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how do you paint trucks of early freight cars?

Ray Hutchison
 

We know that different roads painted the car trucks in different ways, but I am wondering how we know what those colors are / should be?  In some instances the information is pretty stable (Great Northern had trucks painted same color as the cars) and in some instances you can tell from photographs (the Fowler Son & Co. reefer below was part of discussion a couple of weeks ago, the wheels were painted same color as the body).  Is there any listing of this information that I could be looking at?  I am specifically looking for information about trucks for the 36' Yakima Valley Apple truss rod reefers, which were part of the Northern Refrigerator Car Co.


Ken Adams
 

On a whim I just ordered the HO decals from K4 Decals for this car. It is a totally offline project from my 1950's Port Costa layout but one of those I just could not refuse.
There is a picture on the
 https://sandcrr.blogspot.com/2020/05/some-progress-made-but-not-too-much.html?m=0 
blog of a completed model using an old MDC 36 foot reefer kit. 

Looks like I will have to use eBay to find a Roundhouse 36 foot reefer kit as Accurail appears to make only 36 foot box cars.  Other suggestions welcome, maybe a resin kit. I'm in no hurry on this one.
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek

Ken Adams
 

In response to the original message, I would assume black trucks as they are probably wrought iron.
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek

Charlie Vlk
 

 

As in later periods, one must not be misled by early “Builders Photos”….

They would often have detail work done that is not present in regular delivery cars….wheel tire faces painted, raised lettering picked out, striping and different colors on journals and truck frames, and body hardware.

In service photos likely will show much plainer paint with maybe different colors on trucks and some hardware vs. carbodies.   Very detailed instructions on what paint process is to be used where existed and some may have survived.   Simplification of painting was a topic of Burlington Route Master Mechanics meetings and survive in notes and follow-up resolution of the discussions…mostly locomotives and passenger cars as for the times of the notes I’ve seen (1890s) I imagine freight cars were not subject to getting less fancy paint jobs.

The Aurora (Illinois) shops were the location of the Testing Laboratories for the Burlington Route and one of the ongoing areas of inquiry was the study of paint application methods, materials and durability; both commercial and local solvents, varnishes, pigments, paints and other finish and base materials were analyzed.

Charlie Vlk

Bob Chaparro
 

The George Fowler Son reefer appears to have paper wheels. Yes?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Jun 22, 2020 at 10:35 AM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
The George Fowler Son reefer appears to have paper wheels. Yes?
I don't think so. While I see some strange stripes on the wheel plates, I think they are oil drips, one reason why nobody bothered to paint wheels fancy colors, at least not after the first time :-) Meanwhile, when enlarged the wheel plate seems to have a dished shape, and what appears to be foundry lettering cast in. Paper wheels had a flat steel plate to contain the paper filler, and a pattern of bolts to hold the front and back plates together; also bolts to attach to the tire. Got to be careful when trying to identify a paper wheel, however, as there were also flat plate wheels with cast iron fillers that looked almost the same.

Dennis Storzek