Car Float Accident With Santa Fe Reefers


Bob Chaparro
 

Car Float Accident With Santa Fe Reefers

“O hear us when we cry to Thee

For those in Peril on the sea”

Photo courtesy of Kevin Caoimhín Bunker on the Facebook Santa Fe Railway Historical & Modeling Society group.

Probably of interest to this group are the views of the undersides of the reefers (see link below).

 

He states:

“Some days it doesn't pay to get out of bed.  Example:  this day, in 1937, when the crew of a Red Stack Tug was ferrying a railroad car-float across San Francisco Bay from Point Richmond to San Francisco and Pier 43, the car-float loaded with Santa Fe Railway refrigerator cars bringing chilled foods into city wholesalers.  What the crew didn't know was that super gale was rapidly forming in the North Pacific and galloping inland.  Ships out at sea were getting hit hard by extremely high winds and high breaking waves.

In hardly any time at all, around mid-afternoon, the gale swept past the Golden Gate and rocked across the bay, catching the unsuspecting tug and its cargo cross-wise. With a giant heavy burst of energy, the car-float got caught in a sharp swell and with the powerful gusts of wind three of the "reefers" derailed, one nearly rolling over sideways, it stopped from going completely on its side by its nearest neighbor reefer, which also tried to flip over.  Then the winds subsided as they rushed further inland.  The tug crew inhaled and considered their options, which were basically this: go dead slow ahead and make port and, with luck, they'd make it without further damage.

On arrival, San Francisco port authorities met the tug crew, as did the railroad's freight claim agents and together they tried to figure out what to do next.  Right behind them came a San Francisco Examiner news photographer, anxious to get some sensational record shots as a scoop for that evening's street edition.  He got several great shots, but this was probably the best of the lot.

The sudden storm was a whopper and hit much of the state that afternoon and well into evening as it worked east and south.

U.C., Berkeley - Bancroft Library, San Francisco Examiner Collection via Calisphere.”

For other photos of this accident, go to this link:

https://calisphere.org/item/b5ff0c4259fa1eabcffbd3775384ab4a/

The click on “View source image on contributor's website.”

Each of the five photos and the description card can be enlarged.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


Ken Adams
 

A very interesting series of photos.  Much later in the 1980's I worked for Crowley Maritime who still owned Red Stack Tugboats before selling it to Fosse. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Tom Madden
 

The car number of the reefer with the yellow end appears to be 37125. That would make it an almost brand-new Santa Fe Rr-22, a 50' car, one of 200 delivered in the summer of 1937 according to the SFMO/SFRH&MS refrigerator car book. 

Tom Madden


spsalso
 

Judging by the position of Alcatraz and Angel Island, it looks like the car float is tied up at Pier 45, immediately west of Pier 43, a car ferry slip.  If docked at the slip, it would be connect to the SF Belt Railway.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Tony Thompson
 

Then the State Belt, not SFBelt.
Tony Thompson 


On May 28, 2022, at 12:35 PM, spsalso via groups.io <Edwardsutorik@...> wrote:

Judging by the position of Alcatraz and Angel Island, it looks like the car float is tied up at Pier 45, immediately west of Pier 43, a car ferry slip.  If docked at the slip, it would be connect to the SF Belt Railway.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Nolan Hinshaw
 

On May 28, 2022, at 13:38, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Then the State Belt, not SFBelt.
See Bill Kaufman's book on the subject, from Signature Press. My copy is duly autographed.
--
Willie saw some dynamite
Couldn't understand it quite
Curiosity never pays;
It rained Willie seven days.