Topics

Brass freight car noise - NOT TRUCKS


James SANDIFER
 

Will someone please address the question? Yes, I have replaced the trucks, as stated in the original question. I want to quiet down the tin sound of brass cars. Any suggestions on making them quiet?

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of James SANDIFER
Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 11:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Brass freight car noise

 

I have a number of brass freight cars that make "brass" noise. I have replaced the trucks on virtually all so they roll well. What is the best way to quiet them down?


mark_landgraf
 

You might try, for a boxcar, packing it with foam rubber. If you are really desperate, fill the car with non expanding spray foam. Given the sloppiness of using spray foam, I would do it on a painted car. Clean-up is with acetone.  Packing a car with fiberglass insulation may also work.  Automotive spray undercutting would probably work too. 

Fiber wasters between the truck bolster and the car bolster would probably help too. 

Mark Landgraf
Albany NY


On Wed, Aug 26, 2020 at 6:23 PM, James SANDIFER
<steve.sandifer@...> wrote:

Will someone please address the question? Yes, I have replaced the trucks, as stated in the original question. I want to quiet down the tin sound of brass cars. Any suggestions on making them quiet?

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of James SANDIFER
Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 11:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Brass freight car noise

 

I have a number of brass freight cars that make "brass" noise. I have replaced the trucks on virtually all so they roll well. What is the best way to quiet them down?


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Mark,

Foam rubber, or artificial foam as is more likely, might quiet such a car. However, both materials deteriorate with age and become flakey, making a potential mess. White styrofoam blocks carefully cut to fill the car might be more stable.

Non-expanding spray foam is messy, and the solvents in the foam could dissolve some plastics, as does acetone. I used acetone to clean some used archery bows I bought for our loaner kit, and found it temporarily softened fiberglass or the acrylic plastic, though eventually it hardened again without serious damage.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆



On Wed, Aug 26, 2020 at 6:34 PM mark_landgraf via groups.io <mark_landgraf=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
You might try, for a boxcar, packing it with foam rubber. If you are really desperate, fill the car with non expanding spray foam. Given the sloppiness of using spray foam, I would do it on a painted car. Clean-up is with acetone.  Packing a car with fiberglass insulation may also work.  Automotive spray undercutting would probably work too. 

Fiber wasters between the truck bolster and the car bolster would probably help too. 

Mark Landgraf
Albany NY


On Wed, Aug 26, 2020 at 6:23 PM, James SANDIFER

Will someone please address the question? Yes, I have replaced the trucks, as stated in the original question. I want to quiet down the tin sound of brass cars. Any suggestions on making them quiet?

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of James SANDIFER
Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 11:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Brass freight car noise

 

I have a number of brass freight cars that make "brass" noise. I have replaced the trucks on virtually all so they roll well. What is the best way to quiet them down?


Chad Boas
 

You could try Dynamat. They use it in cars under the carpet to keep out road noise. You can get a small sheet for around $30. That would be enough to do a fleet of brass cars.
Chad


Gary McMills
 

Hi James,

Try one of the thin Kadee fiber washers between the truck and the freight car bolster to deaden the noise.

best,

Gary McMills93

 


On 2020-08-26 17:23, James SANDIFER wrote:

 

Will someone please address the question? Yes, I have replaced the trucks, as stated in the original question. I want to quiet down the tin sound of brass cars. Any suggestions on making them quiet?

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of James SANDIFER
Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 11:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Brass freight car noise

 

I have a number of brass freight cars that make "brass" noise. I have replaced the trucks on virtually all so they roll well. What is the best way to quiet them down?

 


Edward
 
Edited

The problem is that a brass car, especially a box car is, in the reality of physics, an empty metal 'can' on wheels. 
As such it audibly magnifies any drumming disturbances pick up when rolling along, like a speaker.
The denser pink or blue styrofoam used for insulation cut into blocks that fit snugly inside over the trucks help reduce that effect.
It should fit against the floor, car end and both walls for maximum deadening. 
It need not be very tall.
The area where a door could be open can remain clear. 
Best to make any sound deadening easy to remove and not alter the car in any way.
To hide these blocks if seen, end covers can be made to resemble loads held in place with retainers.
I've done some sound deadening with brass hopper cars, fitting in a sheet of dense styrofoam under the coal load, making certain it touches both sides and both ends.
However a brass stock car could be a challenge. Maybe a thin sheet of styrofoam  fitted the floor, over which some straw could be glued? 
One plus, its open sides are less likely to resonate as much as those on a fully enclosed car. 

Ed Bommer


Bruce Smith
 

I might (half seriously) suggest obtaining a set of noise cancelling headphones. You could then take the guts of said headphones and install them within the offending boxcar. I believe that they are 12 volt, and so could be wired to run off of track power if you so decided. Alternatively, you could run them off of batteries and only turn them on when the car was running. ;)

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Charlie Vlk
 

How about stuffing in a block cut to size to fit the inside. Another way would be to use mastic like is used for lining fuel tanks or truck beds but I don't think it would be more effective than the soft foam and would be a mess and hard to get off if you wanted to return the model to factory condition.
Flat cars, gondolas and hoppers would have to get a load of some sort to dampen noise and the more mass probably the better.
Charlie Vlk

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 11:30 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Brass freight car noise - NOT TRUCKS

I might (half seriously) suggest obtaining a set of noise cancelling headphones. You could then take the guts of said headphones and install them within the offending boxcar. I believe that they are 12 volt, and so could be wired to run off of track power if you so decided. Alternatively, you could run them off of batteries and only turn them on when the car was running. ;)

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Ed and Friends,

Richard Hendrickson used blocks of styrofoam randomly carved on top into rounded shapes to simulate sheep in one of his two-deck Mather stock cars. The effect was pretty good. See page 15 in the May 1997 RAILMODEL JOURNAL.

Maybe this would also work as a sound deadener in a brass two-deck stock car. Of course, you would have to do both decks to look right.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


On Thu, Aug 27, 2020 at 12:22 PM Edward <edb8381@...> wrote:
The problem is that a brass car, especially a box car is, in the reality of physics, an empty metal 'can' on wheels. 
As such it audibly magnifies any drumming disturbances pick up when rolling along, like a speaker.
The denser pink or blue styrofoam used for insulation cut into blocks that fit snugly inside over the trucks help reduce that effect.
It should fit against the floor and both walls for maximum deadening. 
The area where a door could be open can remain clear. 
Best to make any sound deadening easy to remove and not alter the car in any way.
To hide these blocks if seen, end covers can be made to resemble loads held in place with retainers.
I've done some sound deadening with brass hopper cars, fitting in a sheet of dense styrofoam under the coal load, making certain it touches both sides and both ends.
However a brass stock car could be a challenge. Maybe a thin sheet of styrofoam  fitted the floor, over which some straw could be glued? 
One plus, its open sides are less likely to resonate as much as those on a fully enclosed car. 

Ed Bommer


Andy Carlson
 


Years ago I had a model railroader friend who was annoyed by the sound box vibrations from his brass fleet. I suggested aquarium Silicone caulk applied inside the car body in an 'X' pattern on each side of the door.

He later told me he was satisfied 100% with the results.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


_._,_._,_


steve_wintner
 

Loudspeakers are often stuffed with fibrous batting. Crutchfield, for one, sells it. I'm sure others do too. I'd expect cotton or wool to serve, cheaply, and not degrade for a few decades. 

Steve