Billboard Painting Prohibition. Was InterMountain HO Scale Two-Bay Hoppers (Re-Release)


Guy Wilber
 

Gary Ray wrote:

“Does anyone know the date of the banning? Also, how long were billboard cars allowed to run - was it just until they needed repainting? If memory serves me right, that would be about 7 years.”

The ICC’s (I & S Docket No. 3887) was decided on July 2, 1934. The regulations of the decision were published within Dearborn’s Perishable Protective Tariff, effective January 1, 1935.

Rule 36 of the tariff prohibited advertising on newly constructed refrigerator cars or those repainted after January 1, 1935.

Effective January 1, 1937, no refrigerator car bearing advertisements of any shipper, consignee or product was to be accepted in Interchange or handled locally on any railroad.

In 1936 The AAR’s Arbitration Committee added a new paragraph (6) to section (r) of Rule 3:

Refrigerator cars bearing advertisements of any shipper, consignee or product will not be accepted, effective January 1, 1937. In Interchange.

The effective date was extended to April 1, 1937.

The AAR’s Report of The Car Service Division (November 19, 1937) contained the following statement: “The removal of advertising of shipper, consignee, or product from refrigerator cars was accomplished as of April 1, 1937, in accordance with the arranged program.”

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


D. Scott Chatfield
 

And covered hoppers and tank cars were specifically exempted from the billboard ban.

Scott Chatfield


Edward
 

What about privately owned and operated refrigerator/ventilator cars.
Were they included in that interchange ban as well? 

Ed Bommer


fire5506
 

Interchange rules apply all cars interchanged between railroads, whether RR owned or privately owned.

Richard Webster


Edward
 

Well then, when did this exclusive prohibition of refrigerator cars bearing product names relax?
I am thinking of Manufacturer's Railway Service Ralston-Purina checkerboard insulated/ventilated cars, Swift and Armour meat refrigerators with their names on the car sides?
These were running in the 1940's and '50's, carrying the shippers and/or product names.

Ed Bommer 


Tim O'Connor
 

Ed

It's pretty simple, really. Ask yourself whether a *leased* car (owned by lessor X) could be loaded
with Vendor A's products but still carry advertising for Vendor B's competitive product. If  THAT  were
true, then Vendor A had a legitimate complaint. This was why those rules were made! I'm not sure that
the rules were ever un-made. Instead the practice ceased. Advertising continued to appear on freight
cars in cases where there was no conflict of interest.

Tim O'Connor


On 7/25/2021 10:59 AM, Edward wrote:

Well then, when did this exclusive prohibition of refrigerator cars bearing product names relax?
I am thinking of Manufacturer's Railway Service Ralston-Purina checkerboard insulated/ventilated cars, Swift and Armour meat refrigerators with their names on the car sides?
These were running in the 1940's and '50's, carrying the shippers and/or product names.

Ed Bommer


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Brian Carlson
 

Ed. Leasees could still have limited product information on the cars including logos and service marks. Swift leased the cars so they complied.  It’s all explained in the prior messages. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Jul 25, 2021, at 10:59 AM, Edward <edb8381@...> wrote:



Well then, when did this exclusive prohibition of refrigerator cars bearing product names relax?
I am thinking of Manufacturer's Railway Service Ralston-Purina checkerboard insulated/ventilated cars, Swift and Armour meat refrigerators with their names on the car sides?
These were running in the 1940's and '50's, carrying the shippers and/or product names.

Ed Bommer 


Edward
 

I was trying to get more discussion of that point with my initial question.
Thank you for that!

Ed Bommer


Bill Parks
 

Well then, when did this exclusive prohibition of refrigerator cars bearing product names relax?
I am thinking of Manufacturer's Railway Service Ralston-Purina checkerboard insulated/ventilated cars, Swift and Armour meat refrigerators with their names on the car sides?
These were running in the 1940's and '50's, carrying the shippers and/or product names.

Ed - 

The ruling still allowed (allows) an exception for these.  Companies can still advertise, but there are a few restrictions.  One is they can only advertise their company name, not any specific product(s).  That is why you have Swift cars, but they just include the corporate name/logo, and not any specific product (e.g. Hams, Bacon).  Also, the cars have to be in captive service for the shipper that leases (or owns them) - resulting in them having to be returned as empties.

These rules are why today we see the Tropicana cars.  They only advertise the company, and are used only by Tropicana
--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Tony Thompson
 

Thanks, Guy, for the details on this.

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, Jul 25, 2021 at 10:27 AM, Bill Parks wrote:
Well then, when did this exclusive prohibition of refrigerator cars bearing product names relax?
I am thinking of Manufacturer's Railway Service Ralston-Purina checkerboard insulated/ventilated cars, Swift and Armour meat refrigerators with their names on the car sides?
These were running in the 1940's and '50's, carrying the shippers and/or product names.
We had a very extensive discussion about the "billboard reefer ban" back in 2014. View it here:
https://realstmfc.groups.io/g/main/topic/17252367#124611

The first thing to understand is it wasn't about shippers complaining about being offered cars with advertising painted on; it was about the railroads distaste for the reefer lease fleets, because while the railroads were obligated to maintain a fleet of reefers so they could supply a car if a load was offered, when a load in a lease car was offered, they had to pay car hire on the car, while the car they owned sat. It was quite a sore point during the twenties and early thirties.

While the ban did not cover owners names, it was rather ambiguous what could be construed as "advertising." Because of the fact that the remedy was refusal to accept the car in interchange, and this decision would be made multiple times during the cars trip, every time the car was interchanged between railroads, NOBODY wanted risk having a loaded car of meat or produce refused a thousand miles away from its point of origination, so initially NOBODY painted anything on the cars that could possibly be called advertising.

As time went on, the lease fleet issue receded, and after WWII cars began to sport colorful logos again, but from the late thirties through the war the freightcar fleet became very bland indeed.

Dennis Storzek