Topics

Digest Number 109


Earl Tuson
 

-Jeff (the youngest dinosaur [age 30])
2nd, Jeff; I'm 28. (The standard joke when I was in Houston with the local S
scale group was that I cut the average age by half. I think the next youngest
was about my father's age.)

I'm not sure - all you young punks look more or less alike to me - except
that Earl has fuzz on his face and you and Ben don't.
Geez, I shaved today. I promise to let it grow before the next RPM meet.
Never got into punk, though.

In your dreams, Aley. You'll still be lusting after my photo collection
when you're in your sixties and I'm over a hundred.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Unfortunately, every so often I hear about some elderly person that died that
might have had some anecdote about the Sun Val to tell me. I see steam era
history itself disappearing, and honestly hope that folks like yourself plan
carefully for your collections' destination after you pass away as well. Last
fall, noted B&M historian Harry Frye passed away (early 60's by the way)-
without a will. His collection will be piecemealed at an auction in a few
weeks. How much will survive to the next generation? All of would have if he
had planned.

Earl Tuson


__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail.
http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/


ted_culotta@...
 

--- In STMFC@y..., Earl Tuson <etuson@y...> wrote:
Last
fall, noted B&M historian Harry Frye passed away (early 60's by the
way)-
without a will. His collection will be piecemealed at an auction
in a few
weeks. How much will survive to the next generation? All of would
have if he
had planned.
Earl:

Do you have any details about the auction of the Frye Collection?

The same thing happened with noted Wabash historian and collector Dr.
George Drake, Jr. Unfortunately, as far as I know, there has been no
disposition of his collection and his wife looked upon the whole
train thing as a very bad distraction.

Regards,
Ted


Richard Hendrickson
 

Earl (the kid) Tusan wrote:

Unfortunately, every so often I hear about some elderly person that died that
might have had some anecdote about the Sun Val to tell me. I see steam era
history itself disappearing, and honestly hope that folks like yourself plan
carefully for your collections' destination after you pass away as well. Last
fall, noted B&M historian Harry Frye passed away (early 60's by the way)-
without a will. His collection will be piecemealed at an auction in a few
weeks. How much will survive to the next generation? All of would have if he
had planned.
A point well made. In my case, my wife (who is considerably younger than I
am) supports my railroad interests, understands the value of my collection,
and knows who to turn to for advice and assistance in disposing of it. But
that's certainly the exception rather than the rule.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Richard Hendrickson
 

Ted Culotta wrote:

The same thing happened with noted Wabash historian and collector Dr.
George Drake, Jr. Unfortunately, as far as I know, there has been no
disposition of his collection and his wife looked upon the whole
train thing as a very bad distraction.
It's my understanding that George's collection HAS been disposed of. His
wife trashed the whole works, and apparently derived considerable
satisfaction from doing so. Retribution from beyond the grave, etc.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

Richard (the Lionhearted) Hendrickson wrote

In my case, my wife (who is considerably younger than I am) ....
Ah-hah! I'm starting to understand that "X rated" comment you made.

Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@mediaone.net>
Marlborough, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

It's my understanding that George's collection HAS been disposed of.
His wife trashed the whole works, and apparently derived considerable
satisfaction from doing so. Retribution from beyond the grave, etc.
That makes me ill thinking about it. I -think- my wife appreciates
the value of my toys, but I guess I'd better write down instructions
and have them attached to the will. Oh wait, I'll have to get a will
first!

Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@mediaone.net>
Marlborough, Massachusetts


Guy Wilber
 

In a message dated 4/5/01 9:44:10 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
rhendrickson@opendoor.com writes:

<< His
wife trashed the whole works, and apparently derived considerable
satisfaction from doing so. >>

If so, he's probably better off.

Guy


Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

<< His
wife trashed the whole works, and apparently derived considerable
satisfaction from doing so. >>

If so, he's probably better off.

Guy

One never knows. Consider this fictional scenario: he refused his wife the
funds to attend a family funeral and turned around and bought some brass
with the savings. Or something like that. Just because the deceased shared
our interests doesn't make him a saint.

Dave Nelson


tgmadden <tgmadden@...>
 

Richard & Tim exchangeth:

It's my understanding that George's collection HAS been disposed of.
His wife trashed the whole works, and apparently derived considerable
satisfaction from doing so. Retribution from beyond the grave, etc.
That makes me ill thinking about it. I -think- my wife appreciates
the value of my toys, but I guess I'd better write down instructions
and have them attached to the will. Oh wait, I'll have to get a will
first!

Reference British 19th century explorer, linguist, scholar, soldier,
anthropologist, and translator Sir Richard Francis Burton (1821 - 1890),
whose interest in and translations of mid-eastern erotica so offended his
puritanical wife that she burned all of his manuscripts and journals almost
immediately upon his death.

It's not the "toys" we should worry about, but the information sources.
Anyone who keeps at it long enough will accumulate a considerable body of
reference material. The true value may well be in its totality and coherence
rather than what the individual components will fetch. But if our heirs
don't understand and appreciate this, they may break it up in order to get
the maximum bucks for the estate. Or destroy it, if there's resentment
toward our interest (as Dave points out), or if we foster a patronizing
attitude like "Gramps sure keeps busy playing with his trains".

Tom


Jeff Aley - GCD PE <jaley@...>
 

On Apr 6, 9:19am, Dave & Libby Nelson wrote:
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Digest Number 109
One never knows. Consider this fictional scenario: he refused his wife
the
funds to attend a family funeral and turned around and bought some brass
with the savings. Or something like that.
Which reminds me of one of my favorite stories, told to me by a UPHS
member who lives in New Mexico (and whose name escapes me):

He and his wife were discussing "final plans". He told her that when the
time came, he would like to be cremated. Because of his love of trains,
he told her, he would appreciate it if she would display his ashes not in
an urn, but in the tender of a brass UP Big Boy.

She, teary eyed, solemnly agreed. Her tears turned to anger, however,
when he went on to suggest that he might as well buy the brass Big Boy
NOW, and use it on his layout, so that she wouldn't have to go purchase
one when he died.

IIRC, the fellow is now divorced.

Regards,

-Jeff

P.S. It would not surprise me if UPHS members in Florida used the same
tactics...

--
Jeff Aley, Development Engineer jaley@pcocd2.intel.com
Graphics Components Division
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533


tgmadden <tgmadden@...>
 

Jeff Aley,after describing a Big Boy purchase scam:
P.S. It would not surprise me if UPHS members in Florida used the same
tactics...

UPHS members in Florida have other worries, including trying to figure out
what "Hill" means.

[Hint to Mike: Sherman Hill was not the surveyor's name.]

Tom