Decaling Kadee cars.


Brian Carlson
 

I have some undecorated Kadee hoppers to decal. They are nice glossy black directly from Kadee. Has anybody detailed directly onto a Kadee car or do you coat it with future first for a gloss surface ? It looks glossy enough as it is but I’m curious what others may have done.

Brian J. Carlson


--
Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


John Sykes III
 

I think Kadee cars are ABS plastic.  Decals don't stick to them very well.  Would use some sort of gloss coat.

-- John


John Sykes III
 

Also, I was thinking (dangerous!).  Decal setting solutions work by softening (partially dissolving) the decal film AND the underlying paint, fusing them together.  Without something to bond to you'll get silvering at best and unbonded and very visible edges, etc, at worst.


Tim O'Connor
 

I think many people apply primer to models before applying Archer rivets, for the same reason.

On 9/19/2021 10:33 AM, John Sykes III via groups.io wrote:
Also, I was thinking (dangerous!).  Decal setting solutions work by softening (partially dissolving) the decal film AND the underlying paint, fusing them together.  Without something to bond to you'll get silvering at best and unbonded and very visible edges, etc, at worst.
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


hubert mask
 

I suggest you paint the cars.  Then apply the gloss coat. 

Hubert Mask
Mask Island Decals Inc.


On Sep 19, 2021, at 10:24 AM, John Sykes III via groups.io <johnsykesiii@...> wrote:

I think Kadee cars are ABS plastic.  Decals don't stick to them very well.  Would use some sort of gloss coat.

-- John


Jim Betz
 

Hi,
  My experience is exactly the opposite.  I have a method that allows me to
apply any decal (from any source) to any paint (gloss, dull, etc.) and to 
always end up with "perfect results".  
  Many of you are going to say "Well, not me!" and I suggest to you that you
try my method before you cast stones at it.  It goes like this:

  1) I clean the surface (to remove dust) with water and a very small amount
      of dish detergent.
  2) I rinse off the surface, first under the tap and then using a final small
      amount of distilled water (just enough to get any mineral content from
      the tap water off).
  3) Cut and place the decal in distilled water and wait for it to slide free of
      the backing.  And transfer it to the desired location - "as close as possible".
      I pick the decal out of the distilled water using the tip of a hobby knife.
  4) Now, using the tip of a hobby knife, I get the decal precisely where I want
      it.  Remember that it is "floating in some distilled water".  I usually place
      the tip of the blade 'outside' of the decal and then push the decal where I
      want it.
  5) I let it dry until you can't see any wetness to the surface ("about 15").
       If, rarely, there are some errors in positioning or a fold/large "bump" 
       then go back to step 4.
  6) I float Solvaset on top of the decal - and draw off all the excess using
      very small rectangles of tissue paper, held in tweezers, and only to the
      edges of the Solvaset puddle (not on/over the decal).  Yes, I use the
      supplied brush in the Solvaset bottle - but it -never- touches the decal
      (or the surface).
  7) Let it dry until you can't see any wetness.  However long it takes.
  8) Redo steps 6 and 7 one more time.
  9) Take a round pin (the kind with a plastic ball on one end that my wife uses
       for sewing) and using -vertical- taps I pierce the decal "everywhere" and
       especially where there are any bubbles (silvering).
 10) Redo steps 6 and 7.
 11) Repeat step 10 "as many times as it takes for all of the silvering to be gone".
 12) When fully dry - "wash" with a small amount of distilled water.  I often apply
       using a soft paint brush.  The idea is to get the 'whitish stains' from the
       Solvaset off of the model.
  13) Finally - overspray with some form of dull coating.  I have even applied
        this using a soft brush.

  Important hint - have the heel of your hand resting on something for all the
times you take anything to the model (water, decal, solvent, rinse, etc.).  This
allows you to control the movement of your fingers very precisely.

  I reuse the tissue rectangles during the same decal session.

  I work on 3 or 4 models at a time.  While one is drying I work on one of the
others.  I have done as many as 6 or 7 at one sitting but never more.  If I only
have one model to do - I do something else during its drying time - such as
reading emails or whatever.
  Yes, this method works even when the decal has to cross over irregularities
in the surface of the model (such as a 'ditch' for a board line).
                                                                                                             - Jim


Jim Betz
 

  ... change step 4 to include "wicking the water" before letting it dry (using the
rectangles of tissue and tweezers).


SamClarke
 

Hello Brian and group,

 

Kadee cars have stryene bodies and Delrin parts, the bodies have a thin layer of water base paint and the parts are unpainted.

 

 

 

 

Sam Clarke

R&D / Tech Advisor / Artist

Kadee Quality Products Co.

mail@...

541-826-3883

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


John Sykes III
 

I stand corrected.  In this case you can decal right onto them.

-- John


Todd Sullivan
 

Sam,

Great piece of information.  Thank you!

Tod Sullivan



On Monday, September 20, 2021, 10:32:18 AM CDT, SamClarke via groups.io <samc@...> wrote:


Hello Brian and group,

 

Kadee cars have stryene bodies and Delrin parts, the bodies have a thin layer of water base paint and the parts are unpainted.

 

 

 

 

Sam Clarke

R&D / Tech Advisor / Artist

Kadee Quality Products Co.

mail@...

541-826-3883

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bruce Hendrick
 

I’ve tried decaling directly onto unpainted plastic several times but found that over time the decal would begin to peal. I suggest painting the car.

Bruce Hendrick
Brea, California