Topics

Crappy Job

Matt Smith
 

From the Illinois Digital Archives - Pantagraph (Bloomington IL local paper) Collection.

Frisco gondola with manure being unloaded from Chicago 3/24/44.

This is a C&A siding near the Funk Bros Seed company on Bloomingtons west side. Download Available via link.

http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/34018/rec/310
--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Gary Roe
 

The gondola must have been loaded on that siding behind city hall.

gary roe
quincy, illinois



On Thursday, September 5, 2019, 12:20:16 PM CDT, Matt Smith <flyn96@...> wrote:


From the Illinois Digital Archives - Pantagraph (Bloomington IL local paper) Collection.

Frisco gondola with manure being unloaded from Chicago 3/24/44.

This is a C&A siding near the Funk Bros Seed company on Bloomingtons west side. Download Available via link.

http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/34018/rec/310
--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Sep 5, 2019, at 11:21, Gary Roe <wabashrr@...> wrote:

The gondola must have been loaded on that siding behind city hall.
Crappy job, indeed, especially if the loading or unloading happened with human muscle power.

My late Dad worked at the Woodland, Yolo County, CA Spreckels plant up though the early 1950s and I can remember the pong of the beet pulp loads which went to a nearby feed lot where steersch[0] took the place of the pulp and then went to fields as icipient fertilizer.

[0] Dad’s term of endearment for the schtuff

^<@<.@*
}"_# |
-@$&/_%
!( @|=>
;`+$?^?
,#"~|)^G

Jim Gates
 


What did you do in the Great World War Two?

One extra point if you recognize the movie.

Jim Gates

On Thursday, September 5, 2019, 12:20:15 PM CDT, Matt Smith <flyn96@...> wrote:


From the Illinois Digital Archives - Pantagraph (Bloomington IL local paper) Collection.

Frisco gondola with manure being unloaded from Chicago 3/24/44.

This is a C&A siding near the Funk Bros Seed company on Bloomingtons west side. Download Available via link.

http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/34018/rec/310
--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

“Well, I shoveled s417 in Louisiana” 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Sep 5, 2019, at 3:41 PM, Jim Gates via Groups.Io <jim.gates@...> wrote:


What did you do in the Great World War Two?

One extra point if you recognize the movie.

Jim Gates
On Thursday, September 5, 2019, 12:20:15 PM CDT, Matt Smith <flyn96@...> wrote:


From the Illinois Digital Archives - Pantagraph (Bloomington IL local paper) Collection.

Frisco gondola with manure being unloaded from Chicago 3/24/44.

This is a C&A siding near the Funk Bros Seed company on Bloomingtons west side. Download Available via link.

http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/34018/rec/310
--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Eric Hansmann
 

Well, it’s got to go somewhere, right? That looks like an all day job.

 

I see steam coming off of the loads in the wagon and the trucks. It’s probably keeping the workers warm on a chilly day. Doing this on a hot August day would be at the bottom of a task list.

 

Check out the little boys on the tractor.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Matt Smith
Sent: Thursday, September 5, 2019 12:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Crappy Job

 

From the Illinois Digital Archives - Pantagraph (Bloomington IL local paper) Collection.

Frisco gondola with manure being unloaded from Chicago 3/24/44.

This is a C&A siding near the Funk Bros Seed company on Bloomingtons west side. Download Available via link.

http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll35/id/34018/rec/310
--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Andy Laurent
 

They are UNloading this car, by hand into the wagon and truck in the background...  The caption information notes it is a car from Chicago.  I have records of 6 gondolas of manure shipped from Union Stock Yards in Chicago to a fruit orchard near Sturgeon Bay, WI in the late 40s.  The cars were unloaded in late spring on an industry lead in downtown Sturgeon Bay on 1st Ave...and employees of the time noted that the smell was horrendous, even after the cars were unloaded.  It was a one-time shipment, similar to a two-car shipment of horses in stock cars in 1949...all were so badly injured that they had to be put down.

Yummy.

Andy L.
Wisconsin

 

Why would anyone want to ship a load of manure? ... or ... receive?... no political comment.

Gordon Spalty... city boy...:)

Charles Peck
 

The why?  Those stockyards had to get rid of it somehow and it was cheap fertilizer on the farm.
Chuck Peck

On Thu, Sep 5, 2019 at 9:55 PM Doc Bond <boomer1944@...> wrote:
Why would anyone want to ship a load of manure? ... or ... receive?... no political comment.

Gordon Spalty... city boy...:)

Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, Sep 5, 2019 at 06:55 PM, Doc Bond wrote:
Why would anyone want to ship a load of manure?
Hey, for a while in the seventies or eighties the City of Chicago was shipping dried sewage treatment plant solids downstate for use as fertilizer... until it was discovered that the solids were rich in heavy metals, which were being taken up by the crops and entering our food chain. I recall the movement on the Illinois Central was known informally as the "ICBM".

Dennis Storzek

Patrick Wade
 

Perhaps needed by a seed company to feed seed corn plants or to throw down by a landscaper before planting a new lawn. As a kid in Cleveland in the 1950s I remember living in a new apartment development and all the bare lawns were given a cover of horse manure.

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Thu, Sep 5, 2019 at 6:55 PM Doc Bond <boomer1944@...> wrote:
Why would anyone want to ship a load of manure? ... or ... receive?... no political comment.

Gordon Spalty... city boy...:)

passcars
 

I feel sorry for the gondola, "was" a nice car.  And the poor guys having to shovel the stuff out.  It's ripe and still cookin'.
Steve Peery

Alex Huff
 

Look up Milorganite.  It is a processed product of the City of Milwaukee's sewage treatment system.  Sold since 1925.  Popular use is as a bagged fertilizer for lawns and golf courses.  Michigan Northern Railway delivered one MILW 40' boxcar a year to Rockford, MI's golf course.  It was a team track delivery.  No odor.  Empty car was then switched to the loading dock of Wolverine World Wide's leather tanning factory in Rockford.  Loaded with scrap leather trimmings, the car was interchanged to the C&O at Reed City, MI for a carferry move from Ludington, MI to Milwaukee.
Alex Huff

Douglas Harding
 

Manure was a commodity that could be sold. The most common use was as fertilizer. You can buy bags of it today at home centers. Every stockyard, sale barn, feed lot, and slaughter house had to have a plan for dealing with the manure that accumulated from handling livestock. Large stockyards had carts or wagons with work crews who picked it up every day. If not sold locally it was loaded into gons and shipped somewhere. Sometimes it was placed in large bags for shipment. Thus railroads handled gons and boxcars loaded with the stuff. Farmers and gardeners put it on their fields and gardens. Horse manure is favored because of the large amount of straw and hay often mixed in with the manure.

 

I have additional photos of manure and freight cars.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

Doug Polinder
 

Alex, thanks for this amazing anecdote.  I rode a Michigan Northern excursion in 1983 from Rockford to Cedar Springs.  Also rode the C&O car ferry to Kewaunee (or maybe Manitowoc? don't remember) in 1984.  What do you suppose the destination of the scrap leather was in Milwaukee?  Did the load also come via the C&O car ferry and interchange at Reed City?  Another potential routing was the Grand Trunk car ferry and then interchange at Grand Rapids to the MIGN.

The Michigan rail network has been pretty well decimated since that time.  The tracks from Grand Rapids through Rockford to Cadillac (ex GR&I, ex-PRR, ex-PC, ex-CR [?], ex-MIGN) have been gone since the mid-1980s, as have the line to Ludington, the car-ferry service, and much other C&O (ex-PM) trackage, as well as most of the Ann Arbor, etc., etc.

Doug Polinder
Poquoson VA

James SANDIFER
 

Santa Fe had a contract with a Manure Pulverizing company to process the waste from it big Morris Feed Lot. Ultimately it became fertilizer. The same was true for dirty stock car bedding.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Thursday, September 5, 2019 9:45 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Crappy Job

 

On Thu, Sep 5, 2019 at 06:55 PM, Doc Bond wrote:

Why would anyone want to ship a load of manure?

Hey, for a while in the seventies or eighties the City of Chicago was shipping dried sewage treatment plant solids downstate for use as fertilizer... until it was discovered that the solids were rich in heavy metals, which were being taken up by the crops and entering our food chain. I recall the movement on the Illinois Central was known informally as the "ICBM".

Dennis Storzek