Brake Levers/Rods Arrangement and Attachment


Charles Greene
 

I'm assembling a late 19-teens/early 1920s-vintage USRA-design twin-bay hopper with split-K brake gear. The prototype photos I've found are only views of the ends, sides and inside of these cars. Consequently, as far as levers are concerned, I can only see the "live" cylinder lever, one end of which is attached directly to the cylinder piston end. The other end angles down toward the bottom of a bolster. Logically, a rod must be attached to that end of this lever and pass through the bolster. That rod then must actuate the rest of the system, viz. the "floating" lever and other rods to the brake beams. To correctly model this thing I need to know how and where the other lever and rods are attached to the underside of the car. 

I've contacted the Museum of Transportation near St. Louis which has holdings of American Car and Foundry diagrams of these cars. A staff member there is searching to see if this brake detail is shown in any of the diagrams. That project is taking some time, so.....meanwhile.....I thought I'd see if anyone here has any pertinent information/photo/diagram.

            -Chuck


lrkdbn
 

On the original USRA hoppers the cyl. lever was at a 45 degree angle and then bent down parallel to the side of the ctr sill. It connected to a horizontal lever just inside the bolster. From there a rod ran parallel to the ctr sill to another similar lever inside the other bolster. The handbrake connected to the bottom of the cyl lever.Here are some NPS Steamtown pictures of a DL&W car. Also check out the New York Central HS website photo collection they have many pictures of these cars.(Note that the NYC also had many USRA"clones" with a different and more straightforward brake arrangement.) The train air pipe on the original USRA hoppers was also a little different in that it crossed over the top of the center sill at the A end of the car, then ran along the bottom of the side to the B end ,then jogged inward only a little at the B end bolster, then finished in a wide radius bend ending in an elbow fitting at the air hose bracket.The pictures make this clear.Good Luck!
Larry King


lrkdbn
 

Here are a couple more watermarked images from the NYCSHS web site showing the setup of the brake lever and the way the train air pipe crossed at the A end of the car You can buy hi res images from the NYCSHS for a small price
Larry King.


Charles Greene
 

Larry,

Thanks for reply and photos....

In fact, I think the prototype photos I mentioned were the same ones you cited from the NYCHS website (https://nycshs.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/usranycshoppers.pdf), but they don't include underside views. 

You describe some of the rod and lever system, so apparently you've actually taken a look under a car somewhere (?).  Think you could translate your recollection into a simple drawing and e-mail it to me?

      -Chuck



On Wed, May 26, 2021 at 4:29 PM lrkdbn via groups.io <lrkdbn=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Here are a couple more watermarked images from the NYCSHS web site showing the setup of the brake lever and the way the train air pipe crossed at the A end of the car You can buy hi res images from the NYCSHS for a small price
Larry King.


lrkdbn
 

I'm sorry I'm not set up to scan stuff so I can't send you a sketch,,but i would say to look at the picture I sent of the overturned Frisco hopper. Just above the truck you can see the horizontal lever and its hangers.There would be a similar lever at the other end with a fulcrum bracket. I have never worried about the exact configuration of this because, located between the wheels as it is, unless your'e modeling finescale you can only model the center part of the levers and the connecting rod on account of wheel clearance.It occurs to me another source of actual brake arrangement drawings is Bob Webber at the Illinois Railway Museum.His email is <cz17@...>
Larry King


Steve and Barb Hile
 

Chuck,

 

You may want to get in touch with us at the Pullman Library at IRM.  irmpulllib@...

 

We have lots of early freight car drawings already scanned.  This includes Standard Steel Car, who built many USRA design hoppers into the 1920’s.  We do have some of the USRA drawings, as well, including 1293 which shows the brake arrangement for the 70 ton hopper.

 

Steve Hile, Volunteer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Charles Greene
Sent: Tuesday, May 25, 2021 6:45 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Brake Levers/Rods Arrangement and Attachment

 

I'm assembling a late 19-teens/early 1920s-vintage USRA-design twin-bay hopper with split-K brake gear. The prototype photos I've found are only views of the ends, sides and inside of these cars. Consequently, as far as levers are concerned, I can only see the "live" cylinder lever, one end of which is attached directly to the cylinder piston end. The other end angles down toward the bottom of a bolster. Logically, a rod must be attached to that end of this lever and pass through the bolster. That rod then must actuate the rest of the system, viz. the "floating" lever and other rods to the brake beams. To correctly model this thing I need to know how and where the other lever and rods are attached to the underside of the car. 

 

I've contacted the Museum of Transportation near St. Louis which has holdings of American Car and Foundry diagrams of these cars. A staff member there is searching to see if this brake detail is shown in any of the diagrams. That project is taking some time, so.....meanwhile.....I thought I'd see if anyone here has any pertinent information/photo/diagram.

 

            -Chuck


Danny Inmon
 


Charles Greene
 

Thanks, Danny.....a peek inside one of those might reveal what I want....

        -Chuck