought enough of the Pintsch system to keep their gas production plant in service, and therefore needed cars to deliver to outlying terminals.

More info: http://www.catskillarchive.com/rrextra/sdgas.Html

Dennis Storzek