Topics

Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT


Gary Roe
 

Admittedly, this post is not about Steam Era Freight Car models; but the transportation and/or storage of same.

I do not have a layout, so virtually all of my models 'live' in a box.....usually the one they came in.  Once they are built, painted, and weathered, in my mind it is not preferable to stick them back in a box unprotected.  I recently 'discovered' something that I think is the answer; but knowing my luck, it will probably be detrimental to the model and/or its finish.  That's why I seek the advice of someone who knows.

The material I was thinking of using is a very thin, very soft, pliable plastic.  The source is my grocery store.  It is the bags they have in dispensers in the fruits and vegetables section.  I can find nothing that tells what kind of plastic it is, only that it is classified as a No. 2 Recyclable, and made by Unistar Plastics.

Will this stuff end up adhering itself to my models, or perform some other regrettable act of violence toward them?

Thanks in advance for tolerance of this subject, and any insight.

gary roe
quincy, illinois


John Sykes III
 

LDPE at my local Publix.  Beware that some of them have an additive (ethylene oxide??) to keep fruits and veggies fresh longer (usually green colored).  That could react with some model paints unfavorably.


John Sykes III
 

Error in my above reply.  Ethylene oxide actually forces ripening of fruits and veggies, I believe the additive in the bags does the opposite, slows it down.


al_brown03
 

I usually wrap models in bubble wrap; I've never had it interact with the paint.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Dave Parker
 

Ethylene, not ethylene oxide, promotes ripening in fruits and vegetable.  Rather different molecules, with rather different safety issues.  The former does enjoy some use in forcing ripening in commercial storage, but there are also methods for lowering its concentration in produce warehouses to prolong storage life.

You may be conflating ethylene and nitric oxide.  NO gas counters the effect of ethylene and delays ripening, but I haven't seen any evidence that it is ever used commercially. 

I suspect that the produce bags are simply polyethylene, and apparently at least some of them are HDPE:

https://www.uline.com/Product/Detail/S-19156/Food-Bags/Narrow-Profile-Produce-Bags-14-x-18?pricode=WA9598&gadtype=pla&id=S-19156&gclid=CjwKCAiAoOz-BRBdEiwAyuvA65b0LsvFjvsbjLxyNGJWd5zxubTN3r6DGYSw-BN6WNVfl0hhzJDg7hoC0zsQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

I can't find anything to suggest they contain any kind of additive.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Andy Miller
 

Gary,

 

I’ve been using those bags for years to pack my trains when I move them.

 

Regards and Happy holidays,

 

Andy Miller

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gary Roe
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 10:20 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

Admittedly, this post is not about Steam Era Freight Car models; but the transportation and/or storage of same.

 

I do not have a layout, so virtually all of my models 'live' in a box.....usually the one they came in.  Once they are built, painted, and weathered, in my mind it is not preferable to stick them back in a box unprotected.  I recently 'discovered' something that I think is the answer; but knowing my luck, it will probably be detrimental to the model and/or its finish.  That's why I seek the advice of someone who knows.

 

The material I was thinking of using is a very thin, very soft, pliable plastic.  The source is my grocery store.  It is the bags they have in dispensers in the fruits and vegetables section.  I can find nothing that tells what kind of plastic it is, only that it is classified as a No. 2 Recyclable, and made by Unistar Plastics.

 

Will this stuff end up adhering itself to my models, or perform some other regrettable act of violence toward them?

 

Thanks in advance for tolerance of this subject, and any insight.

 

gary roe

quincy, illinois


Charlie Duckworth
 

Gary
While this response isn’t about resin or plastic models being stored it did caution me on using plastic directly against a model.  I was reading that a Lionel collector had wrapped his prewar cars in plastic when he stored them.  After he passed away the family decided to sell the collection and when the models were unwrapped the plastic had reacted to the paint and when the plastic wrapping was removed some of the paint had stuck to it and pulled the paint off.  For my models that are built and don’t have a factory made storage (like Tangent or Exactrail) I first wrap the model in tissue paper (the type people use for presents) and then wrap in a layer of the smallest bubble wrap as to protect the parts.  

Charlie 

On Dec 17, 2020, at 9:21 AM, Gary Roe <wabashrr@...> wrote:


Admittedly, this post is not about Steam Era Freight Car models; but the transportation and/or storage of same.

I do not have a layout, so virtually all of my models 'live' in a box.....usually the one they came in.  Once they are built, painted, and weathered, in my mind it is not preferable to stick them back in a box unprotected.  I recently 'discovered' something that I think is the answer; but knowing my luck, it will probably be detrimental to the model and/or its finish.  That's why I seek the advice of someone who knows.

The material I was thinking of using is a very thin, very soft, pliable plastic.  The source is my grocery store.  It is the bags they have in dispensers in the fruits and vegetables section.  I can find nothing that tells what kind of plastic it is, only that it is classified as a No. 2 Recyclable, and made by Unistar Plastics.

Will this stuff end up adhering itself to my models, or perform some other regrettable act of violence toward them?

Thanks in advance for tolerance of this subject, and any insight.

gary roe
quincy, illinois

--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

If you want to be completely sure, wrap your steam era freight car models in archival use acid free paper. 

Regards,
Bruce SMith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 11:09 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT
 
Gary
While this response isn’t about resin or plastic models being stored it did caution me on using plastic directly against a model.  I was reading that a Lionel collector had wrapped his prewar cars in plastic when he stored them.  After he passed away the family decided to sell the collection and when the models were unwrapped the plastic had reacted to the paint and when the plastic wrapping was removed some of the paint had stuck to it and pulled the paint off.  For my models that are built and don’t have a factory made storage (like Tangent or Exactrail) I first wrap the model in tissue paper (the type people use for presents) and then wrap in a layer of the smallest bubble wrap as to protect the parts.  

Charlie 


Douglas Harding
 

Gary, with my moving, packing HO rolling stock has been a concern. Damage was occurring until I began using these products.

To protect each car I do use pieces of this foam, with additional pieces to line the boxes https://www.uline.com/Product/Detail/S-787P/Foam/Foam-Roll-Perforated-1-16-24-x-1250

I use these boxes https://www.uline.com/Product/Detail/S-3189/Indestructo-and-Literature-Mailers/23-x-13-x-2-1-2-White-Literature-Mailers

The boxes are perfect for rows of HO cars or engines.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gary Roe
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 9:20 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

Admittedly, this post is not about Steam Era Freight Car models; but the transportation and/or storage of same.

 

I do not have a layout, so virtually all of my models 'live' in a box.....usually the one they came in.  Once they are built, painted, and weathered, in my mind it is not preferable to stick them back in a box unprotected.  I recently 'discovered' something that I think is the answer; but knowing my luck, it will probably be detrimental to the model and/or its finish.  That's why I seek the advice of someone who knows.

 

The material I was thinking of using is a very thin, very soft, pliable plastic.  The source is my grocery store.  It is the bags they have in dispensers in the fruits and vegetables section.  I can find nothing that tells what kind of plastic it is, only that it is classified as a No. 2 Recyclable, and made by Unistar Plastics.

 

Will this stuff end up adhering itself to my models, or perform some other regrettable act of violence toward them?

 

Thanks in advance for tolerance of this subject, and any insight.

 

gary roe

quincy, illinois


Schuyler Larrabee
 

When REBOXX was selling boxes, they had researched “the best” plastic wrappers for models, in part because one of the workers had had very unfortunate experienced with wrapping models he’d custom painted and his customers finding . . . problems.  Unfortunately, none of the surviving personnel remember what it was.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 12:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

Gary, with my moving, packing HO rolling stock has been a concern. Damage was occurring until I began using these products.

To protect each car I do use pieces of this foam, with additional pieces to line the boxes https://www.uline.com/Product/Detail/S-787P/Foam/Foam-Roll-Perforated-1-16-24-x-1250

I use these boxes https://www.uline.com/Product/Detail/S-3189/Indestructo-and-Literature-Mailers/23-x-13-x-2-1-2-White-Literature-Mailers

The boxes are perfect for rows of HO cars or engines.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gary Roe
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 9:20 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

Admittedly, this post is not about Steam Era Freight Car models; but the transportation and/or storage of same.

 

I do not have a layout, so virtually all of my models 'live' in a box.....usually the one they came in.  Once they are built, painted, and weathered, in my mind it is not preferable to stick them back in a box unprotected.  I recently 'discovered' something that I think is the answer; but knowing my luck, it will probably be detrimental to the model and/or its finish.  That's why I seek the advice of someone who knows.

 

The material I was thinking of using is a very thin, very soft, pliable plastic.  The source is my grocery store.  It is the bags they have in dispensers in the fruits and vegetables section.  I can find nothing that tells what kind of plastic it is, only that it is classified as a No. 2 Recyclable, and made by Unistar Plastics.

 

Will this stuff end up adhering itself to my models, or perform some other regrettable act of violence toward them?

 

Thanks in advance for tolerance of this subject, and any insight.

 

gary roe

quincy, illinois


Tony Thompson
 

    Gary, I can't answer your question about the produce bags, but what I have found to be very dependable over years of use is ordinary sandwich bags (the kind where you tuck in the flap to close). These protect a model from abrasion on protruding parts like grab irons, and do not seem to interact with the model surface. 

     An HO scale car of 40-ft. or less fits nicely. Of course it takes two of them for 50-ft. cars . . .

Tony Thompson




Andy Brusgard <ajb1102@...>
 

After having the original packing foam destroy the custom paint jobs I did on at least six brass locos, I now wrap in paper towels than wrap in inexpensive 11" x 12" plastic storage bags. Than if older foam. I'll toss the fome and wrap with bubble wrap - small bubbles. You can get different size bubbles.  


frograbbit602
 

Gary I am not not a chemist or sure about the various plastics; however, I did use bubble wrap as shown in the one box. I read an article on car damage using the bubble wrap so going back to my old system of cardboard. (Photos) I have also started putting a piece of cardboard between trucks and foam not shown in the photos. I also have purchased cars wrapped in tissue paper that is turning yellow; however, no harm to the plastic. I store resin built freight cars in Athearn boxes due to size as I purchased several hundred years back.

Lester Breuer


Ken Vandevoort <apo09324@...>
 

I haven't tried produce bags, but I did learn the hard way that rubber shelf liners will take the paint off of cars.

Ken Vandevoort


Aley, Jeff A
 

I was cautioned by the late Dr. Denny Anspach to wrap models in FOOD GRADE polyethyline sheets or bags.  Since the Reboxx are no longer available, he recommended buying them from Dan’s Trains in Ocala, FL.  [I note that they are out of stock at the moment].  Why “Food Grade”?  Because the mold releases that MAY be used on non-food grade bags could interact w/ our models.  Rumor has it that this is the problem with some bubble-wraps.  Food grade bags are not permitted to have such mold releases.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 11:07 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

When REBOXX was selling boxes, they had researched “the best” plastic wrappers for models, in part because one of the workers had had very unfortunate experienced with wrapping models he’d custom painted and his customers finding . . . problems.  Unfortunately, none of the surviving personnel remember what it was.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 12:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

Gary, with my moving, packing HO rolling stock has been a concern. Damage was occurring until I began using these products.

To protect each car I do use pieces of this foam, with additional pieces to line the boxes https://www.uline.com/Product/Detail/S-787P/Foam/Foam-Roll-Perforated-1-16-24-x-1250

I use these boxes https://www.uline.com/Product/Detail/S-3189/Indestructo-and-Literature-Mailers/23-x-13-x-2-1-2-White-Literature-Mailers

The boxes are perfect for rows of HO cars or engines.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gary Roe
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 9:20 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

Admittedly, this post is not about Steam Era Freight Car models; but the transportation and/or storage of same.

 

I do not have a layout, so virtually all of my models 'live' in a box.....usually the one they came in.  Once they are built, painted, and weathered, in my mind it is not preferable to stick them back in a box unprotected.  I recently 'discovered' something that I think is the answer; but knowing my luck, it will probably be detrimental to the model and/or its finish.  That's why I seek the advice of someone who knows.

 

The material I was thinking of using is a very thin, very soft, pliable plastic.  The source is my grocery store.  It is the bags they have in dispensers in the fruits and vegetables section.  I can find nothing that tells what kind of plastic it is, only that it is classified as a No. 2 Recyclable, and made by Unistar Plastics.

 

Will this stuff end up adhering itself to my models, or perform some other regrettable act of violence toward them?

 

Thanks in advance for tolerance of this subject, and any insight.

 

gary roe

quincy, illinois


Schuyler Larrabee
 

A ZipLok Storage (quart size) bag can ALMOST close on a 50’ car.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 2:36 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

    Gary, I can't answer your question about the produce bags, but what I have found to be very dependable over years of use is ordinary sandwich bags (the kind where you tuck in the flap to close). These protect a model from abrasion on protruding parts like grab irons, and do not seem to interact with the model surface. 

 

     An HO scale car of 40-ft. or less fits nicely. Of course it takes two of them for 50-ft. cars . . .

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


Tony Thompson
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

A ZipLok Storage (quart size) bag can ALMOST close on a 50’ car.

      I did try ZipLok bags at one point. Fighting to avoid scraping with the closure while inserting the car, and my reluctance to tightly seal the model inside, led to  my discarding approach.

Tony Thompson




Mont Switzer
 

Jeff and all,

 

Without Doc Denny who is going to come up with all of this information?

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Aley, Jeff A
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 5:42 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

I was cautioned by the late Dr. Denny Anspach to wrap models in FOOD GRADE polyethyline sheets or bags.  Since the Reboxx are no longer available, he recommended buying them from Dan’s Trains in Ocala, FL.  [I note that they are out of stock at the moment].  Why “Food Grade”?  Because the mold releases that MAY be used on non-food grade bags could interact w/ our models.  Rumor has it that this is the problem with some bubble-wraps.  Food grade bags are not permitted to have such mold releases.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 11:07 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

When REBOXX was selling boxes, they had researched “the best” plastic wrappers for models, in part because one of the workers had had very unfortunate experienced with wrapping models he’d custom painted and his customers finding . . . problems.  Unfortunately, none of the surviving personnel remember what it was.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 12:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

Gary, with my moving, packing HO rolling stock has been a concern. Damage was occurring until I began using these products.

To protect each car I do use pieces of this foam, with additional pieces to line the boxes https://www.uline.com/Product/Detail/S-787P/Foam/Foam-Roll-Perforated-1-16-24-x-1250

I use these boxes https://www.uline.com/Product/Detail/S-3189/Indestructo-and-Literature-Mailers/23-x-13-x-2-1-2-White-Literature-Mailers

The boxes are perfect for rows of HO cars or engines.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gary Roe
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 9:20 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

Admittedly, this post is not about Steam Era Freight Car models; but the transportation and/or storage of same.

 

I do not have a layout, so virtually all of my models 'live' in a box.....usually the one they came in.  Once they are built, painted, and weathered, in my mind it is not preferable to stick them back in a box unprotected.  I recently 'discovered' something that I think is the answer; but knowing my luck, it will probably be detrimental to the model and/or its finish.  That's why I seek the advice of someone who knows.

 

The material I was thinking of using is a very thin, very soft, pliable plastic.  The source is my grocery store.  It is the bags they have in dispensers in the fruits and vegetables section.  I can find nothing that tells what kind of plastic it is, only that it is classified as a No. 2 Recyclable, and made by Unistar Plastics.

 

Will this stuff end up adhering itself to my models, or perform some other regrettable act of violence toward them?

 

Thanks in advance for tolerance of this subject, and any insight.

 

gary roe

quincy, illinois


Jim Betz
 

Tony/all,
  I use Ziploc brand because I like the weight of the plastic (and it is
food grade).   I don't like the lighter weight stuff because it can
'grab' the fine details.

  But - I cut the bag open on 3 sides and toss the closure and 
side edges - and then simply roll the model in the 'sheet' of plastic. 
Works for me.
                                                                                                  - Jim


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Jim Betz writes:

“then simply roll the model in the 'sheet' of plastic”

 

I’ve seen many modelers wrap models along one of axis, or centerline, of the sheet, then have trouble stuffing it into the foam in the box (if that’s what we’re doing).  For years, I bought a sub sandwich for lunch daily, and noted how they wrapped the sandwich in paper.  They placed the sandwich diagonally on the square of paper and as they rolled it up, they folded in the corners on either side, making a nice tight roll of it all.

 

Works very well when wrapping models in plastic, too . . .

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Betz
Sent: Friday, December 18, 2020 10:41 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calling All Chemists - Somewhat OT

 

Tony/all,
  I use Ziploc brand because I like the weight of the plastic (and it is
food grade).   I don't like the lighter weight stuff because it can
'grab' the fine details.

  But - I cut the bag open on 3 sides and toss the closure and 
side edges - and then simply roll the model in the 'sheet' of plastic. 
Works for me.
                                                                                                  - Jim