Topics

Heinz plant locations


Ray Breyer
 

In case any of you need a ketchup or pickle fix on your layout, and are itching to run a vat or vinegar car or two, information can be scarce on the ground regarding just where these industries were located.

So here's a 1910 Heinz map showing plant locations:
https://archive.org/details/hjheinzcompanypr00hjhe

And here's a 1946 map:

Quick stats: in 1910, Heinz had 13 packing plants, 6 vinegar plants, 67 salting stations, and 40 branch warehouses. In 1946, they had 15 packing plants, 112 salting stations, 77 fresh produce receiving stations, and 71 branch warehouses.

Keep in mind that this is less than a third of the industry represented. 


And in case anyone care, here's most of the Heinz annual reports from 1946-2010.
https://archive.org/details/hjheinzcompanyannualreports

And a nifty old Heinz informational film.
https://archive.org/details/1092BigDeliveryWagonThe

Now go out and buy Westerfield and Sunshine pickle industry cars!


Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


David Soderblom
 

I note with interest the three factories in northern California, Salinas, ~Oakland, and Tracy/Los Banos.  Yet Calif. is not a producer of the materials (take a look at all those cukes from Michigan!), implying a lot of shipment of the materials from elsewhere.  Yet I don’t recall ever seeing a Heinz car in a Calif. photo, let alone many.

David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA







mel perry
 

while on the suject of heinz, there used
to be a site dedicated to the heinz
freightcars (long since disappreared),
question i have is, after the 34' boxcars,
were there 36' cars, the reason for the
question is that the 36' cars have been
referenced by kit makers & decal
producers, but i have not found any
documentation to support this contention, if anyone can provide a
source, it would be greatly appreciated,
fyi the various decal/dry transfer
ptoducers, appear to use the red/green
for the 34's and the red yellow for both
the 34's & 36's 
thanks
mel perry


Dave Parker
 

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 11:41 AM, David Soderblom wrote:
I note with interest the three factories in northern California, Salinas, ~Oakland, and Tracy/Los Banos.  Yet Calif. is not a producer of the materials (take a look at all those cukes from Michigan!), implying a lot of shipment of the materials from elsewhere.  Yet I don’t recall ever seeing a Heinz car in a Calif. photo, let alone many.
I think you have to consider the breadth of the Heinz product line beyond cucumber pickles.  Two of the CA facilities are discussed on p. 7 of the 1946 report.

Also, I'm not sure how true this was in 1946, but today CA is the leading US producer of just about any agricultural commodity that you can name (e.g., tomatoes, which make ketchup).
 
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


mel perry
 

hunt's had a huge cannery in hayward,
most of it long gone, except the portion
that belongs to costco's business center
mel perry

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020, 12:56 PM Dave Parker via groups.io <spottab=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 11:41 AM, David Soderblom wrote:
I note with interest the three factories in northern California, Salinas, ~Oakland, and Tracy/Los Banos.  Yet Calif. is not a producer of the materials (take a look at all those cukes from Michigan!), implying a lot of shipment of the materials from elsewhere.  Yet I don’t recall ever seeing a Heinz car in a Calif. photo, let alone many.
I think you have to consider the breadth of the Heinz product line beyond cucumber pickles.  Two of the CA facilities are discussed on p. 7 of the 1946 report.

Also, I'm not sure how true this was in 1946, but today CA is the leading US producer of just about any agricultural commodity that you can name (e.g., tomatoes, which make ketchup).
 
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Douglas Harding
 

David, Heinz was much more than pickles. They have a plant in Muscatine IA, here is a story from the local paper.

 

For many years, Iowa tomato growers had a buyer for their crop in Muscatine.

 

Kraft Heinz’s second production facility — and the company’s first outside Pittsburgh — was constructed in Muscatine in 1893. It originally processed sauerkraut, horseradish and pickles.

 

The plant added ketchup and other tomato products in 1898. Muscatine was then in the heart of a tomato-growing region that included western Illinois. For many decades, the plant was taking in tons of tomatoes during the months of August and September and turning out millions of bottles of ketchup.

 

That changed in 1991 when Kraft Heinz switched to using tomato paste for production of ketchup and other tomato products, according to Michael Mullen, senior vice president of corporate and government affairs at Kraft Heinz.

 

Mullen said the Muscatine plant remains a strategic facility, producing ketchup, mustard, barbecue sauces, honey, hot sauce, cocktail sauce and sweet-and-sour sauces.

 

It is quite likely those California plants were processing California tomatoes. Or turning cabbage into sauerkraut. Or any of the other Heinz products. As to “Heinz” cars. Attached is a photo I took of the Muscatine plant loading tracks 8 years ago. Don’t see a single car labeled Heinz. All are large extreme height boxcars. Period photos show standard wood sheathed boxcars at the loading platforms, attached is a photo from 1914.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Soderblom
Sent: Thursday, July 16, 2020 1:42 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Heinz plant locations

 

I note with interest the three factories in northern California, Salinas, ~Oakland, and Tracy/Los Banos.  Yet Calif. is not a producer of the materials (take a look at all those cukes from Michigan!), implying a lot of shipment of the materials from elsewhere.  Yet I don’t recall ever seeing a Heinz car in a Calif. photo, let alone many.

David Soderblom

Baltimore MD USA

 

 

 

 

 


Dave Parker
 

And, as for seeing Heinz cars:

In 1926, the fleet was 115 cars, 41 of them reefers

By 1935, the reefers were gone and there were 35 pickle tank cars and 10 vinegar tank cars

Slightly different mix in 1945, but only 38 cars total (and no reefers).

I'm tempted to say that the probability of seeing an HJHX car at any particular location was pretty darn low.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Matthew Hurst
 

Heinz has a plant in Winchester, VA served by the Baltimore and Ohio. Vinegar and pickle cars were seen in town. 

Also National Fruit, served by the Pennsylvania Railroad, has a small collection of vinegar cars and would traverse the PRR. 

Matthew Hurst
PRRT&HS #6799
PRRT&HS modeling committee 


On Jul 16, 2020, at 4:05 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:


hunt's had a huge cannery in hayward,
most of it long gone, except the portion
that belongs to costco's business center
mel perry

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020, 12:56 PM Dave Parker via groups.io <spottab=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 11:41 AM, David Soderblom wrote:
I note with interest the three factories in northern California, Salinas, ~Oakland, and Tracy/Los Banos.  Yet Calif. is not a producer of the materials (take a look at all those cukes from Michigan!), implying a lot of shipment of the materials from elsewhere.  Yet I don’t recall ever seeing a Heinz car in a Calif. photo, let alone many.
I think you have to consider the breadth of the Heinz product line beyond cucumber pickles.  Two of the CA facilities are discussed on p. 7 of the 1946 report.

Also, I'm not sure how true this was in 1946, but today CA is the leading US producer of just about any agricultural commodity that you can name (e.g., tomatoes, which make ketchup).
 
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


David Soderblom
 

About Heinz in California:  I pointed out cukes and Michigan just because it was so notable on the map.  Equally notable is the lack of receiving stations of any kind in the Bay Area and region.  Heinz called out all those receiving stations in the east, so their dearth in the west is meaningful, and it doesn’t matter what product of theirs you’re talking about.  Why the disparity?



David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA







Craig Wilson
 

Heinz (now Heinz North America) still has a facility located along W. 16th Street in Holland Michigan.  See the attached Google Earth image.  There are still large vinegar vats that are visible in the upper left in the image (sitting in line next to them while waiting to load there can be no doubt what they are).  No rails into the plant any more but the roadbed (Pere Marquette/C&O) can be seen curving in from the northeast in the upper right corner of the image.

Last time I was there the plant was shipping out small condiment ("relish") packets in semi-trucks and marine containers - which traveled by RAIL from Chicago.  Everyone I dealt with there seemed to have an unpleasant attitude - which might be a consequence of having to work every day in a place with a strong odor of vinegar!

Craig Wilson





akerboomk
 

RE: Receiving stations in bay area

 

Could another company have acted as a distributor in California?


--
Ken Akerboom


Dave Parker
 

Re:  Absence of receiving stations in CA

We can only speculate, but the factory in Tracy was completed in 1946, and accounted for 15% of Heinz's US production (see p. 7).  Tracy is in the (northern) heart of the San Joaquin Valley, one of  the proverbial "breadbaskets of the world", and the one with most crop diversity.  Even by 1940,  much of the SJV's road network was paved, including all of Highway 99 which connected Bakersfield and Sacramento.

My guess would be that the combination of a modern plant that did not specialize in cucumber products, and a more modern infrastructure, obviated the need for receiving stations.  Much of what was processed at Tracy could have come from fields within a 50 or 100 mile radius.

Much of the cucumber infrastructure in MI also appears in the 1910 map, suggesting a lot of legacy facilities, although there seems to have been some consolidation of factories.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Eric Hansmann
 

There are a couple sets of vats in that image. There are a host of slightly smaller vats on the right side of the plant. I also see two spurs to the facility. These other vats sit between the two spurs.

 

There seem to be freight cars sitting on the lower spur to the right near a parking lot.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Craig Wilson
Sent: Friday, July 17, 2020 10:35 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Heinz plant locations

 

Heinz (now Heinz North America) still has a facility located along W. 16th Street in Holland Michigan.  See the attached Google Earth image.  There are still large vinegar vats that are visible in the upper left in the image (sitting in line next to them while waiting to load there can be no doubt what they are).  No rails into the plant any more but the roadbed (Pere Marquette/C&O) can be seen curving in from the northeast in the upper right corner of the image.

 

Last time I was there the plant was shipping out small condiment ("relish") packets in semi-trucks and marine containers - which traveled by RAIL from Chicago.  Everyone I dealt with there seemed to have an unpleasant attitude - which might be a consequence of having to work every day in a place with a strong odor of vinegar!

 

Craig Wilson

 

 

 

 


Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 12:51 PM, Eric Hansmann wrote:
There seem to be freight cars sitting on the lower spur to the right near a parking lot.
I discovered that plant two years ago when I spent a week in Holland, MI with the grand kids, and the track was still in at that time, and looked active. That line runs between the street and a big public park, so I would assume the track will disappear quickly if it's abandoned.

Interesting detail of the plant, at the main gate on 16th street, is a wooden vat turned on it's side to make a shelter for the turnstiles the employees walk through to enter the plant.

Dennis Storzek


Douglas Harding
 

The link given is for the Kohr’s meat packing plant in Davenport. I believe taken while the building was being expanded. This plant later became Oscar Meyer.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2020 10:40 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Heinz plant locations

 

Photo: Heinz Plant, Muscatine, Iowa

An undated photo from the Musser Public Library:

http://www.umvphotoarchive.org/digital/collection/scdpl/id/583/rec/291

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

A couple of indistinct fright cars in this photo.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA