Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921
 
All three hoppers have had their road name and number airbrushed out.
 
The left-most car appears to be a PRR class GLa design. Note that, while it appears there is an air brake line visible on this car, I believe this is NOT an air brake line and is instead the light reflecting off the far rail under the car.
 
The other two cars are N&W hoppers - the N&W letters can still be faintly discerned on the middle car.
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Eric Hansmann
 

The two hoppers with external door mechanisms seem to follow N&W designs. I’m uncertain of the car on the left.

 

The Stonega Mine was located on the Interstate Railroad in far western Virginia. The left hopper could have a number of possible owners from the local connections. It could also be an Interstate car.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, May 14, 2021 10:06 AM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

Hi List Members,

 

Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

All three hoppers have had their road name and number airbrushed out.

 

The left-most car appears to be a PRR class GLa design. Note that, while it appears there is an air brake line visible on this car, I believe this is NOT an air brake line and is instead the light reflecting off the far rail under the car.

 

The other two cars are N&W hoppers - the N&W letters can still be faintly discerned on the middle car.

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Eric,
 
I will add that Interstate had both PRR GLa copies and also had dimensionally TALLER PRR GLa copies (that were maybe 10 inches taller than a normal PRR GLa car)
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, May 14, 2021 11:45 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

The two hoppers with external door mechanisms seem to follow N&W designs. I’m uncertain of the car on the left.

 

The Stonega Mine was located on the Interstate Railroad in far western Virginia. The left hopper could have a number of possible owners from the local connections. It could also be an Interstate car.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, May 14, 2021 10:06 AM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

Hi List Members,

 

Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

All three hoppers have had their road name and number airbrushed out.

 

The left-most car appears to be a PRR class GLa design. Note that, while it appears there is an air brake line visible on this car, I believe this is NOT an air brake line and is instead the light reflecting off the far rail under the car.

 

The other two cars are N&W hoppers - the N&W letters can still be faintly discerned on the middle car.

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 


Eric Hansmann
 

There’s also some lens distortion on the left car. The ladder grabs are similar to what I’ve seen on old BC&G cars. The end posts seem right for a GLa design.

 

I think I see remnants of a small size INTERSTATE stencil in the panel below the weigh data. Zoom in tight near the sill on that panel.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, May 14, 2021 11:50 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

Hi Eric,

 

I will add that Interstate had both PRR GLa copies and also had dimensionally TALLER PRR GLa copies (that were maybe 10 inches taller than a normal PRR GLa car)

 

Claus Schlund

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, May 14, 2021 11:45 AM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

The two hoppers with external door mechanisms seem to follow N&W designs. I’m uncertain of the car on the left.

 

The Stonega Mine was located on the Interstate Railroad in far western Virginia. The left hopper could have a number of possible owners from the local connections. It could also be an Interstate car.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, May 14, 2021 10:06 AM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

Hi List Members,

 

Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

All three hoppers have had their road name and number airbrushed out.

 

The left-most car appears to be a PRR class GLa design. Note that, while it appears there is an air brake line visible on this car, I believe this is NOT an air brake line and is instead the light reflecting off the far rail under the car.

 

The other two cars are N&W hoppers - the N&W letters can still be faintly discerned on the middle car.

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Eric and List Members,
 
When I zoom in and inspect the area under the weight data, the last line seems to me to read STANDARD. But don't get me wrong, I'm not disputing that this may be an INTERSTATE car.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, May 14, 2021 1:01 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

There’s also some lens distortion on the left car. The ladder grabs are similar to what I’ve seen on old BC&G cars. The end posts seem right for a GLa design.

 

I think I see remnants of a small size INTERSTATE stencil in the panel below the weigh data. Zoom in tight near the sill on that panel.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, May 14, 2021 11:50 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

Hi Eric,

 

I will add that Interstate had both PRR GLa copies and also had dimensionally TALLER PRR GLa copies (that were maybe 10 inches taller than a normal PRR GLa car)

 

Claus Schlund

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, May 14, 2021 11:45 AM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

The two hoppers with external door mechanisms seem to follow N&W designs. I’m uncertain of the car on the left.

 

The Stonega Mine was located on the Interstate Railroad in far western Virginia. The left hopper could have a number of possible owners from the local connections. It could also be an Interstate car.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, May 14, 2021 10:06 AM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

Hi List Members,

 

Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

All three hoppers have had their road name and number airbrushed out.

 

The left-most car appears to be a PRR class GLa design. Note that, while it appears there is an air brake line visible on this car, I believe this is NOT an air brake line and is instead the light reflecting off the far rail under the car.

 

The other two cars are N&W hoppers - the N&W letters can still be faintly discerned on the middle car.

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 


David
 

Gla-type hopper on the left is Clinchfield, center car is N&W class HP, and the car on the right is N&W class HM.

David Thompson


Philip Dove
 

You have overlooked a scenic detail. The slag (coal mine waste) heap behind is smouldering and has problems with spontaneous combustion. Note the smoke. 

Sent from my Huawei phone


-------- Original message --------
From: "David via groups.io" <jaydeet2001@...>
Date: Sat, 15 May 2021, 02:23
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921
Gla-type hopper on the left is Clinchfield, center car is N&W class HP,
and the car on the right is N&W class HM.

David Thompson







kevinhlafferty
 

Is that a slag heap or a subterranean fire?

 

Kevin L.

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Philip Dove
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 8:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

You have overlooked a scenic detail. The slag (coal mine waste) heap behind is smouldering and has problems with spontaneous combustion. Note the smoke. 

Sent from my Huawei phone



-------- Original message --------
From: "David via groups.io" <jaydeet2001@...>
Date: Sat, 15 May 2021, 02:23
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

Gla-type hopper on the left is Clinchfield, center car is N&W class HP,
and the car on the right is N&W class HM.

David Thompson






Nelson Moyer
 

I think we need to clarify the definition of slag. It’s a smelting byproduct, not coal mine waste. I pasted in the Wikipedia definition.

 

Slag is the glass-like by-product left over after a desired metal has been separated (i.e., smelted) from its raw ore. Slag is usually a mixture of metal oxides and silicon dioxide.

 

 

As such, slag can’t burn or it would be consumed in the smelting process.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of kevinhlafferty
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 9:01 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

Is that a slag heap or a subterranean fire?

 

Kevin L.

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Philip Dove
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 8:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

You have overlooked a scenic detail. The slag (coal mine waste) heap behind is smouldering and has problems with spontaneous combustion. Note the smoke. 

Sent from my Huawei phone



-------- Original message --------
From: "David via groups.io" <jaydeet2001@...>
Date: Sat, 15 May 2021, 02:23
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

Gla-type hopper on the left is Clinchfield, center car is N&W class HP,
and the car on the right is N&W class HM.

David Thompson





Eric Hansmann
 

I would agree. But I think there is a regional aspect to the piles of coal mining waste. I grew up in western Pennsylvania where bony pile was a common term, as well as slag pile. I’ve heard culm bank used in Eastern Pennsylvania. 

This is one of those objects that may have different descriptive words just like pop, soda, and Coke can describe carbonated soft drinks around the US. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On May 16, 2021, at 10:48 AM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

I think we need to clarify the definition of slag. It’s a smelting byproduct, not coal mine waste. I pasted in the Wikipedia definition.

 

Slag is the glass-like by-product left over after a desired metal has been separated (i.e., smelted) from its raw ore. Slag is usually a mixture of metal oxides and silicon dioxide.

 

 

As such, slag can’t burn or it would be consumed in the smelting process.

 

Nelson Moyer

 


Nelson Moyer
 

In Southern Illinois around the CB&Q owned and served coal mines, it was referred to as a gob or gobe pile. I maintain that there isn’t any slag in coal mining waste regardless of what it’s called. Language is precise, but that doesn’t stop language abuse. Too bad Richard isn’t here to inform us about linguistics.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 10:58 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

I would agree. But I think there is a regional aspect to the piles of coal mining waste. I grew up in western Pennsylvania where bony pile was a common term, as well as slag pile. I’ve heard culm bank used in Eastern Pennsylvania. 

 

This is one of those objects that may have different descriptive words just like pop, soda, and Coke can describe carbonated soft drinks around the US. 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On May 16, 2021, at 10:48 AM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

I think we need to clarify the definition of slag. It’s a smelting byproduct, not coal mine waste. I pasted in the Wikipedia definition.

 

Slag is the glass-like by-product left over after a desired metal has been separated (i.e., smelted) from its raw ore. Slag is usually a mixture of metal oxides and silicon dioxide.

 

 

As such, slag can’t burn or it would be consumed in the smelting process.

 

Nelson Moyer

 


kevinhlafferty
 

Slag, no, slag heap, yes. A quick search of multiple dictionaries will turn up the following definition:

 

slag heap


noun

a hillock of waste matter from coal mining, etc

 

Kevin L.

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 11:17 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

In Southern Illinois around the CB&Q owned and served coal mines, it was referred to as a gob or gobe pile. I maintain that there isn’t any slag in coal mining waste regardless of what it’s called. Language is precise, but that doesn’t stop language abuse. Too bad Richard isn’t here to inform us about linguistics.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 10:58 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

I would agree. But I think there is a regional aspect to the piles of coal mining waste. I grew up in western Pennsylvania where bony pile was a common term, as well as slag pile. I’ve heard culm bank used in Eastern Pennsylvania. 

 

This is one of those objects that may have different descriptive words just like pop, soda, and Coke can describe carbonated soft drinks around the US. 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On May 16, 2021, at 10:48 AM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

I think we need to clarify the definition of slag. It’s a smelting byproduct, not coal mine waste. I pasted in the Wikipedia definition.

 

Slag is the glass-like by-product left over after a desired metal has been separated (i.e., smelted) from its raw ore. Slag is usually a mixture of metal oxides and silicon dioxide.

 

 

As such, slag can’t burn or it would be consumed in the smelting process.

 

Nelson Moyer

 


Nelson Moyer
 

That makes about a much sense as calling a pile of coal a shale heap.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of kevinhlafferty
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 12:11 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

Slag, no, slag heap, yes. A quick search of multiple dictionaries will turn up the following definition:

 

slag heap


noun

a hillock of waste matter from coal mining, etc

 

Kevin L.

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 11:17 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

In Southern Illinois around the CB&Q owned and served coal mines, it was referred to as a gob or gobe pile. I maintain that there isn’t any slag in coal mining waste regardless of what it’s called. Language is precise, but that doesn’t stop language abuse. Too bad Richard isn’t here to inform us about linguistics.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 10:58 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Block coal ready for shipment from Stonega Mine 1921

 

I would agree. But I think there is a regional aspect to the piles of coal mining waste. I grew up in western Pennsylvania where bony pile was a common term, as well as slag pile. I’ve heard culm bank used in Eastern Pennsylvania. 

 

This is one of those objects that may have different descriptive words just like pop, soda, and Coke can describe carbonated soft drinks around the US. 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On May 16, 2021, at 10:48 AM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

I think we need to clarify the definition of slag. It’s a smelting byproduct, not coal mine waste. I pasted in the Wikipedia definition.

 

Slag is the glass-like by-product left over after a desired metal has been separated (i.e., smelted) from its raw ore. Slag is usually a mixture of metal oxides and silicon dioxide.

 

 

As such, slag can’t burn or it would be consumed in the smelting process.

 

Nelson Moyer

 


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, May 16, 2021 at 10:57 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:
That makes about a much sense as calling a pile of coal a shale heap.
Just because you've never heard it, doesn't mean it's incorrect.

From the Collins dictionary https://www.collinsdictionary.com/us/dictionary/english/slag
3. 
a mixture of shaleclay, coal dust, and other mineral waste produced during coal mining

From the Cambridge dictionary https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/slag

waste material produced when coal is dug from the ground, or a substance produced by mixing chemicals with metal that has been heated until it is liquid in order to remove unwanted substances from it

Need I go on? It does seem to be British usage, likely took root here in the colonies wherever Cornish miners settled.

Dennis Storzek