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Boxcar Dimension Questions for a Decal Project


Matt Goodman
 

All, 

My father recently got the itch to reproduce a 1907 American Strawboard boxcar (as seen here and here) and has given me the job of researching decals.

I used Photoshop Element’s perspective crop tool (learned from Ted Culotta’s Lightroom clinic and discussion on this forum - thanks!) to straighten the image at the first link, with I thought decent results (see first attached image). The second image, when straightened with the same tool turned out oddly compressed left to right. I spoke to my son (UX developer/designer) and brother (graphic artist) about this, and both were initially perplexed about the result (see the second image).

With that background, here’s my question. I can fix the second image by specifying the ratio of height to length when using the perspective crop tool - if I have dimensions.

Length
  • Is the 36’ dimension for this car the inside length, the outside “box” length or over the strike plates?
  • Is there a standard dimension for the siding board width? 

Height
  • Is there a standard door-opening height?
  • Is there a known/standard sheathing height?
  • As a stand-in for the second point, what is the inside height of these cars? It’s not listed on the car side.

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio, US



earlyrail
 

Found the American Straw Board in the April 1908 ORER
No dimensions
series 1-25 and 101-107
Listed under United Box Board and Paper Co.
Same info updated Sept 1908
Same info updated July 1909 listed  in Aug 1910 ORER
Listed in index Dec 1911 - could not locate
Gone from the Dec 1912 ORER

Howard Garner



Matt Goodman
 

Thanks for the help Howard.

On Aug 20, 2020, at 3:00 PM, earlyrail <cascaderail@...> wrote:

Found the American Straw Board in the April 1908 ORER
No dimensions
series 1-25 and 101-107
Listed under United Box Board and Paper Co.
Same info updated Sept 1908
Same info updated July 1909 listed  in Aug 1910 ORER
Listed in index Dec 1911 - could not locate
Gone from the Dec 1912 ORER

Howard Garner




Dave Parker
 

Matt:

At that time, T&G V-groove siding was either 3-1/4 or 2-5/8; the latter was actually 5-1/4 siding with a V-grove down the middle of the board.  My sense is that the 3-1/4 was far more common.

I usually check against a known length, like an 18" grab.  Or you can use the known/ approximate length of the car.  The difference between the two siding types is large enough (24% of the narrower spacing) that it is pretty easy to figure out what's on the car.

Hope this helps.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Matt Goodman
 

That advice and information helps a great deal. Thanks Dave.

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio, US

On Aug 21, 2020, at 12:04 AM, Dave Parker via groups.io <spottab@...> wrote:

Matt:

At that time, T&G V-groove siding was either 3-1/4 or 2-5/8; the latter was actually 5-1/4 siding with a V-grove down the middle of the board.  My sense is that the 3-1/4 was far more common.

I usually check against a known length, like an 18" grab.  Or you can use the known/ approximate length of the car.  The difference between the two siding types is large enough (24% of the narrower spacing) that it is pretty easy to figure out what's on the car.

Hope this helps.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA